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Klare's “useful information” is useful for Web designers

Klare's “useful information” is useful for Web designers Commentary 141 Most readability principles apply to Web-site design Klare ™s œUseful Information  is Useful for Web Designers Kristin Zibell Virchow, Krause, and Company LLP 4600 American Parkway P.O. Box 7398 Madison, WI 53707-7398 kzibell@virchowkrause.com Abstract In many ways the writing principles that Klare recommended 37 years ago to promote high readability scores still apply to web-site design. Behind the pursuit of readability lies audience analysis, a concern with the intellectual level, previous experience, motivation, and reading goals of one ™s intended audience. Suitably adjusted to take account of online interactivity, those same concerns should guide design work on web structure and interfaces today. I.7.5 Document analysis ”human factors Keywords: web architecture, audience analysis, user goals Introduction readable information: ¢ Readability for the reader, ¢ The writer ™s purpose. Thirty-seven years and an entire communication medium later, these principles hold true for designing useful information on the World Wide Web. This article examines Klare ™s principles from the perspective of a web designer. First, I discuss Klare ™s definition of readability and how it applies to designing information for the web. Then I discuss Klare ™s two principles, readability for the reader and the writer ™s purpose, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Journal of Computer Documentation (JCD) Association for Computing Machinery

Klare's “useful information” is useful for Web designers

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1527-6805
DOI
10.1145/344599.344641
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Commentary 141 Most readability principles apply to Web-site design Klare ™s œUseful Information  is Useful for Web Designers Kristin Zibell Virchow, Krause, and Company LLP 4600 American Parkway P.O. Box 7398 Madison, WI 53707-7398 kzibell@virchowkrause.com Abstract In many ways the writing principles that Klare recommended 37 years ago to promote high readability scores still apply to web-site design. Behind the pursuit of readability lies audience analysis, a concern with the intellectual level, previous experience, motivation, and reading goals of one ™s intended audience. Suitably adjusted to take account of online interactivity, those same concerns should guide design work on web structure and interfaces today. I.7.5 Document analysis ”human factors Keywords: web architecture, audience analysis, user goals Introduction readable information: ¢ Readability for the reader, ¢ The writer ™s purpose. Thirty-seven years and an entire communication medium later, these principles hold true for designing useful information on the World Wide Web. This article examines Klare ™s principles from the perspective of a web designer. First, I discuss Klare ™s definition of readability and how it applies to designing information for the web. Then I discuss Klare ™s two principles, readability for the reader and the writer ™s purpose,

Journal

ACM Journal of Computer Documentation (JCD)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: Aug 1, 2000

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