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Two successive partial mini-filament confined ejections

Two successive partial mini-filament confined ejections Active region (AR) NOAA 11476 produced a series of con ned plasma ejec- tions, mostly accompanied by ares of X-ray class M, from 08 to 10 May 2012. The structure and evolution of the con ned ejections resemble that of EUV surges; however, their origin is associated to the destabilization and eruption of a mini- lament, which lay along the photospheric inversion line (PIL) of a large rotating bipole. Our analysis indicate that the bipole rota- tion and ux cancellation along the PIL have a main role in destabilizing the structure and triggering the ejections. The observed bipole emerged within the main following AR polarity. Previous studies have analyzed and dis- cussed in detail two events of this series in which the mini- lament erupted as a whole, one at 12:23 UT on 09 May and the other at 04:18 UT on 10 May. In this article we present the observations of the con ned eruption and M4.1 are on 09 May 2012 at 21:01 UT (SOL2012-05-09T21:01:00) and the previous activity in which the mini- lament was involved. For the analysis we use data in multiple wavelengths (UV, EUV, X-rays, and magnetograms) from space instruments. In this particular case, the mini- lament is seen to erupt in two di erent sections. The northern section erupted accompanied by a C1.6 are and the southern section did it in association with the M4.1 Corresponding author Email address: lopezf@iafe.uba.ar (M. L opez Fuentes) Fellow of CONICET, Argentina Member of the Carrera del Investigador Cient  co, CONICET, Argentina Preprint submitted to Advances in Space Research November 5, 2019 arXiv:1911.00901v1 [astro-ph.SR] 3 Nov 2019 are. The global structure and direction of both con ned ejections and the location of a far are kernel, to where the plasma is seen to ow, suggest that both ejections and ares follow a similar underlying mechanism. Keywords: Solar Physics, Solar activity, Solar ares, Solar ultraviolet emission, Solar X-ray and gamma-ray emission PACS: 96.60.-j, 96.60.Q-, 96.50.qe, 96.60.Tf, *96.60.tj, 96.60.Tf, *96.60.tk 1. Introduction Solar activity produces several kinds of ejecta from full- edge coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to surges, jets, and sprays. These ejections are character- ized by their evolution, observed size, geometry, associated energies, and masses involved, and sometimes are classi ed considering the instruments with which they have been observed (Webb and Howard, 2012; Raoua et al., 2016; Can eld et al., 1996; Schmieder et al., 1996). For instance, the classi - cation of phenomena like surges and sprays has its origin in H observations (see e.g. Foukal, 2004). The main di erence between them is that while ma- terial in surges falls back down through the same magnetic structure through which it was ejected, in sprays the ejected mass apparently reaches escape velocity continuously ascending away from its point of origin in the chromo- sphere or very low corona (see Webb and Jackson, 1981). Recent investigations have associated coronal jets to the eruption of so- called mini- laments, whose plasma provides most of the ejected material (Shen et al., 2012; Adams et al., 2014; Sterling et al., 2015, 2016; Panesar et al., 2016; Joshi et al., 2018; Yang and Zhang, 2018; Moore et al., 2018). Even in cases of lower resolution observations, mini- lament reformation and eruption has been postulated as the origin of a series of blow-out jets and re- lated events (Chandra et al., 2017). In all the previous works, the mechanism proposed for the destabilization of the mini- lament is the magnetic ux can- cellation along the polarity inversion line (PIL) above which the mini- lament lays. Given the appropriate magnetic con guration, two reconnection pro- cesses may occur: a rst, "inner", reconnection process in the magnetic eld below the mini- lament, usually associated to a are, and a second, "exter- nal" process produced by the ascent of the mini- lament, whose supporting magnetic eld lines reconnect with the ones of the overlying magnetic eld yielding the injection of material into open lines producing the jet (Sterling et al., 2016). 2 The role of mini- laments in the process just described led Wyper et al. (2017, 2018) to suggest that jets are produced by the same kind of mechanism, namely breakout reconnection, proposed to explain larger scale phenomena like CMEs (see e.g. Karpen et al., 2012). The numerical con guration in those simulations consists of a magnetic bipole emerging in a uniform unipolar magnetic ux area. This kind of con guration leads to the appearence of a coronal null-point above the bipole. Shearing motions imposed on the system provide free magnetic energy and produce a small ux rope that supports the mini- lament. The sheared magnetic structure expands and a reconnection process is triggered in the region around the coronal null point. As in the classical breakout model of CMEs, the reconnection removes part of the eld restraining the ux rope, so it is propeled to rapidly ascend. At the same time, reconnection below the twisted ux rope is stimulated, consistently with the phenomenology described in the previous paragraph. It has been observed in occasions that only part of the full structure of the lament is ejected (see e.g. Cheng et al., 2018, and references therein). In those cases, the lament splits in two or more segments, some of which erupt at di erent times or not at all (Zuccarello et al., 2009; Tripathi et al., 2006; Chandra et al., 2010). This behaviour has been identi ed also in the case of mini- lament eruptions associated to coronal jets (see e.g. Panesar et al., 2017). The ejections studied in this article occurred in a similar magnetic con g- uration to that proposed to explain coronal jets, i.e. the presence of bipolar structures in the middle of a more extended unipolar region, in this case, the extended following polarity of active region (AR) NOAA 11576. A large mag- netic bipole is observed to rotate along serveral tens of hours accompanied by a series of eruptions associated to ares. One of these, which occurred on 09 May 2012 at 12:23 UT, has been extensively analyzed by us in previous articles (L opez Fuentes et al., 2015; L opez Fuentes et al., 2018), and another, which occurred on 10 May 2012 04:18 UT, was studied by Yang and Zhang (2018). The main di erence between the events studied here and a regular jet is that the ejected material remained con ned within the closed magnetic structure of the AR instead of reaching open eld lines. After the eruption, the ejected material ascended along eld lines that connected the main po- larities of the AR, part of it reached the farther footpoints of the lines, and part of it fell back to the region where the ejection initiated. This observed evolution resembled that of H and EUV surges (see the aforementioned references). 3 The main EUV event analyzed here occurred in AR 11576 on 09 May 2012 and was associated to an M4.1 are with a peak in GOES soft X-ray light curve at  21:01 UT. A close inspection of high resolution observations pre- vious to the event, in the 304 A band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA: Lemen et al., 2012), onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), indicates the presence of a mini- lament whose following eruption, accompa- nied by reconnection with the overlaying eld, constitutes the main source of the ejected material. The extended analysis some tens of minutes before the main M4.1 event indicates that a previous smaller ejection ocurred 36 min before, involving the eruption of a di erent section of the same mini- lament. This previous event was associated to a less energetic C1.6 are with peak intensity at  20:25 UT. In Sections 2.2{2.4, we analyze the evolution of both con ned eruptions and accompanying ares in several wavelengths using data from the instru- ments described in Section 2.1. In Section 3 we compare these successive events with the one analyzed by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018) and interperet our observations in the frame of that study. In Section 4 we present our concluding remarks. 2. Observations and Characteristics of the Events 2.1. The Data Used To study the ares and con ned eruptions we use UV continuum and EUV data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA: Lemen et al., 2012), onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and EUV observations from the Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI: Howard et al., 2008), onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft B, soft X-ray data from the X-ray Telescope (XRT: Golub et al., 2007) onboard Hinode, and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI: Scherrer et al., 2012), onboard SDO. Figure 1 depicts the soft X-ray curve in the 1 { 8 A channel, where we have identi ed with arrows and labels both aring events, as well as the one that occurred at 12:23 UT (L opez Fuentes et al., 2018), and the one that occurred at 04:18 UT on May 10 (Yang and Zhang, 2018). SDO/AIA data are from the 1700 A channel (from now on AIA 1700, T  5000 K) and 304 A channel (AIA 304, T  510 K). Both events are observed in AIA 304, while only the are at 21:01 UT is observed in AIA 1700. We select subimages containing AR 11576 from full-disk data for 4 the temporal range covering the analyzed events. We coalign the subimages and construct movies that are associated to the gures of Section 2.3. All images are displayed in logarithmic intensity scales for better contrast. We complement the SDO/AIA EUV data with images of the events from the 195 A channel of the SECCHI instrument. We use this band because it has the highest temporal resolution (5 minutes) in SECCHI. On the day of our events, STEREO-B was at an Earth ecliptic (HEE) longitude of -118 away from Earth, from this location AR 11576 was seen in the solar limb. SDO/HMI data are line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms, which are selected from full-disk images to study the evolution of the AR magnetic eld (see Section 2.2). 2.2. Summary of the Photospheric Magnetic Field Evolution The magnetic evolution of AR 11476 from appearance, on the eastern solar limb, on 04 May 2012 until the end of 10 May has been discussed in detail by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018). We summarize here their main results. AR 11476 had a global bipolar structure; its preceding negative polarity was compact and was followed by a very dispersed following positive polarity (see Figure 2). By 7 May two bipoles, which we have labeled as B1 and B2 in Figure 2, were seen in the middle of the AR main positive polarity. The magnetogram in this gure corresponds to 20:00 UT, 25 min before the rst event analyzed here. In the panels of Figure 3 we show the bipole orientations at the times of particular events. Figure 3a corresponds roughly to the time of GOES soft X-ray peak of the M4.7 are on 9 May at 12:23 UT, Figure 3b to approximately the time of GOES peak of the M4.1 are analyzed in this article, Figure 3c depicts the bipole locations at approximately the time of an M5.7 are peak at 04:18 UT on 10 May, while the last panel shows the magnetic con guration of the AR much later, when both bipoles had long ago stopped rotating and the negative polarity of B1 had almost disappeared. Both ares studied here and their related con ned eruptions or surges, originated in the neighborhood of B1 and B2. The bipoles, B1 and B2 were seen rotating clockwise. B1 rotated by  180 from 8 May at 00:00 UT to 10 May at 22:00 UT, while B2 rotated by  100 from the same starting time until  10:00 UT on 10 May. The rotation of each bipole is characterized by the rotation of their tilt angle, which is deter- mined following the method developed by Poisson et al. (2015). We include a movie showing the bipole rotations (bipole-rotation.mov) as supplementary material. The bipole rotations imply the injection of magnetic helicity and Figure 1: GOES soft X-ray curve in the 1 { 8 A channel showing the two aring events after  20:20 UT on 9 May 2012. The arrows point to their peak times. Each arrow is accompanied by labels indicating the X-ray class and time of the ares. As a reference we identify the peak of the event at 12:23 UT that was studied by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018) and that of the event at 4:18 UT studied by Yang and Zhang (2018). The peak between the C1.6 and M4.1 ares, indicated with a red arrow, corresponds to a are associated to the neighboring jet that occurred next to AR 11576 to the east at 20:45 UT and that is mentioned in Section 2.3. 6 Figure 2: SDO/HMI magnetogram of AR 11576 on 9 May at 20:00 UT, previous to the rst event analyzed here. The eld of view of the image covers approximately 260 Mm by 220 Mm. The location of bipoles B1 and B2 are indicated surrounded by a black box and corresponding labels. The events studied here occurred at the location of these bipoles. 7 Figure 3: SDO/HMI close-up magnetogram views of the bipoles shown in Figure 2. The arrows in panel a point to the locations of the bipoles. Panels a { c correspond approxi- mately to the times of the M ares on 9 and 10 May, while panel d shows the AR when B1 had almost completely disappeared. Blue corresponds to negative magnetic eld and red to positive eld. The magnetic eld contours in pink correspond to 200 G. The axes are in arcsec. The black and white dots correspond to the location of the negative and positive magnetic barycenters of bipole B1, computed following the method described by Poisson et al. (2015). The evolution of the black segment joining the barycenters of B1 indicates the variation of the bipole tilt angle, de ned here in the usual way, accordingly to Joy's law, as the bipole inclination with respect to the solar equator. A movie show- ing this rotation along three days is appended to this article as supplementary material (bipole-rotation.mov). 8 Figure 4: Tilt angle rotation (black curve) and evolution of the magnetic ux of B1 (positive ux in red and negative in blue). Computations are done for values of the eld above (below) 500 G (-500 G). consequently the accumulation of free magnetic energy; this evolution might contribute to the destabilization and eruption of the mini- lament during all the observed ares as proposed by Wyper et al. (2017, 2018). Furthermore, as we measured the bipole rotations, we also computed their magnetic ux. We found that the uxes of B1 and B2 decreased steeply. In the case of B1 its ux mainly cancelled with the surrounding magnetic eld, while in the case of B2 it was probably mostly dispersed. As discussed in Section 1, magnetic ux cancellation has been observed associated with surges and jets. Figure 4 depicts the rotation of the tilt angle and the magnetic ux evolution of B1 from 8 May to 10 May. B1 is the largest and main bipole involved in the events studied in this article. 2.3. UV Continuum and EUV Evolution as Seen from Earth Figures 5 and 7 show AIA 304 images at the times of the rst partial mini- lament eruption and accompanying C1.6 are, and of the M4.1 are and second partial mini- lament eruption, respectively. An HMI magnetogram contour is overlaid on the images in Figure 5a and Figure 7a as a reference. 9 As discussed in Section 1, recent observations relate jets to the eruption of mini- laments, which are smaller versions of normal large-scale laments. In the events analyzed in this article we nd evidence of the partial eruption of a curved mini- lament that extends all along the PIL of B1. This mini- lament is observed to erupt and reform several times from 8 May to 10 May. We infer that the continuous rotation and ux cancellation of B1 along these days contribute to the mini- lament reformation and destabilization. We include as supplementary material a movie with high temporal resolution (5 images per minute) in AIA 304 showing both ares and mini- lament eruptions (aia304.mp4). In the movie a jet is also observed at the east of the AR (right at the left border of the images) occurring around 20:45 UT. This event is unrelated to those studied here as it occurred away from the bipole areas where the mini- lament eruptions and ares took place. A are associated to this jet is identi ed in Figure 1 with a red arrow (no label) between the C1.6 and M4.1 ares. Figure 5 illustrates the initiation and evolution of the rst event. High resolution imagers, like SDO/AIA, allow us to clearly observe a curved dark structure with one section oriented in the NE{SW direction (henceforth, the northern section) and another oriented in the NW-SE direction (henceforth, the southern section, see also Figure 6b). These two sections have been pointed with black arrows in Figure 5b. Figure 5c shows the appearance of two bright kernels (indicated with a white arrow) that we consider to be the footpoints of a short arcade formed as the mini- lament northern section erupts. At the same time, a dense plasma eruption is seen extending towards the W. Figure 5d shows the eruption at its maximum extension reaching a far kernel, indicated with a white arrow, that globally has the same shape as the far kernel observed during the earlier event at 12:23 UT. Another elongated brightening, pointed by a white arrow in Figure 5b and d, is also seen to the W on the main negative AR polarity. The location of the rst are kernels, as well as the place from where the mini- lament eruption initiates, indicates that only the northern section of the mini- lament erupts. In Figure 6 we show an enlargement of the image in Figure 5a and b. Figure 6a shows the magnetic map as a reference. In this panel we have numbered the main polarities involved in the events studied in this arti- cle. Figure 6b corresponds to the AIA 304 image where the shape of the mini- lament before both eruptions can be more clearly seen. For an eas- ier identi cation of the mini- lament portions we added an inset showing a further enlargement of the bipole area. The north and south portions for 10 the mini- lament are indicated both in Figure 6b and in the inset. Notice the presence of a circular-shape brightening, pointed by a white arrow in Figure 5b (also observable in Figure 6b), that surrounds all the negative and part of the postitive polarity of B1 and all of B2, as happened in the event at 12:23 UT. This circular brightening is present since around 08 May, which strongly suggests that energy release at a very low rate occurred accompa- nying the rotation of the bipoles plausibly because of their interaction with the overlaying magnetic eld. Figure 7 shows the evolution of the second surge and associated M4.1 are as observed in the AIA 304 band. As in Figure 5, in Figure 7a we include an SDO/HMI contour as a reference to easily identify the location of the main AR polarities and B1 and B2 bipoles. In Figure 7b we indicate with a black arrow the remaining southern portion of the mini- lament, which is seen prominently right before starting to rise. In Figure 7c, the mini- lament is observed already ascending and an incipient brightening is noticeable below it. In Figure 7d, all the area around B1 is seen bright as the peak intensity of the are happens. The mini- lament material is ejected and it is part of the ascending bright front whose evolution is seen in the following panels (e and f ). The full evolution can be followed in the AIA 304 movie accompanying this article as supplementary material (aia304.mp4). Notice also the far brightening located at the AR main negative polarity and indicated with white arrows in Figure 7d and f. As this area brightens consequently with the M4.1 are development, we infer that it is another kernel of the are, as we show in the description of Figure 8 in what follows. As observed in Figure 7e and f, and in the accompanying movie, the ejected material travels along magnetic loops connecting the area surrounding the bipoles with this far kernel. From the observed evolution of the ascending surge front in AIA 304 data we can estimate its velocity in the plane of the sky. By following the vertical motion of the bright front from the original location of the mini- lament to the maximum volumetric extent of the surge we estimate a mean velocity of approximately 280 km s . We obtained this velocity by tracking the front along successive images and then computing the slope of the position versus time curve, from the original lament location to the farthest position reached by the surge front. Although this velocity is higher than the 190 km s obtained for the 12:23 UT surge studied by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018), it is still within the usual values observed in this kind of events (Raoua et al., 2016). 11 Figure 5: SDO/AIA 304 images corresponding to the rst partial eruption of the northern section of the mini- lament. Times are indicated in the panels. The panels are squares with a side length of 270 Mm. (a) Includes  200 G HMI contours as reference. Red (blue) color corresponds to positive (negative) magnetic eld values. In (b) the mini- lament extending along the PIL of B1 is visible (see also Figure 6b). Two black arrows point to the northern portion of the mini- lament, which is oriented in the NE{SW direction, and to its southern section, which is oriented in the NW{SE direction. The two white arrows indicate the location of the circular brightening and another one located on the negative AR main polarity to the W (see text for details). (c) Shows two bright kernels that we consider to be the footpoints of a short arcade or set of loops formed as the northen section of the mini- lament erupts. (d) Corresponds to the time of maximum extension of the surge associated to this partial mini- lament eruption. Notice that the loops along which the plasma ows have footpoints at the location of the elongated brightening to the W. A movie showing the AIA 304 evolution of the C1.6 and M4.1 ares, as well as the partial mini- lament eruptions, is attached as electronic supplementary material (aia304.mp4). 12 Figure 6: Zoom of a portion of Figure 5a and b. (a) 20:20 UT HMI magnetogram shown as reference. We number the main polarities associated to the development of the analyzed ares and surges as described in Section 3. The polarity inversion line (PIL) of bipole B1 is indicated. (b) Location of the same polarities on the cotemporal AIA 304 image. We point the locations of the northern and southern portions of the erupting mini- lament (indicated as MF). We include a further enlargement of the big bipole area to easily identify both mini- lament portions, indicated as N (north) and S (south). 13 In order to identify the locations of the main M4.1 are kernels, we analyze AIA 1700 images. The C1.6 are is not visible in this AIA band. Figure 8 shows a series of images in AIA 1700. In Figure 8b{d the are kernels and their evolution is clearly seen. In Figure 8d we have labeled the di erent kernels using the same letters as L opez Fuentes et al. (2018) used in their analysis of the event at 12:23 UT. The location of the initial emission in this band, as well as its evolution, together with the AIA 304 evolution discussed in the previous paragraph, suggests that it is the southern section of the mini- lament that erupts in association with the M4.1 are. Notice that the far kernel to where the plasma is observed to ow in AIA 304 during this second mini- lament eruption is barely seen in this band. We include as supplementary material a movie with the highest temporal resolution in AIA 1700 showing the M4.1 are and the second mini- lament partial eruption (aia1700.mp4); in this movie we can see that some plasma appears owing up at this temperature range. Notice the bright kernels associated to the jet at the east of the AR (right at the left border of the images) that starts at approximately 20:45 UT. As we mentioned before, this event is unrelated to those studied here. As mentioned in L opez Fuentes et al. (2018), several EUV surges can be identi ed in AIA 304 when examining images in this band in Helioviewer (www.helioviewer.org). All these surges are associated to M-class ares, ex- cept the rst partial eruption studied in this article at  20:25 UT. The more extended surges are: one on 8 May at 13:05 UT ( are M1.4), another one on 9 May at  12:23 UT ( are M4.7, see L opez Fuentes et al., 2018), the one analyzed here at  21:01 UT ( are M4.1), and two on 10 May at 04:15 UT ( are M5.7, see Yang and Zhang, 2018) and at  20:25 UT ( are M1.7). All these M-class ares and surges started mainly at the location of the largest rotating bipole (B1) and the plasma was launched along large- scale loops with far footpoints on the negative main AR polarity to the W. This series of events suggests a recurrence of energy storage, mini- lament reformation as proposed by Chandra et al. (2017) (see also the simulations of Wyper et al., 2017, 2018), and energy release processes in a time range between around 8 and 23 hours. 2.4. EUV Evolution as Seen by STEREO-B As described in Section 2.1, at the time of the studied events the STEREO probe B was located in an orbital position from which AR 11576 was observ- able on the solar limb. This provides us the vantage point of a side view 14 Figure 7: Second surge and associated M4.1 are evolution as observed in AIA 304. (a) Includes  200 G HMI contours as reference. Red (blue) color corresponds to positive (negative) magnetic eld values. The panels are squares with a side length of 270 Mm. The black arrows in (b) and (c) indicate the location of the erupting mini- lament. The white arrows in (d) and (f ) indicate the location of a far are kernel on the negative main polarity of the AR. Notice the ascending material in (e) and (f ) that follows the AR loops connecting with the far kernel. The observed evolution can be more clearly followed in the accompanying movie (aia304.mp4). 15 Figure 8: SDO/AIA 1700 images of the M4.1 are. Times are indicated in the panels. (a) Includes  200 G HMI contours as reference. Red (blue) color corresponds to positive (negative) magnetic eld values. The panels are squares with a side length of 270 Mm. (b){ (f ) Show the evolution of the are kernels which can be identi ed in this band. (d) Shows the are kernels numbered using the same letters as in L opez Fuentes et al. (2018). A movie showing the AIA 1700 evolution of the are is attached as electronic supplementary material (aia1700.mp4). Figure 9: STEREO B observations obtained with the SECCHI instrument in the 195 A channel on 9 May 2012. (a) Corresponds to the location and illustrates the coronal loop structure of AR 11576, as seen on the limb from the STEREO B point of view before the events studied here. The cadence of these observations is 5 min. The panels are squares with a side of 340 Mm. The times of the images are indicated in the panels. In (b) and (c) we indicate with white arrows the location of the rst surge front as it erupts. In (d) we use a white arrow to identify the location of the mini- lament portion associated to the second surge. In (e) and (f ) the front of the second surge is indicated with white arrows 5 min and 10 min after the eruption begins. The associated M4.1 are is also observable as an extended area of saturated pixels at the base of the ejected structure. The full evolution observed from STEREO B can be seen in the accompanying movie (stereo195.mp4). 17 to observe the ejections. In Figure 9 we show a series of SECCHI images in the 195A band (hereafter SECCHI 195) covering both surge evolutions. The cadence of this set of images is 5 min. In Figure 9a we show an image of AR 11576 right before the rst event took place (at 20:20 UT). By 20:30 UT (Figure 9b) we identify a bright ascending front, indicated with a white arrow, that coresponds to our rst surge. It can be still observed progressing in Figure 9c (20:35 UT), where we identi ed the highest point of the surge front with a white arrow. Regarding the evolution of the second surge, in Figure 9d (21:00 UT), we point with a white arrow the location of the mini- lament portion associated to this eruption, as observed from STEREO. In Figure 9e and f (21:05 UT and 21:10 UT, respectively), the white arrows in- dicate the position of the ascending surge front. Notice the bright saturated pixels at the base of the erupting material produced by the associated M4.1 are. The evolution can be fully observed in the short movie accompanying this article as supplementary material (stereo195.mp4). Although the cadence of the SECCHI 195 data does not allow a continuous track of the erupted material as in the case of AIA 304, we can still observe the mini- lament just before the ejection begins and the ejected material at a high altitude 5 min later. Therefore, we can make a very rough estimation of the mean velocity of the surge by dividing the observed distance traveled by the material by the time di erence between the images in Figure 9d and f. The mean velocity estimated in this way is approximately 300 km s , which is consistent with the result obtained from the AIA 304 analysis. 3. Comparing the phenomenology of the con ned ejections on 9 May 2012 In this section we compare the con ned eruptions of 9 May 2012, which were associated to the M4.7, the C1.6, and M4.1 ares occurring at 12:23, 20:25, and 21:01 UT, respectively, as identi ed in Figure 1. In L opez Fuentes et al. (2018) we performed a detailed study of the magnetic eld connectivity in the regions where the are kernels were located and interpreted our ob- servational results in terms of the magnetic eld topology of AR 11576. We interpret the observations of the two successive ares and con ned eruptions, just discussed, in the context of our previous results in view that the mag- netic eld con guration has not changed substantially, i.e. the main change is the continuous rotation of B1 and B2. 18 Figure 10: 3D sketch showing sets of eld lines connecting the di erent polarities identi ed in Figure 6 and the relative location of the mini- lament. As the mini- lament rises two reconnection processes occur, as identi ed with thick green segments: the internal one below the mini- lament and the external one above it, which reconnects (blue) eld lines connecting polarities 3 and 4 with eld lines connecting 1 and 2. This latter process eventually yields the injection of mini- lament material in eld lines connecting 3 and 2 and 4 and 1 (highlighted in red color) producing the observed eruption. See Section 3 for a detailed description. 19 It is clear from Figure 5 that only the northern section of the mini- lament erupts at around 20:25 UT, when two small are kernels are seen at both sides of the northern section of the PIL of B1. A C1.6 are ac- companies the eruption; this is a faint event compared to the other ones on 9 May, in particular, it is not even classi ed as a are in SolarMoni- tor (https://www.solarmonitor.org/). Based on the magnetic eld topology computed in L opez Fuentes et al. (2018), the evolution seen in the movie that accompanies this article (aia304.mp4), and the di erent panels in Fig- ure 5, we infer that the continuous rotation of B1 and ux cancellation at its PIL, produces an instability triggering this ejection. When this happens, the mini- lament starts to rise and two reconnection processes set in. Magnetic eld lines connecting polarities 3 and 4 (see Figure 6a), at both sides of the PIL, reconnect below the mini- lament, in what is called internal reconnec- tion. Figure 10 shows a 3D sketch of the magnetic eld lines connecting the di erent polarities and the relative position of the mini- lament. The internal reconnection site is identi ed with a thick green segment below the mini- lament location in Figure 10. This process creates a new set of eld lines whose footpoints are located at both sides of the PIL, clearly seen in Figure 5c as the two bright kernels pointed with a white arrow. The other set of reconnected eld lines surrounds the mini- lament. Simultaneously, and as the mini- lament rises, the closed eld lines above it that still con- nect 3 and 4 are forced to reconnect with those connecting 2 and 1. This reconnection process is called external and is identi ed with a thick green segment above the mini- lament location in Figure 10. In this process the mini- lament plasma has access to the large-scale eld lines connecting 4 and 1 and we observe the surge owing towards the southern portion of the far kernel to the W in 1, pointed with a white arrow in Figure 5d. Notice that in this case the loops connecting 4 and 1 are shorter and probably not as high as those in the surge observed associated to the are at 12:23 UT and the later one at 21:01 UT. Because of the surge and other brightenings, the counterpart kernel in 4 is not evident in AIA images. At the same time we should have seen part of the mini- lament plasma reaching a are kernel located in 2, in a similar way as happens with the surge at 12:23 UT; however as these events are less energetic than the latter one, this is not visible in the 304 movie. Anyway, a are kernel is located in 2 at around 20:23 UT and later (see the white arrow to the east in Figure 5c. Summarizing, this fainter are and con ned ejection can be explained in a similar way as the events at 12:23 UT, but in this particular case only the northern portion of 20 the mini- lament is ejected. As we show in Figure 7 the origin of the events at 21:01 UT was the ejection of the southern portion of the mini- lament on the PIL of bipole B1. In this particular case, the are and eruption are homologous to the events studied by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018). In Figure 8b we have labeled the are kernels as k1, k2, k3 and k3', and k4 and k4', using the same notation as in that article. We associate these kernels to the location of the polarity regions labeled as shown in Figure 6a. Kernels k3'and k4' are located in polarities 3 and 4 and are the result of the internal reconnection process that sets in when the southern portion of the mini- lament destabilizes and starts rising. Kernels k4 and k1, as well as kernels k2 and k3, result from the external reconnection process when the loops above the rising mini- lament and linking polarities 3 and 4 reconnect with the overlying closed eld lines connecting 2 and 1 (see Figure 10). Finally, we notice that, even with the high spatial resolution of AIA im- ages, it is not clear if the mini- lament at the time of the events studied here is formed by two sections and, therefore, we have no clue of why the mini- lament erupts in two sections. 4. Concluding Remarks We studied a two-step mini- lament eruption in AR NOAA 11576 on 9 May 2012, at 20:25 UT and 21:01 UT. These eruptions were observed as EUV surges in SDO/AIA data and occurred in conjunction with a C1.6 and an M4.1 ares, identi ed in the GOES soft X-ray emission curve. We studied the evolution of the photospheric magnetic eld of the AR, observed in SDO/HMI magnetograms, and related these events to the rotation and ux cancellation of bipolar structures located in the middle of the AR main positive polarity. By identifying the are kernels and comparing them with the previous event at 12:23 UT, in Section 3 we propose a phenomenological explanation of both eruptions. This is done in terms of the ejection of two sections of a mini- lament located along the PIL of the largest rotating bipole, magnetic connections between the magnetic polarities of the AR con guration, and reconnection processes between eld lines connecting these polarities. The location of are kernels, the shape of the brightened structures, and the observed evolution suggest that the same magnetic topology found by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018) is present during the events studied in this article. 21 Except for the fact that the mini- lament material is ejected through closed magnetic eld lines that connect the main polarities of the AR, the studied events resemble the kind of evolution observed and modeled in previ- ous works for jets (see e.g. Sterling et al., 2016; Wyper et al., 2017, 2018, and other references in the Introduction), for which the material is ejected along open magnetic eld lines. Our study con rms the role of mini- laments in the development of jets and surges and contributes to understand the magnetic con gurations and evolution associated to this kind of events. In particular, we further con rm the suggestion proposed in previous works (see references in Section 1), that the repeated mini- lament reconstructions and eruptions accompanied by ares, as observed in AR 11576, are sustained by the con- tinuous rotation and ux cancellation of the bipolar structures located in the middle of the AR main positive polarity. Although our study focuses on events of the surge type, in which the ejected material falls back to the coronal base, the similarity of the processes producing the events analyzed here and jet observations (both standard and blow-out) studied elsewhere, suggest the possibility that other typical ejections, such as H sprays (see references in Section 1), might be produced by similar mechanisms. This possibility would need to be addressed in future high resolution studies of solar ejective phenomena. Acknowledgements The authors thank the anonymous reviewers for useful comments and suggestions. MLF, CHM and GC are members of the Carrera del Investigador Cient  co of the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient  cas y T ecnicas (CONICET) of Argentina. MP is a CONICET Fellow. MP, MLF, GC and CHM acknowledge nancial support from the Argentinean grant PICT 2012- 0973 (ANPCyT). References Adams, M., Sterling, A. C., Moore, R. L., Gary, G. A., Mar. 2014. A Small- scale Eruption Leading to a Blowout Macrospicule Jet in an On-disk Coro- nal Hole. Astrophys. J. 783, 11. Can eld, R. C., Reardon, K. P., Leka, K. D., Shibata, K., Yokoyama, T., Shimojo, M., Jun. 1996. H alpha Surges and X-Ray Jets in AR 7260. Astrophys. J. 464, 1016{1029. 22 Chandra, R., Mandrini, C. H., Schmieder, B., Joshi, B., Cristiani, G. D., Cremades, H., Pariat, E., Nuevo, F. A., Srivastava, A. K., Uddin, W., Feb. 2017. Blowout jets and impulsive eruptive ares in a bald-patch topology. Astron. Astrophys. 598, A41. Chandra, R., Pariat, E., Schmieder, B., Mandrini, C. H., Uddin, W., Jan. 2010. How Can a Negative Magnetic Helicity Active Region Generate a Positive Helicity Magnetic Cloud? Solar Phys. 261, 127{148. Cheng, X., Kliem, B., Ding, M. D., Mar 2018. Unambiguous Evidence of Filament Splitting-induced Partial Eruptions. Astrophys. J. 856, 48. Foukal, P. V., 2004. Solar Astrophysics, 2nd, Revised Edition. Golub, L., Deluca, E., Austin, G., Bookbinder, J., Caldwell, D., Cheimets, P., et al., Jun. 2007. The X-Ray Telescope (XRT) for the Hinode Mission. Solar Phys. 243, 63{86. Howard, R. A., Moses, J. D., Vourlidas, A., Newmark, J. S., Socker, D. G., Plunkett, S. P., et al., Apr. 2008. Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI). Space Sci. Rev. 136, 67{115. Joshi, N. C., Nishizuka, N., Filippov, B., Magara, T., Tlatov, A. G., May 2018. Flux rope breaking and formation of a rotating blowout jet. Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 476, 1286{1298. Karpen, J. T., Antiochos, S. K., DeVore, C. R., Nov. 2012. The Mecha- nisms for the Onset and Explosive Eruption of Coronal Mass Ejections and Eruptive Flares. Astrophys. J. 760, 81. Lemen, J. R., Title, A. M., Akin, D. J., Boerner, P. F., Chou, C., Drake, J. F., et al., Jan. 2012. The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Solar Phys. 275, 17{40. L opez Fuentes, M., Mandrini, C. H., Poisson, M., D emoulin, P., Cristiani, G., L opez, F. M., Luoni, M. L., Dec. 2018. Physical Processes Involved in the EUV \Surge" Event of 9 May 2012. Solar Phys. 293, 166. L opez Fuentes, M. C., Poisson, M., Mandrini, C. H., Luoni, M. L., Cristiani, G. D., D emoulin, P., Sep. 2015. An alisis de un evento eyectivo en una arcada cerrada (Analysis of an ejective event in a closed magnetic arcade). 23 In: Abstract in CRAAA. Vol. 58. p. 37. URL http://www.astronomiaargentina.org.ar/uploads/docs/ craaa58.pdf Moore, R. L., Sterling, A. C., Panesar, N. K., May 2018. Onset of the Mag- netic Explosion in Solar Polar Coronal X-Ray Jets. Astrophys. J. 859, Panesar, N. K., Sterling, A. C., Moore, R. L., Aug 2017. Magnetic Flux Cancellation as the Origin of Solar Quiet-region Pre-jet Mini laments. Astrophys. J. 844, 131. Panesar, N. K., Sterling, A. C., Moore, R. L., Chakrapani, P., Nov. 2016. Magnetic Flux Cancelation as the Trigger of Solar Quiet-region Coronal Jets. Astrophys. J. Lett. 832, L7. Poisson, M., Mandrini, C. H., D emoulin, P., L opez Fuentes, M., Mar. 2015. Evidence of Twisted Flux-Tube Emergence in Active Regions. Solar Phys. 290, 727{751. Raoua , N. E., Patsourakos, S., Pariat, E., Young, P. R., Sterling, A. C., Savcheva, A., Shimojo, M., Moreno-Insertis, F., DeVore, C. R., Archontis, V., T or ok, T., Mason, H., Curdt, W., Meyer, K., Dalmasse, K., Matsui, Y., Nov. 2016. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling. Space Sci. Rev. 201, 1{53. Scherrer, P. H., Schou, J., Bush, R. I., Kosovichev, A. G., Bogart, R. S., Hoeksema, J. T., et al., Jan. 2012. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Investigation for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Solar Phys. 275, 207{227. Schmieder, B., Mein, N., Shibata, K., van Driel-Gesztelyi, L., Kurokawa, H., Jan 1996. Chromospheric ejections and their signatures in X-ray observed by YOHKOH. Advances in Space Research 17 (4-5), 193{196. Shen, Y., Liu, Y., Su, J., Deng, Y., Feb. 2012. On a Coronal Blowout Jet: The First Observation of a Simultaneously Produced Bubble-like CME and a Jet-like CME in a Solar Event. Astrophys. J. 745, 164. 24 Sterling, A. C., Moore, R. L., Falconer, D. A., Adams, M., Jul. 2015. Small- scale lament eruptions as the driver of X-ray jets in solar coronal holes. Nature 523, 437{440. Sterling, A. C., Moore, R. L., Falconer, D. A., Panesar, N. K., Akiyama, S., Yashiro, S., Gopalswamy, N., Apr. 2016. Mini lament Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region. Astrophys. J. 821, 100. Tripathi, D., Isobe, H., Mason, H. E., Jul 2006. On the propagation of bright- ening after lament/prominence eruptions, as seen by SoHO-EIT. Astron. Astrophys. 453, 1111{1116. Webb, D. F., Howard, T. A., Jun. 2012. Coronal Mass Ejections: Observa- tions. Living Reviews in Solar Physics 9, 3. Webb, D. F., Jackson, B. V., Oct 1981. Kinematical Analysis of Flare Spray Ejecta Observed in the Corona. Solar Phys. 73 (2), 341{361. Wyper, P. F., Antiochos, S. K., DeVore, C. R., Apr. 2017. A universal model for solar eruptions. Nature 544, 452{455. Wyper, P. F., DeVore, C. R., Antiochos, S. K., Jan. 2018. A Breakout Model for Solar Coronal Jets with Filaments. Astrophys. J. 852, 98. Yang, S., Zhang, J., Jun. 2018. Mini- lament Eruptions Triggering Con ned Solar Flares Observed by ONSET and SDO. Astrophys. J. Lett. 860, L25. Zuccarello, F., Romano, P., Farnik, F., Karlicky, M., Contarino, L., Bat- tiato, V., Guglielmino, S. L., Comparato, M., Ugarte-Urra, I., Jan 2009. The X17.2 are occurred in NOAA 10486: an example of lament desta- bilization caused by a domino e ect. Astron. Astrophys. 493, 629{637. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Astrophysics arXiv (Cornell University)

Two successive partial mini-filament confined ejections

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Abstract

Active region (AR) NOAA 11476 produced a series of con ned plasma ejec- tions, mostly accompanied by ares of X-ray class M, from 08 to 10 May 2012. The structure and evolution of the con ned ejections resemble that of EUV surges; however, their origin is associated to the destabilization and eruption of a mini- lament, which lay along the photospheric inversion line (PIL) of a large rotating bipole. Our analysis indicate that the bipole rota- tion and ux cancellation along the PIL have a main role in destabilizing the structure and triggering the ejections. The observed bipole emerged within the main following AR polarity. Previous studies have analyzed and dis- cussed in detail two events of this series in which the mini- lament erupted as a whole, one at 12:23 UT on 09 May and the other at 04:18 UT on 10 May. In this article we present the observations of the con ned eruption and M4.1 are on 09 May 2012 at 21:01 UT (SOL2012-05-09T21:01:00) and the previous activity in which the mini- lament was involved. For the analysis we use data in multiple wavelengths (UV, EUV, X-rays, and magnetograms) from space instruments. In this particular case, the mini- lament is seen to erupt in two di erent sections. The northern section erupted accompanied by a C1.6 are and the southern section did it in association with the M4.1 Corresponding author Email address: lopezf@iafe.uba.ar (M. L opez Fuentes) Fellow of CONICET, Argentina Member of the Carrera del Investigador Cient  co, CONICET, Argentina Preprint submitted to Advances in Space Research November 5, 2019 arXiv:1911.00901v1 [astro-ph.SR] 3 Nov 2019 are. The global structure and direction of both con ned ejections and the location of a far are kernel, to where the plasma is seen to ow, suggest that both ejections and ares follow a similar underlying mechanism. Keywords: Solar Physics, Solar activity, Solar ares, Solar ultraviolet emission, Solar X-ray and gamma-ray emission PACS: 96.60.-j, 96.60.Q-, 96.50.qe, 96.60.Tf, *96.60.tj, 96.60.Tf, *96.60.tk 1. Introduction Solar activity produces several kinds of ejecta from full- edge coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to surges, jets, and sprays. These ejections are character- ized by their evolution, observed size, geometry, associated energies, and masses involved, and sometimes are classi ed considering the instruments with which they have been observed (Webb and Howard, 2012; Raoua et al., 2016; Can eld et al., 1996; Schmieder et al., 1996). For instance, the classi - cation of phenomena like surges and sprays has its origin in H observations (see e.g. Foukal, 2004). The main di erence between them is that while ma- terial in surges falls back down through the same magnetic structure through which it was ejected, in sprays the ejected mass apparently reaches escape velocity continuously ascending away from its point of origin in the chromo- sphere or very low corona (see Webb and Jackson, 1981). Recent investigations have associated coronal jets to the eruption of so- called mini- laments, whose plasma provides most of the ejected material (Shen et al., 2012; Adams et al., 2014; Sterling et al., 2015, 2016; Panesar et al., 2016; Joshi et al., 2018; Yang and Zhang, 2018; Moore et al., 2018). Even in cases of lower resolution observations, mini- lament reformation and eruption has been postulated as the origin of a series of blow-out jets and re- lated events (Chandra et al., 2017). In all the previous works, the mechanism proposed for the destabilization of the mini- lament is the magnetic ux can- cellation along the polarity inversion line (PIL) above which the mini- lament lays. Given the appropriate magnetic con guration, two reconnection pro- cesses may occur: a rst, "inner", reconnection process in the magnetic eld below the mini- lament, usually associated to a are, and a second, "exter- nal" process produced by the ascent of the mini- lament, whose supporting magnetic eld lines reconnect with the ones of the overlying magnetic eld yielding the injection of material into open lines producing the jet (Sterling et al., 2016). 2 The role of mini- laments in the process just described led Wyper et al. (2017, 2018) to suggest that jets are produced by the same kind of mechanism, namely breakout reconnection, proposed to explain larger scale phenomena like CMEs (see e.g. Karpen et al., 2012). The numerical con guration in those simulations consists of a magnetic bipole emerging in a uniform unipolar magnetic ux area. This kind of con guration leads to the appearence of a coronal null-point above the bipole. Shearing motions imposed on the system provide free magnetic energy and produce a small ux rope that supports the mini- lament. The sheared magnetic structure expands and a reconnection process is triggered in the region around the coronal null point. As in the classical breakout model of CMEs, the reconnection removes part of the eld restraining the ux rope, so it is propeled to rapidly ascend. At the same time, reconnection below the twisted ux rope is stimulated, consistently with the phenomenology described in the previous paragraph. It has been observed in occasions that only part of the full structure of the lament is ejected (see e.g. Cheng et al., 2018, and references therein). In those cases, the lament splits in two or more segments, some of which erupt at di erent times or not at all (Zuccarello et al., 2009; Tripathi et al., 2006; Chandra et al., 2010). This behaviour has been identi ed also in the case of mini- lament eruptions associated to coronal jets (see e.g. Panesar et al., 2017). The ejections studied in this article occurred in a similar magnetic con g- uration to that proposed to explain coronal jets, i.e. the presence of bipolar structures in the middle of a more extended unipolar region, in this case, the extended following polarity of active region (AR) NOAA 11576. A large mag- netic bipole is observed to rotate along serveral tens of hours accompanied by a series of eruptions associated to ares. One of these, which occurred on 09 May 2012 at 12:23 UT, has been extensively analyzed by us in previous articles (L opez Fuentes et al., 2015; L opez Fuentes et al., 2018), and another, which occurred on 10 May 2012 04:18 UT, was studied by Yang and Zhang (2018). The main di erence between the events studied here and a regular jet is that the ejected material remained con ned within the closed magnetic structure of the AR instead of reaching open eld lines. After the eruption, the ejected material ascended along eld lines that connected the main po- larities of the AR, part of it reached the farther footpoints of the lines, and part of it fell back to the region where the ejection initiated. This observed evolution resembled that of H and EUV surges (see the aforementioned references). 3 The main EUV event analyzed here occurred in AR 11576 on 09 May 2012 and was associated to an M4.1 are with a peak in GOES soft X-ray light curve at  21:01 UT. A close inspection of high resolution observations pre- vious to the event, in the 304 A band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA: Lemen et al., 2012), onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), indicates the presence of a mini- lament whose following eruption, accompa- nied by reconnection with the overlaying eld, constitutes the main source of the ejected material. The extended analysis some tens of minutes before the main M4.1 event indicates that a previous smaller ejection ocurred 36 min before, involving the eruption of a di erent section of the same mini- lament. This previous event was associated to a less energetic C1.6 are with peak intensity at  20:25 UT. In Sections 2.2{2.4, we analyze the evolution of both con ned eruptions and accompanying ares in several wavelengths using data from the instru- ments described in Section 2.1. In Section 3 we compare these successive events with the one analyzed by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018) and interperet our observations in the frame of that study. In Section 4 we present our concluding remarks. 2. Observations and Characteristics of the Events 2.1. The Data Used To study the ares and con ned eruptions we use UV continuum and EUV data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA: Lemen et al., 2012), onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and EUV observations from the Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI: Howard et al., 2008), onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft B, soft X-ray data from the X-ray Telescope (XRT: Golub et al., 2007) onboard Hinode, and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI: Scherrer et al., 2012), onboard SDO. Figure 1 depicts the soft X-ray curve in the 1 { 8 A channel, where we have identi ed with arrows and labels both aring events, as well as the one that occurred at 12:23 UT (L opez Fuentes et al., 2018), and the one that occurred at 04:18 UT on May 10 (Yang and Zhang, 2018). SDO/AIA data are from the 1700 A channel (from now on AIA 1700, T  5000 K) and 304 A channel (AIA 304, T  510 K). Both events are observed in AIA 304, while only the are at 21:01 UT is observed in AIA 1700. We select subimages containing AR 11576 from full-disk data for 4 the temporal range covering the analyzed events. We coalign the subimages and construct movies that are associated to the gures of Section 2.3. All images are displayed in logarithmic intensity scales for better contrast. We complement the SDO/AIA EUV data with images of the events from the 195 A channel of the SECCHI instrument. We use this band because it has the highest temporal resolution (5 minutes) in SECCHI. On the day of our events, STEREO-B was at an Earth ecliptic (HEE) longitude of -118 away from Earth, from this location AR 11576 was seen in the solar limb. SDO/HMI data are line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms, which are selected from full-disk images to study the evolution of the AR magnetic eld (see Section 2.2). 2.2. Summary of the Photospheric Magnetic Field Evolution The magnetic evolution of AR 11476 from appearance, on the eastern solar limb, on 04 May 2012 until the end of 10 May has been discussed in detail by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018). We summarize here their main results. AR 11476 had a global bipolar structure; its preceding negative polarity was compact and was followed by a very dispersed following positive polarity (see Figure 2). By 7 May two bipoles, which we have labeled as B1 and B2 in Figure 2, were seen in the middle of the AR main positive polarity. The magnetogram in this gure corresponds to 20:00 UT, 25 min before the rst event analyzed here. In the panels of Figure 3 we show the bipole orientations at the times of particular events. Figure 3a corresponds roughly to the time of GOES soft X-ray peak of the M4.7 are on 9 May at 12:23 UT, Figure 3b to approximately the time of GOES peak of the M4.1 are analyzed in this article, Figure 3c depicts the bipole locations at approximately the time of an M5.7 are peak at 04:18 UT on 10 May, while the last panel shows the magnetic con guration of the AR much later, when both bipoles had long ago stopped rotating and the negative polarity of B1 had almost disappeared. Both ares studied here and their related con ned eruptions or surges, originated in the neighborhood of B1 and B2. The bipoles, B1 and B2 were seen rotating clockwise. B1 rotated by  180 from 8 May at 00:00 UT to 10 May at 22:00 UT, while B2 rotated by  100 from the same starting time until  10:00 UT on 10 May. The rotation of each bipole is characterized by the rotation of their tilt angle, which is deter- mined following the method developed by Poisson et al. (2015). We include a movie showing the bipole rotations (bipole-rotation.mov) as supplementary material. The bipole rotations imply the injection of magnetic helicity and Figure 1: GOES soft X-ray curve in the 1 { 8 A channel showing the two aring events after  20:20 UT on 9 May 2012. The arrows point to their peak times. Each arrow is accompanied by labels indicating the X-ray class and time of the ares. As a reference we identify the peak of the event at 12:23 UT that was studied by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018) and that of the event at 4:18 UT studied by Yang and Zhang (2018). The peak between the C1.6 and M4.1 ares, indicated with a red arrow, corresponds to a are associated to the neighboring jet that occurred next to AR 11576 to the east at 20:45 UT and that is mentioned in Section 2.3. 6 Figure 2: SDO/HMI magnetogram of AR 11576 on 9 May at 20:00 UT, previous to the rst event analyzed here. The eld of view of the image covers approximately 260 Mm by 220 Mm. The location of bipoles B1 and B2 are indicated surrounded by a black box and corresponding labels. The events studied here occurred at the location of these bipoles. 7 Figure 3: SDO/HMI close-up magnetogram views of the bipoles shown in Figure 2. The arrows in panel a point to the locations of the bipoles. Panels a { c correspond approxi- mately to the times of the M ares on 9 and 10 May, while panel d shows the AR when B1 had almost completely disappeared. Blue corresponds to negative magnetic eld and red to positive eld. The magnetic eld contours in pink correspond to 200 G. The axes are in arcsec. The black and white dots correspond to the location of the negative and positive magnetic barycenters of bipole B1, computed following the method described by Poisson et al. (2015). The evolution of the black segment joining the barycenters of B1 indicates the variation of the bipole tilt angle, de ned here in the usual way, accordingly to Joy's law, as the bipole inclination with respect to the solar equator. A movie show- ing this rotation along three days is appended to this article as supplementary material (bipole-rotation.mov). 8 Figure 4: Tilt angle rotation (black curve) and evolution of the magnetic ux of B1 (positive ux in red and negative in blue). Computations are done for values of the eld above (below) 500 G (-500 G). consequently the accumulation of free magnetic energy; this evolution might contribute to the destabilization and eruption of the mini- lament during all the observed ares as proposed by Wyper et al. (2017, 2018). Furthermore, as we measured the bipole rotations, we also computed their magnetic ux. We found that the uxes of B1 and B2 decreased steeply. In the case of B1 its ux mainly cancelled with the surrounding magnetic eld, while in the case of B2 it was probably mostly dispersed. As discussed in Section 1, magnetic ux cancellation has been observed associated with surges and jets. Figure 4 depicts the rotation of the tilt angle and the magnetic ux evolution of B1 from 8 May to 10 May. B1 is the largest and main bipole involved in the events studied in this article. 2.3. UV Continuum and EUV Evolution as Seen from Earth Figures 5 and 7 show AIA 304 images at the times of the rst partial mini- lament eruption and accompanying C1.6 are, and of the M4.1 are and second partial mini- lament eruption, respectively. An HMI magnetogram contour is overlaid on the images in Figure 5a and Figure 7a as a reference. 9 As discussed in Section 1, recent observations relate jets to the eruption of mini- laments, which are smaller versions of normal large-scale laments. In the events analyzed in this article we nd evidence of the partial eruption of a curved mini- lament that extends all along the PIL of B1. This mini- lament is observed to erupt and reform several times from 8 May to 10 May. We infer that the continuous rotation and ux cancellation of B1 along these days contribute to the mini- lament reformation and destabilization. We include as supplementary material a movie with high temporal resolution (5 images per minute) in AIA 304 showing both ares and mini- lament eruptions (aia304.mp4). In the movie a jet is also observed at the east of the AR (right at the left border of the images) occurring around 20:45 UT. This event is unrelated to those studied here as it occurred away from the bipole areas where the mini- lament eruptions and ares took place. A are associated to this jet is identi ed in Figure 1 with a red arrow (no label) between the C1.6 and M4.1 ares. Figure 5 illustrates the initiation and evolution of the rst event. High resolution imagers, like SDO/AIA, allow us to clearly observe a curved dark structure with one section oriented in the NE{SW direction (henceforth, the northern section) and another oriented in the NW-SE direction (henceforth, the southern section, see also Figure 6b). These two sections have been pointed with black arrows in Figure 5b. Figure 5c shows the appearance of two bright kernels (indicated with a white arrow) that we consider to be the footpoints of a short arcade formed as the mini- lament northern section erupts. At the same time, a dense plasma eruption is seen extending towards the W. Figure 5d shows the eruption at its maximum extension reaching a far kernel, indicated with a white arrow, that globally has the same shape as the far kernel observed during the earlier event at 12:23 UT. Another elongated brightening, pointed by a white arrow in Figure 5b and d, is also seen to the W on the main negative AR polarity. The location of the rst are kernels, as well as the place from where the mini- lament eruption initiates, indicates that only the northern section of the mini- lament erupts. In Figure 6 we show an enlargement of the image in Figure 5a and b. Figure 6a shows the magnetic map as a reference. In this panel we have numbered the main polarities involved in the events studied in this arti- cle. Figure 6b corresponds to the AIA 304 image where the shape of the mini- lament before both eruptions can be more clearly seen. For an eas- ier identi cation of the mini- lament portions we added an inset showing a further enlargement of the bipole area. The north and south portions for 10 the mini- lament are indicated both in Figure 6b and in the inset. Notice the presence of a circular-shape brightening, pointed by a white arrow in Figure 5b (also observable in Figure 6b), that surrounds all the negative and part of the postitive polarity of B1 and all of B2, as happened in the event at 12:23 UT. This circular brightening is present since around 08 May, which strongly suggests that energy release at a very low rate occurred accompa- nying the rotation of the bipoles plausibly because of their interaction with the overlaying magnetic eld. Figure 7 shows the evolution of the second surge and associated M4.1 are as observed in the AIA 304 band. As in Figure 5, in Figure 7a we include an SDO/HMI contour as a reference to easily identify the location of the main AR polarities and B1 and B2 bipoles. In Figure 7b we indicate with a black arrow the remaining southern portion of the mini- lament, which is seen prominently right before starting to rise. In Figure 7c, the mini- lament is observed already ascending and an incipient brightening is noticeable below it. In Figure 7d, all the area around B1 is seen bright as the peak intensity of the are happens. The mini- lament material is ejected and it is part of the ascending bright front whose evolution is seen in the following panels (e and f ). The full evolution can be followed in the AIA 304 movie accompanying this article as supplementary material (aia304.mp4). Notice also the far brightening located at the AR main negative polarity and indicated with white arrows in Figure 7d and f. As this area brightens consequently with the M4.1 are development, we infer that it is another kernel of the are, as we show in the description of Figure 8 in what follows. As observed in Figure 7e and f, and in the accompanying movie, the ejected material travels along magnetic loops connecting the area surrounding the bipoles with this far kernel. From the observed evolution of the ascending surge front in AIA 304 data we can estimate its velocity in the plane of the sky. By following the vertical motion of the bright front from the original location of the mini- lament to the maximum volumetric extent of the surge we estimate a mean velocity of approximately 280 km s . We obtained this velocity by tracking the front along successive images and then computing the slope of the position versus time curve, from the original lament location to the farthest position reached by the surge front. Although this velocity is higher than the 190 km s obtained for the 12:23 UT surge studied by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018), it is still within the usual values observed in this kind of events (Raoua et al., 2016). 11 Figure 5: SDO/AIA 304 images corresponding to the rst partial eruption of the northern section of the mini- lament. Times are indicated in the panels. The panels are squares with a side length of 270 Mm. (a) Includes  200 G HMI contours as reference. Red (blue) color corresponds to positive (negative) magnetic eld values. In (b) the mini- lament extending along the PIL of B1 is visible (see also Figure 6b). Two black arrows point to the northern portion of the mini- lament, which is oriented in the NE{SW direction, and to its southern section, which is oriented in the NW{SE direction. The two white arrows indicate the location of the circular brightening and another one located on the negative AR main polarity to the W (see text for details). (c) Shows two bright kernels that we consider to be the footpoints of a short arcade or set of loops formed as the northen section of the mini- lament erupts. (d) Corresponds to the time of maximum extension of the surge associated to this partial mini- lament eruption. Notice that the loops along which the plasma ows have footpoints at the location of the elongated brightening to the W. A movie showing the AIA 304 evolution of the C1.6 and M4.1 ares, as well as the partial mini- lament eruptions, is attached as electronic supplementary material (aia304.mp4). 12 Figure 6: Zoom of a portion of Figure 5a and b. (a) 20:20 UT HMI magnetogram shown as reference. We number the main polarities associated to the development of the analyzed ares and surges as described in Section 3. The polarity inversion line (PIL) of bipole B1 is indicated. (b) Location of the same polarities on the cotemporal AIA 304 image. We point the locations of the northern and southern portions of the erupting mini- lament (indicated as MF). We include a further enlargement of the big bipole area to easily identify both mini- lament portions, indicated as N (north) and S (south). 13 In order to identify the locations of the main M4.1 are kernels, we analyze AIA 1700 images. The C1.6 are is not visible in this AIA band. Figure 8 shows a series of images in AIA 1700. In Figure 8b{d the are kernels and their evolution is clearly seen. In Figure 8d we have labeled the di erent kernels using the same letters as L opez Fuentes et al. (2018) used in their analysis of the event at 12:23 UT. The location of the initial emission in this band, as well as its evolution, together with the AIA 304 evolution discussed in the previous paragraph, suggests that it is the southern section of the mini- lament that erupts in association with the M4.1 are. Notice that the far kernel to where the plasma is observed to ow in AIA 304 during this second mini- lament eruption is barely seen in this band. We include as supplementary material a movie with the highest temporal resolution in AIA 1700 showing the M4.1 are and the second mini- lament partial eruption (aia1700.mp4); in this movie we can see that some plasma appears owing up at this temperature range. Notice the bright kernels associated to the jet at the east of the AR (right at the left border of the images) that starts at approximately 20:45 UT. As we mentioned before, this event is unrelated to those studied here. As mentioned in L opez Fuentes et al. (2018), several EUV surges can be identi ed in AIA 304 when examining images in this band in Helioviewer (www.helioviewer.org). All these surges are associated to M-class ares, ex- cept the rst partial eruption studied in this article at  20:25 UT. The more extended surges are: one on 8 May at 13:05 UT ( are M1.4), another one on 9 May at  12:23 UT ( are M4.7, see L opez Fuentes et al., 2018), the one analyzed here at  21:01 UT ( are M4.1), and two on 10 May at 04:15 UT ( are M5.7, see Yang and Zhang, 2018) and at  20:25 UT ( are M1.7). All these M-class ares and surges started mainly at the location of the largest rotating bipole (B1) and the plasma was launched along large- scale loops with far footpoints on the negative main AR polarity to the W. This series of events suggests a recurrence of energy storage, mini- lament reformation as proposed by Chandra et al. (2017) (see also the simulations of Wyper et al., 2017, 2018), and energy release processes in a time range between around 8 and 23 hours. 2.4. EUV Evolution as Seen by STEREO-B As described in Section 2.1, at the time of the studied events the STEREO probe B was located in an orbital position from which AR 11576 was observ- able on the solar limb. This provides us the vantage point of a side view 14 Figure 7: Second surge and associated M4.1 are evolution as observed in AIA 304. (a) Includes  200 G HMI contours as reference. Red (blue) color corresponds to positive (negative) magnetic eld values. The panels are squares with a side length of 270 Mm. The black arrows in (b) and (c) indicate the location of the erupting mini- lament. The white arrows in (d) and (f ) indicate the location of a far are kernel on the negative main polarity of the AR. Notice the ascending material in (e) and (f ) that follows the AR loops connecting with the far kernel. The observed evolution can be more clearly followed in the accompanying movie (aia304.mp4). 15 Figure 8: SDO/AIA 1700 images of the M4.1 are. Times are indicated in the panels. (a) Includes  200 G HMI contours as reference. Red (blue) color corresponds to positive (negative) magnetic eld values. The panels are squares with a side length of 270 Mm. (b){ (f ) Show the evolution of the are kernels which can be identi ed in this band. (d) Shows the are kernels numbered using the same letters as in L opez Fuentes et al. (2018). A movie showing the AIA 1700 evolution of the are is attached as electronic supplementary material (aia1700.mp4). Figure 9: STEREO B observations obtained with the SECCHI instrument in the 195 A channel on 9 May 2012. (a) Corresponds to the location and illustrates the coronal loop structure of AR 11576, as seen on the limb from the STEREO B point of view before the events studied here. The cadence of these observations is 5 min. The panels are squares with a side of 340 Mm. The times of the images are indicated in the panels. In (b) and (c) we indicate with white arrows the location of the rst surge front as it erupts. In (d) we use a white arrow to identify the location of the mini- lament portion associated to the second surge. In (e) and (f ) the front of the second surge is indicated with white arrows 5 min and 10 min after the eruption begins. The associated M4.1 are is also observable as an extended area of saturated pixels at the base of the ejected structure. The full evolution observed from STEREO B can be seen in the accompanying movie (stereo195.mp4). 17 to observe the ejections. In Figure 9 we show a series of SECCHI images in the 195A band (hereafter SECCHI 195) covering both surge evolutions. The cadence of this set of images is 5 min. In Figure 9a we show an image of AR 11576 right before the rst event took place (at 20:20 UT). By 20:30 UT (Figure 9b) we identify a bright ascending front, indicated with a white arrow, that coresponds to our rst surge. It can be still observed progressing in Figure 9c (20:35 UT), where we identi ed the highest point of the surge front with a white arrow. Regarding the evolution of the second surge, in Figure 9d (21:00 UT), we point with a white arrow the location of the mini- lament portion associated to this eruption, as observed from STEREO. In Figure 9e and f (21:05 UT and 21:10 UT, respectively), the white arrows in- dicate the position of the ascending surge front. Notice the bright saturated pixels at the base of the erupting material produced by the associated M4.1 are. The evolution can be fully observed in the short movie accompanying this article as supplementary material (stereo195.mp4). Although the cadence of the SECCHI 195 data does not allow a continuous track of the erupted material as in the case of AIA 304, we can still observe the mini- lament just before the ejection begins and the ejected material at a high altitude 5 min later. Therefore, we can make a very rough estimation of the mean velocity of the surge by dividing the observed distance traveled by the material by the time di erence between the images in Figure 9d and f. The mean velocity estimated in this way is approximately 300 km s , which is consistent with the result obtained from the AIA 304 analysis. 3. Comparing the phenomenology of the con ned ejections on 9 May 2012 In this section we compare the con ned eruptions of 9 May 2012, which were associated to the M4.7, the C1.6, and M4.1 ares occurring at 12:23, 20:25, and 21:01 UT, respectively, as identi ed in Figure 1. In L opez Fuentes et al. (2018) we performed a detailed study of the magnetic eld connectivity in the regions where the are kernels were located and interpreted our ob- servational results in terms of the magnetic eld topology of AR 11576. We interpret the observations of the two successive ares and con ned eruptions, just discussed, in the context of our previous results in view that the mag- netic eld con guration has not changed substantially, i.e. the main change is the continuous rotation of B1 and B2. 18 Figure 10: 3D sketch showing sets of eld lines connecting the di erent polarities identi ed in Figure 6 and the relative location of the mini- lament. As the mini- lament rises two reconnection processes occur, as identi ed with thick green segments: the internal one below the mini- lament and the external one above it, which reconnects (blue) eld lines connecting polarities 3 and 4 with eld lines connecting 1 and 2. This latter process eventually yields the injection of mini- lament material in eld lines connecting 3 and 2 and 4 and 1 (highlighted in red color) producing the observed eruption. See Section 3 for a detailed description. 19 It is clear from Figure 5 that only the northern section of the mini- lament erupts at around 20:25 UT, when two small are kernels are seen at both sides of the northern section of the PIL of B1. A C1.6 are ac- companies the eruption; this is a faint event compared to the other ones on 9 May, in particular, it is not even classi ed as a are in SolarMoni- tor (https://www.solarmonitor.org/). Based on the magnetic eld topology computed in L opez Fuentes et al. (2018), the evolution seen in the movie that accompanies this article (aia304.mp4), and the di erent panels in Fig- ure 5, we infer that the continuous rotation of B1 and ux cancellation at its PIL, produces an instability triggering this ejection. When this happens, the mini- lament starts to rise and two reconnection processes set in. Magnetic eld lines connecting polarities 3 and 4 (see Figure 6a), at both sides of the PIL, reconnect below the mini- lament, in what is called internal reconnec- tion. Figure 10 shows a 3D sketch of the magnetic eld lines connecting the di erent polarities and the relative position of the mini- lament. The internal reconnection site is identi ed with a thick green segment below the mini- lament location in Figure 10. This process creates a new set of eld lines whose footpoints are located at both sides of the PIL, clearly seen in Figure 5c as the two bright kernels pointed with a white arrow. The other set of reconnected eld lines surrounds the mini- lament. Simultaneously, and as the mini- lament rises, the closed eld lines above it that still con- nect 3 and 4 are forced to reconnect with those connecting 2 and 1. This reconnection process is called external and is identi ed with a thick green segment above the mini- lament location in Figure 10. In this process the mini- lament plasma has access to the large-scale eld lines connecting 4 and 1 and we observe the surge owing towards the southern portion of the far kernel to the W in 1, pointed with a white arrow in Figure 5d. Notice that in this case the loops connecting 4 and 1 are shorter and probably not as high as those in the surge observed associated to the are at 12:23 UT and the later one at 21:01 UT. Because of the surge and other brightenings, the counterpart kernel in 4 is not evident in AIA images. At the same time we should have seen part of the mini- lament plasma reaching a are kernel located in 2, in a similar way as happens with the surge at 12:23 UT; however as these events are less energetic than the latter one, this is not visible in the 304 movie. Anyway, a are kernel is located in 2 at around 20:23 UT and later (see the white arrow to the east in Figure 5c. Summarizing, this fainter are and con ned ejection can be explained in a similar way as the events at 12:23 UT, but in this particular case only the northern portion of 20 the mini- lament is ejected. As we show in Figure 7 the origin of the events at 21:01 UT was the ejection of the southern portion of the mini- lament on the PIL of bipole B1. In this particular case, the are and eruption are homologous to the events studied by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018). In Figure 8b we have labeled the are kernels as k1, k2, k3 and k3', and k4 and k4', using the same notation as in that article. We associate these kernels to the location of the polarity regions labeled as shown in Figure 6a. Kernels k3'and k4' are located in polarities 3 and 4 and are the result of the internal reconnection process that sets in when the southern portion of the mini- lament destabilizes and starts rising. Kernels k4 and k1, as well as kernels k2 and k3, result from the external reconnection process when the loops above the rising mini- lament and linking polarities 3 and 4 reconnect with the overlying closed eld lines connecting 2 and 1 (see Figure 10). Finally, we notice that, even with the high spatial resolution of AIA im- ages, it is not clear if the mini- lament at the time of the events studied here is formed by two sections and, therefore, we have no clue of why the mini- lament erupts in two sections. 4. Concluding Remarks We studied a two-step mini- lament eruption in AR NOAA 11576 on 9 May 2012, at 20:25 UT and 21:01 UT. These eruptions were observed as EUV surges in SDO/AIA data and occurred in conjunction with a C1.6 and an M4.1 ares, identi ed in the GOES soft X-ray emission curve. We studied the evolution of the photospheric magnetic eld of the AR, observed in SDO/HMI magnetograms, and related these events to the rotation and ux cancellation of bipolar structures located in the middle of the AR main positive polarity. By identifying the are kernels and comparing them with the previous event at 12:23 UT, in Section 3 we propose a phenomenological explanation of both eruptions. This is done in terms of the ejection of two sections of a mini- lament located along the PIL of the largest rotating bipole, magnetic connections between the magnetic polarities of the AR con guration, and reconnection processes between eld lines connecting these polarities. The location of are kernels, the shape of the brightened structures, and the observed evolution suggest that the same magnetic topology found by L opez Fuentes et al. (2018) is present during the events studied in this article. 21 Except for the fact that the mini- lament material is ejected through closed magnetic eld lines that connect the main polarities of the AR, the studied events resemble the kind of evolution observed and modeled in previ- ous works for jets (see e.g. Sterling et al., 2016; Wyper et al., 2017, 2018, and other references in the Introduction), for which the material is ejected along open magnetic eld lines. Our study con rms the role of mini- laments in the development of jets and surges and contributes to understand the magnetic con gurations and evolution associated to this kind of events. In particular, we further con rm the suggestion proposed in previous works (see references in Section 1), that the repeated mini- lament reconstructions and eruptions accompanied by ares, as observed in AR 11576, are sustained by the con- tinuous rotation and ux cancellation of the bipolar structures located in the middle of the AR main positive polarity. Although our study focuses on events of the surge type, in which the ejected material falls back to the coronal base, the similarity of the processes producing the events analyzed here and jet observations (both standard and blow-out) studied elsewhere, suggest the possibility that other typical ejections, such as H sprays (see references in Section 1), might be produced by similar mechanisms. This possibility would need to be addressed in future high resolution studies of solar ejective phenomena. Acknowledgements The authors thank the anonymous reviewers for useful comments and suggestions. 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AstrophysicsarXiv (Cornell University)

Published: Nov 3, 2019

References