A cry for more tech at CHI!

A cry for more tech at CHI! BLoGPoST KriSTina h K Swedish Institute of computer Science | kia@sics.se Kristina H k is the technical program chair for CHI 2012. A Cry for More Tech at CHI! This is a rant. And a plea. And an ad. With this rant, plea, and ad, I hope to attract more attention to the video and interactivity submissions at CHI 2012. But that is just a means to an end. The result I hope for is to make our field influential in shaping a whole new wave of interactions through technologies, the likes of which we have never seen before. One day in my lab, my colleagues told me to touch an actuator they wanted to use. As my finger met the surface, it suddenly became extremely cold, and I pulled back in surprise. It was almost painful ”and very unexpected. How could this very small surface grow so cold, so fast? My research team smiled at me, recognizing my reaction from their own experiences experimenting with the Peltier element. Apparently, a small current led through the material will make one side cold and the other side hot. When the current is applied in the opposite direction, the cool http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png interactions Association for Computing Machinery

A cry for more tech at CHI!

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Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
1072-5520
D.O.I.
10.1145/2090150.2090154
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BLoGPoST KriSTina h K Swedish Institute of computer Science | kia@sics.se Kristina H k is the technical program chair for CHI 2012. A Cry for More Tech at CHI! This is a rant. And a plea. And an ad. With this rant, plea, and ad, I hope to attract more attention to the video and interactivity submissions at CHI 2012. But that is just a means to an end. The result I hope for is to make our field influential in shaping a whole new wave of interactions through technologies, the likes of which we have never seen before. One day in my lab, my colleagues told me to touch an actuator they wanted to use. As my finger met the surface, it suddenly became extremely cold, and I pulled back in surprise. It was almost painful ”and very unexpected. How could this very small surface grow so cold, so fast? My research team smiled at me, recognizing my reaction from their own experiences experimenting with the Peltier element. Apparently, a small current led through the material will make one side cold and the other side hot. When the current is applied in the opposite direction, the cool

Journal

interactionsAssociation for Computing Machinery

Published: Mar 1, 2012

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