Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

New Technology and the Post-human Self: Rethinking Appropriation and Resistance

New Technology and the Post-human Self: Rethinking Appropriation and Resistance New Technology and the Post-human Self: Rethinking Appropriation and Resistance Neil Ramiller Reed College Abstract In keeping with the current appreciation for the sociomateriality of technology-enabled practice, we are now advised to de-center human beings and to situate them as but one component among many in complex networks of heterogeneous actors. More radical still, we are counseled to question the very premise of distinctive subjects and objects. Human actors and technological artifacts are increasingly seen to have no independent status of their own, but to emerge in a mutually constitutive way from the unfolding of ordinary practices. This essay explores the implications of this line of thinking for people's practical encounters with new information technologies. We begin by considering how the individual's engagement with spaces, materials, and technologies builds upon a fundamental embodiment of mind and then extends outward in a way that makes flexible and expansive the effective boundaries of the self. On the other hand, we observe that the kind of fusion this implies is not ontologically given, but emerges through the active and disciplined engagement of the human practitioner. Acknowledging that the materiality of the post-human self is, in fact, a human accomplishment can yield http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM SIGMIS Database: the DATABASE for Advances in Information Systems Association for Computing Machinery

New Technology and the Post-human Self: Rethinking Appropriation and Resistance

Loading next page...
 
/lp/association-for-computing-machinery/new-technology-and-the-post-human-self-rethinking-appropriation-and-YAze8NnV20
Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
0095-0033
DOI
10.1145/3025099.3025102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

New Technology and the Post-human Self: Rethinking Appropriation and Resistance Neil Ramiller Reed College Abstract In keeping with the current appreciation for the sociomateriality of technology-enabled practice, we are now advised to de-center human beings and to situate them as but one component among many in complex networks of heterogeneous actors. More radical still, we are counseled to question the very premise of distinctive subjects and objects. Human actors and technological artifacts are increasingly seen to have no independent status of their own, but to emerge in a mutually constitutive way from the unfolding of ordinary practices. This essay explores the implications of this line of thinking for people's practical encounters with new information technologies. We begin by considering how the individual's engagement with spaces, materials, and technologies builds upon a fundamental embodiment of mind and then extends outward in a way that makes flexible and expansive the effective boundaries of the self. On the other hand, we observe that the kind of fusion this implies is not ontologically given, but emerges through the active and disciplined engagement of the human practitioner. Acknowledging that the materiality of the post-human self is, in fact, a human accomplishment can yield

Journal

ACM SIGMIS Database: the DATABASE for Advances in Information SystemsAssociation for Computing Machinery

Published: Dec 13, 2016

There are no references for this article.