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Physical database design for relational databases

Physical database design for relational databases This paper describes the concepts used in the implementation of DBDSGN, an experimental physical design tool for relational databases developed at the IBM San Jose Research Laboratory. Given a workload for System R (consisting of a set of SQL statements and their execution frequencies), DBDSGN suggests physical configurations for efficient performance. Each configuration consists of a set of indices and an ordering for each table. Workload statements are evaluated only for atomic configurations of indices, which have only one index per table. Costs for any configuration can be obtained from those of the atomic configurations. DBDSGN uses information supplied by the System R optimizer both to determine which columns might be worth indexing and to obtain estimates of the cost of executing statements in different configurations. The tool finds efficient solutions to the index-selection problem; if we assume the cost estimates supplied by the optimizer are the actual execution costs, it finds the optimal solution. Optionally, heuristics can be used to reduce execution time. The approach taken by DBDSGN in solving the index-selection problem for multiple-table statements significantly reduces the complexity of the problem. DBDSGN's principles were used in the Relational Design Tool (RDT), an IBM product based on DBDSGN, which performs design for SQL/DS, a relational system based on System R. System R actually uses DBDSGN's suggested solutions as the tool expects because cost estimates and other necessary information can be obtained from System R using a new SQL statement, the EXPLAIN statement. This illustrates how a system can export a model of its internal assumptions and behavior so that other systems (such as tools) can share this model. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Transactions on Database Systems (TODS) Association for Computing Machinery

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