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Information systems and organizational change

Information systems and organizational change (2) What are the main organizational constraints on change? (3) What are the mechanisms for effecting change? Social Impacts of Computing R. Kling Editor Effective implementation relies on incremental change, small-scale projects, and face-to-face facilitation. (Ginzberg [22], Vertinsky et al. [71], Keen and Scott Morton [36]) A strategy for long-term change and largescale innovation requires a broader strategy; the conceptual and empirical work on implementation, both within MIS and OR/MS and in political science, provides few guidelines and some very pessimistic conclusions. The main argument of this paper is that information systems development is an intensely political as well as technical process and that organizational mechanisms are needed that provide MIS managers with authority and resources for negotiation. The traditional view of MIS as a staff function ignores the pluralism of organizational decision making and the link between information and power. Information systems increasingly alter relationships, patterns of communication and perceived influence, authority, and control. A strategy for implementation must therefore recognize and deal with the politics of data and the likelihood, even legitimacy, of counterirnplementation. Information Systems and Organizational Change P e t e r G. W . K e e n Sloan School of Management, MIT http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Communications of the ACM Association for Computing Machinery

Information systems and organizational change

Communications of the ACM , Volume 24 (1) – Jan 1, 1981

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 1981 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
0001-0782
DOI
10.1145/358527.358543
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

(2) What are the main organizational constraints on change? (3) What are the mechanisms for effecting change? Social Impacts of Computing R. Kling Editor Effective implementation relies on incremental change, small-scale projects, and face-to-face facilitation. (Ginzberg [22], Vertinsky et al. [71], Keen and Scott Morton [36]) A strategy for long-term change and largescale innovation requires a broader strategy; the conceptual and empirical work on implementation, both within MIS and OR/MS and in political science, provides few guidelines and some very pessimistic conclusions. The main argument of this paper is that information systems development is an intensely political as well as technical process and that organizational mechanisms are needed that provide MIS managers with authority and resources for negotiation. The traditional view of MIS as a staff function ignores the pluralism of organizational decision making and the link between information and power. Information systems increasingly alter relationships, patterns of communication and perceived influence, authority, and control. A strategy for implementation must therefore recognize and deal with the politics of data and the likelihood, even legitimacy, of counterirnplementation. Information Systems and Organizational Change P e t e r G. W . K e e n Sloan School of Management, MIT

Journal

Communications of the ACMAssociation for Computing Machinery

Published: Jan 1, 1981

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