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Introduction to this classic reprint and commentaries

Introduction to this classic reprint and commentaries Reprint 105 Introduction to This Classic Reprint and Commentaries Bob Waite Dept 52X, Bldg. 004-2 IBM Corporation Rochester, MN 55901 rwaite@us.ibm.com I n his introduction to The Measurement of Readability, George R. Klare describes the book as œprimarily a review of research literature in the field of readability, together with an analysis of trends and conclusions that can be drawn from the existing data  (Klare, 1963, p. 1). In other words, rather than present just the author ™s position on readability, it summarizes the larger state of contemporary research, especially as it relates to readability formulas. Although Klare cautions, œPrimarily, a formula is a means of rating a piece of writing after it has been written  (p. 18), he also says, œIn this book, ˜readability formula ™ refers to a method of measurement intended as a predictive device that will provide quantitative, objective estimates of the style difficulty of writing  (p.3; italics Klare ™s). Chapter one of Klare ™s book begins with a goal statement: the importance of readable writing for the reader ™s sake. Then it reviews five principles of writing readably, discusses how to use a readability formula, and explains how to choose http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Journal of Computer Documentation (JCD) Association for Computing Machinery

Introduction to this classic reprint and commentaries

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1527-6805
DOI
10.1145/344599.344626
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reprint 105 Introduction to This Classic Reprint and Commentaries Bob Waite Dept 52X, Bldg. 004-2 IBM Corporation Rochester, MN 55901 rwaite@us.ibm.com I n his introduction to The Measurement of Readability, George R. Klare describes the book as œprimarily a review of research literature in the field of readability, together with an analysis of trends and conclusions that can be drawn from the existing data  (Klare, 1963, p. 1). In other words, rather than present just the author ™s position on readability, it summarizes the larger state of contemporary research, especially as it relates to readability formulas. Although Klare cautions, œPrimarily, a formula is a means of rating a piece of writing after it has been written  (p. 18), he also says, œIn this book, ˜readability formula ™ refers to a method of measurement intended as a predictive device that will provide quantitative, objective estimates of the style difficulty of writing  (p.3; italics Klare ™s). Chapter one of Klare ™s book begins with a goal statement: the importance of readable writing for the reader ™s sake. Then it reviews five principles of writing readably, discusses how to use a readability formula, and explains how to choose

Journal

ACM Journal of Computer Documentation (JCD)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: Aug 1, 2000

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