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SIGDOC reminiscences

SIGDOC reminiscences Commentary 31 SIGDOC Reminiscences Joe Rigo SIGDOC Founder Joe_Rigo@hotmail.com In the Beginning... In the mid 1970's, technical writers documented weapons of mass destruction for the military and its contractors. There were few computer-related jobs outside IBM and the other manufacturers. Corporate systems development managers did not know that people existed who were interested in such work. The shortage of technical people was so great that any writer who became familiar with the systems jargon was quickly pressured to work as a systems analyst. Not all that many people even knew the jargon. Computers were still new and scary to most writer types. The Society for Technical Communication was around, but it was focused almost completely on that military hardware. If there were any other organizations, I couldn't find them. I was a newly independent writer in New York City, recently out of IBM and Bankers Trust Company. As far as I could tell, there was only one other person in town doing this kind of work, and our paths never crossed. It was a mighty lonely world. A request in ACM Communications in September 1974 for people interested in forming a special interest committee on system documentation brought http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Journal of Computer Documentation (JCD) Association for Computing Machinery

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1527-6805
DOI
10.1145/504776.504778
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Commentary 31 SIGDOC Reminiscences Joe Rigo SIGDOC Founder Joe_Rigo@hotmail.com In the Beginning... In the mid 1970's, technical writers documented weapons of mass destruction for the military and its contractors. There were few computer-related jobs outside IBM and the other manufacturers. Corporate systems development managers did not know that people existed who were interested in such work. The shortage of technical people was so great that any writer who became familiar with the systems jargon was quickly pressured to work as a systems analyst. Not all that many people even knew the jargon. Computers were still new and scary to most writer types. The Society for Technical Communication was around, but it was focused almost completely on that military hardware. If there were any other organizations, I couldn't find them. I was a newly independent writer in New York City, recently out of IBM and Bankers Trust Company. As far as I could tell, there was only one other person in town doing this kind of work, and our paths never crossed. It was a mighty lonely world. A request in ACM Communications in September 1974 for people interested in forming a special interest committee on system documentation brought

Journal

ACM Journal of Computer Documentation (JCD)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: May 1, 2001

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