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Introduction

Introduction Introduction 64 Introduction Bob Waite Dept.52X, Bldg. 004-2 IBM Corporation Rochester, MN 55901 rwaite@us.ibm.com Twenty years ago, IBM provided many opportunities for its information developers across the country and around the world to get together to share experiences. IBM's internal education program rivaled many universities, and all information developers were required to take a minimum of 40 hours of classes each year. If a class happened to be offered in Boca Raton, Austin, Poughkeepsie, or Toronto, getting authorization to travel there was seldom a problem. In addition to the numerous classes that one could take or teach, Technical Interchange Groups (TIGs) and Interdivisional Technical Liaisons (ITLs) offered additional opportunities for site representatives to meet two or three times each year. The atmosphere was open and relaxed because IBM was successful and had little competition. This comfortable, self-assured, can-do environment was the world into which a small (53 pages) book entitled Producing Quality Technical Information (PQTI) first appeared (IBM 1983). The book was written by information developers at IBM's Santa Teresa Laboratory (since renamed Silicon Valley Laboratory) in San Jose, California. Santa Teresa was one of IBM's smaller, newer sites. Its primary mission was software development for database products http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ACM Journal of Computer Documentation (JCD) Association for Computing Machinery

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1527-6805
DOI
10.1145/604228.604230
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction 64 Introduction Bob Waite Dept.52X, Bldg. 004-2 IBM Corporation Rochester, MN 55901 rwaite@us.ibm.com Twenty years ago, IBM provided many opportunities for its information developers across the country and around the world to get together to share experiences. IBM's internal education program rivaled many universities, and all information developers were required to take a minimum of 40 hours of classes each year. If a class happened to be offered in Boca Raton, Austin, Poughkeepsie, or Toronto, getting authorization to travel there was seldom a problem. In addition to the numerous classes that one could take or teach, Technical Interchange Groups (TIGs) and Interdivisional Technical Liaisons (ITLs) offered additional opportunities for site representatives to meet two or three times each year. The atmosphere was open and relaxed because IBM was successful and had little competition. This comfortable, self-assured, can-do environment was the world into which a small (53 pages) book entitled Producing Quality Technical Information (PQTI) first appeared (IBM 1983). The book was written by information developers at IBM's Santa Teresa Laboratory (since renamed Silicon Valley Laboratory) in San Jose, California. Santa Teresa was one of IBM's smaller, newer sites. Its primary mission was software development for database products

Journal

ACM Journal of Computer Documentation (JCD)Association for Computing Machinery

Published: Aug 1, 2002

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