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Privacy policies as decision-making tools: an evaluation of online privacy notices

Privacy policies as decision-making tools: an evaluation of online privacy notices CHI 2004 «×€ ¬ Paper 24-29 April «×€ ¬ Vienna, Austria Privacy Policies as Decision-Making Tools: An Evaluation of Online Privacy Notices Carlos Jensen, Colin Potts GVU Center, College of Computing The Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332, USA {carlosj, potts} @cc.gatech.edu +1-404-894-5551 ABSTRACT Studies have repeatedly shown that users are increasingly concerned about their privacy when they go online. In response to both public interest and regulatory pressures, privacy policies have become almost ubiquitous. An estimated 77% of websites now post a privacy policy. These policies differ greatly from site to site, and often address issues that are different from those that users care about. They are in most cases the users ™ only source of information. This paper evaluates the usability of online privacy policies, as well as the practice of posting them. We analyze 64 current privacy policies, their accessibility, writing, content and evolution over time. We examine how well these policies meet user needs and how they can be improved. We determine that significant changes need to be made to current practice to meet regulatory and usability requirements. Author Keywords their online privacy [9]. In a separate study, 69% said that they were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Privacy policies as decision-making tools: an evaluation of online privacy notices

Association for Computing Machinery — Apr 25, 2004

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References (22)

Datasource
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by ACM Inc.
ISBN
1-58113-702-8
doi
10.1145/985692.985752
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHI 2004 «×€ ¬ Paper 24-29 April «×€ ¬ Vienna, Austria Privacy Policies as Decision-Making Tools: An Evaluation of Online Privacy Notices Carlos Jensen, Colin Potts GVU Center, College of Computing The Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30332, USA {carlosj, potts} @cc.gatech.edu +1-404-894-5551 ABSTRACT Studies have repeatedly shown that users are increasingly concerned about their privacy when they go online. In response to both public interest and regulatory pressures, privacy policies have become almost ubiquitous. An estimated 77% of websites now post a privacy policy. These policies differ greatly from site to site, and often address issues that are different from those that users care about. They are in most cases the users ™ only source of information. This paper evaluates the usability of online privacy policies, as well as the practice of posting them. We analyze 64 current privacy policies, their accessibility, writing, content and evolution over time. We examine how well these policies meet user needs and how they can be improved. We determine that significant changes need to be made to current practice to meet regulatory and usability requirements. Author Keywords their online privacy [9]. In a separate study, 69% said that they were

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