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Network intrusion detection through Adaptive Sub-Eigenspace Modeling in multiagent systems

Network intrusion detection through Adaptive Sub-Eigenspace Modeling in multiagent systems Recently, network security has become an extremely vital issue that beckons the development of accurate and efficient solutions capable of effectively defending our network systems and the valuable information journeying through them. In this article, a distributed multiagent intrusion detection system (IDS) architecture is proposed, which attempts to provide an accurate and lightweight solution to network intrusion detection by tackling issues associated with the design of a distributed multiagent system, such as poor system scalability and the requirements of excessive processing power and memory storage. The proposed IDS architecture consists of (i) the Host layer with lightweight host agents that perform anomaly detection in network connections to their respective hosts, and (ii) the Classification layer whose main functions are to perform misuse detection for the host agents, detect distributed attacks, and disseminate network security status information to the whole network. The intrusion detection task is achieved through the employment of the lightweight Adaptive Sub-Eigenspace Modeling (ASEM)-based anomaly and misuse detection schemes. Promising experimental results indicate that ASEM-based schemes outperform the KNN and LOF algorithms, with high detection rates and low false alarm rates in the anomaly detection task, and outperform several well-known supervised classification methods such as C4.5 Decision Tree, SVM, NN, KNN, Logistic, and Decision Table (DT) in the misuse detection task. To assess the performance in a real-world scenario, the Relative Assumption Model, feature extraction techniques, and common network attack generation tools are employed to generate normal and anomalous traffic in a private LAN testbed. Furthermore, the scalability performance of the proposed IDS architecture is investigated through the simulation of the proposed agent communication scheme, and satisfactory linear relationships for both degradation of system response time and agent communication generated network traffic overhead are achieved. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems (TAAS) Association for Computing Machinery

Network intrusion detection through Adaptive Sub-Eigenspace Modeling in multiagent systems

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1556-4665
DOI
10.1145/1278460.1278463
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recently, network security has become an extremely vital issue that beckons the development of accurate and efficient solutions capable of effectively defending our network systems and the valuable information journeying through them. In this article, a distributed multiagent intrusion detection system (IDS) architecture is proposed, which attempts to provide an accurate and lightweight solution to network intrusion detection by tackling issues associated with the design of a distributed multiagent system, such as poor system scalability and the requirements of excessive processing power and memory storage. The proposed IDS architecture consists of (i) the Host layer with lightweight host agents that perform anomaly detection in network connections to their respective hosts, and (ii) the Classification layer whose main functions are to perform misuse detection for the host agents, detect distributed attacks, and disseminate network security status information to the whole network. The intrusion detection task is achieved through the employment of the lightweight Adaptive Sub-Eigenspace Modeling (ASEM)-based anomaly and misuse detection schemes. Promising experimental results indicate that ASEM-based schemes outperform the KNN and LOF algorithms, with high detection rates and low false alarm rates in the anomaly detection task, and outperform several well-known supervised classification methods such as C4.5 Decision Tree, SVM, NN, KNN, Logistic, and Decision Table (DT) in the misuse detection task. To assess the performance in a real-world scenario, the Relative Assumption Model, feature extraction techniques, and common network attack generation tools are employed to generate normal and anomalous traffic in a private LAN testbed. Furthermore, the scalability performance of the proposed IDS architecture is investigated through the simulation of the proposed agent communication scheme, and satisfactory linear relationships for both degradation of system response time and agent communication generated network traffic overhead are achieved.

Journal

ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems (TAAS)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: Sep 1, 2007

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