Getting to green: understanding resource consumption in the home

Getting to green: understanding resource consumption in the home Getting to Green: Understanding Resource Consumption in the Home Marshini Chetty, David Tran and Rebecca E. Grinter* GVU Center and School of Interactive Computing Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA, USA {marshini, beki*}@cc.gatech.edu, David.Tran@gtri.gatech.edu ABSTRACT Rising global energy demands, increasing costs and limited natural resources mean that householders are more conscious about managing their domestic resource consumption. Yet, the question of what tools Ubicomp researchers can create for residential resource management remains open. To begin to address this omission, we present a qualitative study of 15 households and their current management practices around the water, electricity and natural gas systems in the home. We find that in-themoment resource consumption is mostly invisible to householders and that they desire more real-time information to help them save money, keep their homes comfortable and be environmentally friendly. Designing for domestic sustainability therefore turns on improving the visibility of resource production and consumption costs as well as supporting both individuals and collectives in behavior change. Domestic sustainability also highlights the caveat of potentially creating a green divide by making resource management available only to those who can afford the technologies to support being green. Finally, we suggest that the Ubicomp community can http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

Getting to green: understanding resource consumption in the home

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Datasource
acm
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by ACM Inc.
ISBN
978-1-60558-136-1
D.O.I.
10.1145/1409635.1409668
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Getting to Green: Understanding Resource Consumption in the Home Marshini Chetty, David Tran and Rebecca E. Grinter* GVU Center and School of Interactive Computing Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA, USA {marshini, beki*}@cc.gatech.edu, David.Tran@gtri.gatech.edu ABSTRACT Rising global energy demands, increasing costs and limited natural resources mean that householders are more conscious about managing their domestic resource consumption. Yet, the question of what tools Ubicomp researchers can create for residential resource management remains open. To begin to address this omission, we present a qualitative study of 15 households and their current management practices around the water, electricity and natural gas systems in the home. We find that in-themoment resource consumption is mostly invisible to householders and that they desire more real-time information to help them save money, keep their homes comfortable and be environmentally friendly. Designing for domestic sustainability therefore turns on improving the visibility of resource production and consumption costs as well as supporting both individuals and collectives in behavior change. Domestic sustainability also highlights the caveat of potentially creating a green divide by making resource management available only to those who can afford the technologies to support being green. Finally, we suggest that the Ubicomp community can

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