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Multiple string LED driver with flexible and high performance PWM dimming control

Multiple string LED driver with flexible and high performance PWM dimming control Multiple String LED Driver with Flexible and High Performance PWM Dimming Control M. Tahan, Student Member, IEEE, T. Hu, Senior, IEEE  the forward current to a desired value. In a configuration with Abstract— The main objectives in driving multiple LED parallel strings, current balance mechanism is usually utilized strings include achieving uniform current control and high to achieve uniform brightness. performance PWM dimming for all strings. This work proposes a In view of these concerns, advanced control strategies have new multiple string LED driver to achieve not only current been developed, along with complex driver configurations. In balance, but also flexible and wide range PWM dimming ratio conventional balancing method a resistor is placed in series for each string. A compact single-inductor multiple-output with each string to minimize the current difference [5, 6]. topology is adopted in the driver, accompanied by synchronous integrators and variable dimming frequency, to achieve both However, the series current sense resistor may cause high efficiency and high performance dimming. By using the significant power loss and poor efficiency. To reduce such a proposed variable dimming frequency scheme, high dimming power loss, reactive balancing method is proposed in [7-9], frequency is applied to a string with high dimming ratio, which and [10]. Resonant capacitors in series with the common- helps to maintain the deviation of LED string current in an mode choke and a two output rectifier structure is proposed in acceptable range, while low dimming frequency is applied to a string with low dimming ratio, which helps to achieve [9], where the currents of the two outputs can be automatically rectangular LED current waveform. Meanwhile, the new time balanced due to the charge balancing of the resonant multiplexing control scheme automatically optimizes the LED capacitors. In order to extend this configuration to 2n outputs, strings’ bus voltages, thus minimizes each string’s power loss. A n separated transformers with all primary side windings three string LED driver prototype is constructed to validate the connected in series are needed [11]. In [10], a lossless reactive effectiveness of the proposed control scheme, where the three component drives the LEDs by an AC source coupled with a strings can have different dimming ratios between 4% and 100%. diode rectifier. The impedance of the capacitors is high Index Terms— Power electronics, Light Emitting Diodes, enough and the tolerance is in a small range to determine the PWM dimming control, PI Control, Synchronous Integrator, current and restrict the current difference among LED strings. Variable dimming frequency However, the utilization rate of LEDs is relatively poor, and the pulsating current in LEDs may decrease the luminous efficacy [12]. Dedicated dc-dc converters are used in [13, 14] I. INTRODUCTION to reduce the power dissipation, where each converter is IGHTING Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are receiving more designed and controlled optimally to achieve desired forward and more attention because of their benefits such as current. A drawback with this method is that the configuration longevity, chromatic variety, and fast response. One of the is complex and needs many bulky magnetic components, main objectives in LED driver design is to minimize color which considerably increases the size and the construction spectrum shift and to control luminance intensity via accurate cost. In [15], a digital PI controller combined with a linear current regulation. The luminosity of the LEDs is directly current regulator is used to regulate the boost converter related to the forward current, while their I-V characteristics voltage and achieve desired current for each LED string. To are temperature dependent and may vary with aging [1, 2]. equalize the current in each LED string, [16] and [17] utilize Due to the exponential relationship between the forward linear current mirror (CM) regulator. In CM method, LED current and the forward voltage of LEDs, a small voltage strings’ currents are balanced based on one controlled current variation may cause dramatic increase of the forward current. source as a fixed current reference, which requires a separate Since the forward voltage varies in a wide range even for power supply. The voltage difference between forced LEDs from the same manufacturer [3, 4], most LED drivers operating voltage by transistor and supply voltage, results in a have been developed to control the illumination by regulating high headroom voltage and serious power dissipation. A time multiplexing control scheme along with high-frequency-time- Manuscript received Sept. 12, 2016; revised Dec. 05, 2016; accepted Jan. sharing (HFTS) PWM dimming technique is presented in [4], 06, 2017. Date of current version Jan. 18, 2017. This work was supported by where most of the effort is devoted to minimizing power loss NSF under Grant ECCS-1200152. and the volume of the driver. By using the control scheme Mohammad Tahan is a PhD student in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA in[4], the average current in each LED is a function of the 01854, USA (e-mail: Mohammad_tahan@student.uml.edu). number of LED strings (N), Tingshu Hu is with the Department of Electrical and Computer =𝑉 ⁄(𝑁× 𝑅 ) (1) Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA (e-mail: Tingshu_hu@uml.edu). Which results in a decrease of the utilization factor. In other presented first and described in details. This architecture is then words, the number of LED strings is limited by 𝑁 = extended to a driver for multiple LED strings, with detailed ⁄ explanation of the multiplexing timing diagram and variable 𝐼 𝐼 , where 𝐼 is the maximum peak current of an LED dimming frequency. device. To overcome the limitations of existing SIMO LED drivers, a coordinated low-frequency and time-sharing A. Single LED String Driver (CLFTS) technique has been proposed in [18] and [19]. By Ideally, maintaining the bus voltage (𝑉 ) at a constant using the CLFTS technique, the low-frequency dimming desired value leads to a corresponding desired LED current. switches lead to a non-pulsating output current profile during However, the LED’s I-V characteristics depends on the the dimming-ON period, while the high-frequency time- temperature and may vary with aging. Hence, it is preferred to sharing operation of the power channel switches enables a full control the LED current directly so that it follows a desired range dimming ratio for every string. With this new technique, reference value. For this purpose, the LED current is sensed LED devices of low current ratings can be utilized. It should by 𝑅 and feedback control is designed to achieve reference be noted that the LED driver developed in [18-20] is based on tracking. It was shown in [21-23] that a simple integral control a SIMO buck converter which requires the dc power supply can achieve practical global stability for general dc-dc voltage to be higher than the LED strings’ channel voltages. converters. Thus in the proposed control scheme, the The objective of this paper is to develop a SIMO LED integration of the current error is used for feedback, as shown driver based on a boost converter, to achieve flexible and wide in Fig. 1. In the control loop, the first op-amp picks up the range PWM dimming for every string. The main difference LED current and amplifies the signal in order to raise the from the LED driver in [18] and [19] is that the LED driver in signal to noise ratio. The second op-amp generates the this paper allows the power supply voltage to be in a wide tracking error of the current whose output is connected to range below the LED strings’ channel voltages, making it rd MOSFET 𝑄 . The source of 𝑄 is connected to the 3 op-amp, more applicable to portable devices powered by batteries. th which is an integrator. The 4 op-amp scales the integrator Another difference is that a low frequency time-sharing output so that its lower limit (a negative value) corresponds to among the power channel switches is implemented in this the upper limit of the duty cycle 𝐷 for the boost converter. paper, which allows full range duty ratio for the boost The input of the integrator is turned on and off by 𝑄 . When it converter’s main switch when each channel is charged. This in is turned off, the voltage across 𝐶 does not change. The two turn gives full control to the boost converter, which is essential MOSFETs 𝑄 and 𝑄 are controlled by the same output of to a wide range of power supply voltage, robust stability and PWM2, so that the LED string and the integrator are turned on good transient performances. These features of the proposed and off at the same time. As 𝑄 is turned on and off by a LED driver is enabled by a unique combination of PWM dimming signal, the LED current that flows through the synchronous integrators, variable dimming frequency and a string is theoretically an ideal rectangular waveform. For new time multiplexing scheme. driving 𝑄 , the logic AND ensures that the boost converter is This paper is organized as follows. In Section II, the turned off while the LEDs are turned off. The LED current operating principle is illustrated, along with a timing diagram depends linearly on 𝑉 around a small region. Although this for the switches. For simplicity and clarity, a driver for one LED string is utilized to explain the proposed control strategy relationship may vary with time, the change is too slow as and then extended to a driver with multiple LED strings. compared with the dimming frequency and the transience of Selection of key components for boost converter and design the boost converter. In the implementation of a single LED considerations are discussed in Section III based on transient string driver, PWM1 controls the boost converter at a higher analysis results. Variable dimming frequency is developed in frequency about 400kHz and PWM2 implements dimming Section IV to attain high performance. Experimental results across the LED string at a lower frequency, e.g., 300Hz. Therefore, by controlling PWM1 via feedback loop, the bus are presented for a three LED string driver in Section V, which validate minimal current balance error and high efficiency. Finally, Section VI summarizes the main results and the contributions of the paper. II. OPERATION PRINCIPLE OF PROPOSED LED DRIVER To achieve optimal LED performance and lifetime expectancy, it is desirable to have a driver design that yields accurate LED currents and minimal power loss. One key challenge in the traditional LED drivers with multiple LED strings is system volume. In this paper, a compact single- inductor multiple-output (SIMO) LED driver based on variable dimming frequency and synchronous integral control scheme will be proposed. For simplicity and clarity, the system Fig. 1. Single string LED driver with synchronous integrator architecture of the proposed driver with a single LED string is voltage (𝑉 ) and the LED current are automatically regulated to the desired values. B. Multiple LED String Driver In conventional methods which use linear current regulators to control LED strings’ currents, all local bus voltages of LED strings are adjusted to the same value. This may cause excessive power loss in the current regulators, when the difference between bus voltage and LED string’s voltage varies from low to high. In this work, the LED current of each string is controlled based on its own I-V characteristic, thus independent bus voltage regulation is achieved to prevent excessive power loss. The proposed multiple string LED driver circuit is shown in Fig.2. As compared to the single string driver, an additional switch 𝑄 is used in parallel with the inductor and one more switch is used for each string (𝑄 ,𝑄 and 𝑄 for the three strings respectively). A dc–dc converter normally works in discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) at light load for high efficiency, while it operates in Fig. 3. Timing diagram continuous conduction mode (CCM) at heavy load to supply more power. Although smaller inductor needs to be used for The pseudo-continuous conduction mode (PCCM) is heavy load to operate at DCM to attain higher efficiency, it proposed for SIMO converter in [24] for cross regulation causes higher peak inductor current, larger current ripple, and suppression, as well as for handling large current stress at consequently larger output voltage ripple. For a SIMO heavy loads. To implement PCCM, a freewheel switch 𝑄 is converter, CCM leads to cross regulation among channels and applied in parallel with the inductor, which shorts out the DCM imposes large current stress on the components. inductor in the DCM interval when the current reaches zero. In this working mode, the floor of the inductor current is raised by a dc level of 𝐼 . This eliminates the power constraints in the DCM case, while retaining relatively small current ripple and voltage ripple. With this method, a larger bandwidth is achieved and the transient response is improved [24]. In this work, PCCM is employed for improving transient response and mitigating the voltage stress. In what follows, the proposed timing scheme for the switches will be described in detail for the case of three parallel LED strings, as illustrated in Fig. 3. At first, assume that a uniform dimming frequency is adopted for all strings and the corresponding dimming period is 𝑇 . The dimming ratios for the three strings are denoted as 𝐷 ,𝐷 and 𝐷 , and LED string is turned on when the corresponding gate signal 𝜑 , 𝜑 or 𝜑 is high. The on-time intervals for the three LED strings are denoted as 𝐷 𝑇 ,𝐷 𝑇 and 𝐷 𝑇 respectively, which also represent the duration of the on-time intervals. The upper limit for 𝐷 ,𝐷 and 𝐷 is 1 so the on-time intervals can be overlapped, as illustrated in Fig.3. One dimming period is equally divided into three sub-intervals of length 𝑇 =𝑇 /3 and each is allocated to one channel for charging the output capacitor. The charging phases for the three channels are denoted as 𝜑 , 𝜑 and 𝜑 with duration 𝑑 𝑇 ,𝑑 𝑇 and 𝑑 𝑇 , respectively, where 𝑑 ,𝑑 and 𝑑 are the duty ratios of the charging phases. The upper limit for 𝑑 ,𝑑 and 𝑑 is 1/3. Typically 𝑑 =𝐷 /3 but can be a different value when variable dimming frequency is utilized, as will be explained in Section IV. For channel 1, the on-time interval 𝐷 𝑇 has two parts. The Fig. 2. Circuit block diagram for proposed LED driver 4 first part is 𝑑 𝑇 , during which both 𝜑 and 𝜑 are high, characteristics, therefore optimal voltage is applied across when the boost converter charges the output capacitor and each string to ensure minimal power loss. Power consumption in a LED string (𝑃 ) can be expressed in terms of LEDs supplies the LED string. In the second part, 𝜑 is low and ( ) ( ) 𝜑 is high, when the capacitor is disconnected from the boost power consumption 𝑃 , switch’s power loss 𝑃 and converter and is the only power supply for the LED string. current sensor power loss (𝑃 ) as below: During the on-time interval 𝐷 𝑇 , Q is turned on  𝑃 =𝑃 +𝑃 +𝑃  simultaneously with Q , thus the LED string and the integrator When the dimming switching frequency and LED current are turned on and off at the same time. Hence the integrator is and 𝑃 would are set to desired values, the power losses 𝑃 called a synchronous integrator. Although the channel voltage be constants. Therefore, the string’s power consumption varies is regulated only during the first part of the on-time interval, according to 𝑃 . the powerful and robust synchronous integral control is able to bring it to a steady state value which produces the desired  𝑃 =𝑉 ×𝐼 LED current under a wide range of operating conditions. The where other two channels have similar working principle. The key idea of the proposed timing scheme is the  𝑉 =𝑉 −∆𝑉 −∆𝑉  separation of the capacitor’s charge interval and the LED Since constant LED current and switching frequency lead string’s on-time interval for a channel, which is implemented to constant ∆𝑉 and ∆𝑉 , the string’s power loss is just a by isolating the switch 𝑄 from 𝑄 , and that the non- function of the bus voltage. This is very important when the overlapped charging phases along with diode 𝐷 isolate the driver works in flexible dimming mode and each string has its output capacitors to avoid short circuit among them during own dimming ratio. Due to different junction temperature and 𝑑 𝑇 ,𝑑 𝑇 and 𝑑 𝑇 . Meanwhile, the on-time intervals 𝐷 𝑇 , aging factor, the I-V characteristics of the strings would be 𝐷 𝑇 and 𝐷 𝑇 can be overlapped, allowing all LED strings to different and independent current control for each string is be turned on at the same time, so that the maximum value for necessary to mitigate extra power loss. As investigated in [4], the dimming ratios can be 1 and the LEDs’ capacity can be fixed bus voltage for all LED strings can degrade the fully utilized. Theoretically, the duty ratio 𝑑 of a charging efficiency up to 30%. interval can be one third of the dimming ratio 𝐷 . While in Second, the proposed LED driver offers independent practice, to prevent short circuit among output capacitors, current control of each string, which facilitates flexible dead time logic needs to be implemented between the on times dimming scheme to control each individual string by its own of 𝜑 , 𝜑 and 𝜑 , which slightly reduces the upper limit of dimming ratio. In applications where adaptive dimming technique drives divided units of channel [25, 26], the 𝑑 ,𝑑 and 𝑑 . Also note that snubber circuits should be used proposed time multiplexing algorithm can be adopted to to minimize voltage stress. When no channel capacitor is increase the accuracy of the image contrast ratio. In [4], a charged, the power supply, the inductor L, the diode D and the single time-shared regulation loop is implemented by utilizing MOSFET Q and Q are virtually turned off. Therefore, the a single current sensor and minimizing the current balance efficiency should be nearly the same as the case where there is error among strings. As will be seen in transient analysis to be no dimming. By the proposed timing plan, only one capacitor conducted in Section III, using separate current sensors in the can be charged at a time, but the LED strings can be turned on proposed LED driver will not affect the driver’s response, simultaneously. By the synchronous integral control method, since the feedback loop is robust to the change of integrator the forward current of the first LED string is regulated during gain in a wide range. 𝑑 𝑇 interval, and the output capacitor is discharged during the second part of 𝐷 𝑇 interval. (Similarly for the other III. TRANSIENT ANALYSIS AND DESIGN CONSIDERATION channels.) In case of low dimming frequency, i.e. 300Hz, and In this section, a continuous-time mathematical model of high dimming ratio, the output capacitor may be discharged the boost converter in PCCM operation is used to analyze the considerably by the end of the 𝐷 𝑇 interval, and the LED effect of the converter components on the steady state and current would deviate significantly from the rated value. To transient response. This mathematical model is fast and ensure satisfactory steady state performance and acceptable accurate enough to tackle many difficult design trade-offs and current ripple size, the driver parameters such as L, C and also ensures this accuracy at the limits [27]. The mathematical dimming frequency need to be carefully chosen based on model to be used in this paper is a third order model based on transient and steady state analysis of the circuit. Transient the basic differential equations of the boost converter and analysis to be carried out in section III shows that 1.8kHz control loop, taking all the parasitic series resistors into dimming frequency for three LED string driver achieves account. The time-domain solutions of the equations are used acceptable results for dimming ratio greater than 30%. to calculate the output voltage, the load current and other The proposed time multiplexing and control strategies are circuit variables under certain operating conditions. The designed such that independent current regulation of each equivalent circuit of a boost converter with freewheeling LED string can be attained within dedicated time interval switch is illustrated in Fig. 4. In this equivalent circuit, the 𝑑 𝑇 ,𝑑 𝑇 or 𝑑 𝑇 . This feature has two advantages. First, bus parasitic series resistance of inductor 𝑅 and switches’ on voltage adjustment is done based on each LED strings resistance 𝑅 are taken into account. Fig. 6. The equivalent circuit for discharging of L and charging of C Fig. 4. Circuit diagram of boost converter with parasitic series resistors 𝑑 𝑉 𝐶𝑅 𝑅 +𝐿 𝑑𝑉 𝑅 +𝑅 + + 𝑉 𝑑𝑡 𝐿𝐶𝑅 𝑑𝑡 𝐿𝐶𝑅 𝑅 𝑉 +𝑅 𝑉 = (13) 𝐿𝐶𝑅 with  𝑅 =𝑅 +𝑅  𝑉 (0) =𝑉   ( ) 𝑑𝑉 0 1 𝑉 −𝑉 = + (16)  𝑑𝑡 𝐶 𝑅 Fig. 5. Equivalent circuits: (a) charging phase of L (b) discharging phase of C and For simplicity, the total equivalent series resistance of the 𝑑 𝐼 𝐶𝑅 𝑅 +𝐿 𝑑𝐼 𝑅 +𝑅 + + 𝐼 LED string is denoted as 𝑅 , which includes 𝑅 and the 𝑑𝑡 𝐿𝐶𝑅 𝑑𝑡 𝐿𝐶𝑅 dimming switch’s on resistance. The forward voltage drop of 𝑉 −𝑉 = (17) the LED string is denoted as 𝑉 . The equivalent circuits of the 𝐿𝐶𝑅 charging phase of L, and the discharging phase of C are shown with in Fig. 5. Two first order differential equations, together with ( ) ( ) ( )  𝐼 0 =𝐼  the initial conditions for 𝐼 𝑡 and 𝑉 𝑡 , are given as below: ( ) 𝑑𝐼 0 1  𝐿 +𝑅 𝐼 =𝑉 = 𝑉 −𝑉 − 𝑅 𝐼 (19) _ _ 𝑑𝑡 𝐿 ( )  𝐶𝑅 +𝑉 =𝑉 ( ) Here 𝑉 is the value of 𝑉 𝑡 at the end of the preceding discharge phase of C, which can be expressed as with ( )  𝑖 0 =𝐼  𝑉 =𝑉 +𝑉 −𝑉 (20) _ _ ( )  𝑉 0 =𝑉  Meanwhile, 𝐼 is the value of 𝑖 (𝑡 ) at the end of the preceding charge phase of L, which is given by  𝑅 =𝑅 +𝑅 𝑉 𝑉 ( ) Where 𝑉 is the value of 𝑉 𝑡 at the end of the 𝐼 = +𝐼 − 𝑒 (21) 𝑅 𝑅 ( ) preceding charge phase of C, and 𝐼 is the value of 𝑖 𝑡 at the end of the preceding discharge phase of L [27]. In PCCM, Where 𝑡 depends on the duty cycle of the boost converter, the converter actually works in DCM in disguise, because the which is determined by the feedback control law. For the zero dc current in a DCM case is now replaced by a constant closed loop system with integral control, the duty cycle 𝐷 is 𝐼 [24]. Thus we have: approximately a linear function of the integrator voltage (𝑉 ). Based on the proposed control strategy, 𝐷 for the first string  DCM: 𝐼 =0 can be expressed in terms of the closed loop gain K and  CCM: 0<𝐼 <∞ switching time period of the boost converter (T ), when 𝑄 is turned on.  PCCM: 𝐼 =𝐼 The equivalent circuit of the phase when the inductor  𝐷 =− −𝑉 𝑑𝑡 + 𝐷  discharges and the capacitor is charged is depicted in Fig. 6. where The second order differential equations for this equivalent circuit, together with two initial conditions, are given as  𝑉 =𝑖 ×𝑅 +𝑉 follows:  𝑇 = 1⁄400000 Since the LED current is a function of the output voltage, to save space, only the output voltage is plotted to examine the effects of design parameters such as C, L, the integrator gain K and the dimming frequency on the transient responses. The figures shown below are computational results based on the mathematical model for a triple LED strings in parallel and 5 LEDs in each string with rated current of 350mA. The dimming ratio for the string is 95%, which is about the worst case, when maximum capacitor discharging time occurs. Fig.7 shows the effect of L on the transient response. It can be seen Fig. 9. Output voltage transient response for different values of K that larger inductance reduces overshoot and undershoot, but increases settling time. In case of low dimming ratio, the boost converter has smaller charging time 𝑑 𝑇 . Thus a driver with larger inductance cannot boost up the output capacitor voltage. Fig. 8 shows the transient response for several values of the output capacitor. Increasing the capacitance will decrease the voltage overshoot and steady state LED current deviation but slow down the response and increase voltage undershoot. The transient responses of output voltage for 3 values of K are illustrated in Fig. 9. By increasing the integrator gain K, the output voltage oscillation is increased but the settling time is decreased. For K greater than 5000, the closed loop system Fig. 10. Output voltage response to the change of reference current is unstable. Good transient response is attained for K within [400, 1000]. Larger K results in faster start-up and transient following the reference signal. The stability of the closed-loop response, thus higher values are preferred, especially when system is further verified with the Bode plots in Figure 11, for there are more parallel LED strings. the open loop transfer function obtained at the nominal Fig.10 depicts the response of output voltage to the change operating condition (350mA LED current, 7.8V power supply of the reference current, where the value of the reference LED voltage) , which shows an infinity gain margin and a phase current is 350mA for 𝑡∈ 0,0.4 ; 35mA for 𝑡 ∈ (0.4,0.8 and margin of 84.1 degree. Within the operating range of 35mA to 350mA for 𝑡 0.8𝑠 . The voltage response in the figure 350mA LED current and 5.2V to 8.8V power supply voltage, demonstrates robust stability and desired transient response in the least phase margin of 68.6 degree is obtained under the operating condition of 35mA LED current and 8.8V power supply voltage, under which the duty ratio for the booster converter main switch is minimal (2.8%). The dimming frequency has a large effect on the steady Fig. 7. Transient response of output voltage for different inductance Fig. 8. Output voltage transient response for different capacitance Fig. 11. Bode Diagram under nominal operating condition 7 IV. VARIABLE DIMMING FREQUENCY FOR ENHANCED PERFORMANCE The mathematical simulation for low dimming ratios shows that, the response time of the boost converter is not fast enough to reach the steady state at high dimming frequency. This imperfection leads to undesirable waveform with considerable undershoot for dimming ratio less than 30%, and makes the LED driver unstable for dimming ratios 15% and lower. Fig. 13 depicts transient responses of output voltage at different dimming ratios when 1.8kHz dimming frequency is implemented. While 90% and 60% dimming ratios yield Fig. 12. Transient response of LED current for 1.8kHz dimming frequency and 90% dimming ratio acceptable responses, lower dimming ratios give slower rise up voltage. The settling time at 25% dimming ratio is 2.62sec, state deviation of LED current. Lower dimming frequency which causes significant LED current undershoots. At 12% leads to longer discharging time. Hence, the output capacitor dimming ratio, the voltage response gets worse and cannot will be more discharged and the LED current will decrease reach the required steady state value. more significantly. On the other hand, higher dimming To deal with these issues, a variable dimming frequency frequency decreases circuit efficiency, and at low dimming strategy is devised in the proposed LED driver to achieve ratio, the output capacitor voltage cannot reach the required satisfactory transient response and nearly square current steady state. Therefore, based on the mathematical transient waveform at steady state for all dimming ratios. With this analysis, a compromise among response time, overt shoot, strategy, the dimming frequency for one string is decreased in undershoot and current deviation must be taken. With regard 2 steps as a function of the dimming ratio. The function is to the circuit configuration and the parameters of the LED defined as below: strings, 1/𝑇 =1.8kHz is picked as the dimming frequency, which yields satisfactory transient and steady state response 𝐹, 𝐷 ≥ 0.3 for dimming ratio greater than 30%.  𝐹 = 𝐹 2, 0.15 ≤ 𝐷 < 0.3  Fig. 12 shows the transient response of LED current in one 𝐹3 ⁄, 𝐷 < 0.15 period at 1.8kHz dimming frequency. Exponential decaying Where 𝐹 is the dimming frequency for a LED string, D is current response is expected during the discharging phase. the dimming ratio and F is the main dimming frequency, With a high dimming frequency, the discharge interval is short which is selected as 1.8kHz based on the transient analysis for and the decrease of the current appears to be a straight line. this particular application. To avoid short circuit among LED The last consideration in the proposed method is the number strings, the main-dimming frequency (1.8kHz) must be of parallel strings. Similar issues with regard to scalability has divisible by an individual string’s dimming frequency. The been discussed in [21] for a SIMO buck LED driver. In case of highest frequency that fulfills the aforementioned condition N parallel LED strings, the driver should reach the reference and yields desired LED current waveform can be picked as the current in 1𝑁 ⁄ dimming period T during the capacitor’s next sub-dimming frequency. This strategy helps to prevent charging interval and keep the LED current deviation in an considerable undershoot and reduces the minimum achievable acceptable range during the discharging interval of the contrast ratio. On the other hand, higher frequency is still ( )⁄ capacitor, which is 𝑁− 1 𝑁 of T . For a constant boost adopted for higher dimming ratio to avoid considerable converter frequency, transient analysis need to be conducted to capacitor discharge and maintain the LED current deviation in investigate the trade-off among the circuit parameters such as an acceptable range. dimming frequency, integrator gain, inductor and capacitor To demonstrate the modified switching signals under the values, and 𝐼 of PCCM operation. Analysis reveals that variable dimming frequency scheme, the timing diagram for decreasing the frequency of the boost converter and increasing the three strings with different dimming ratios is presented in 𝐼 can improve the transient response at low dimming ratio, Fig. 14, where the dimming ratios are 90%, 25% and 10% for since low frequency allows the capacitor longer time to charge the first, the second and the third string, respectively. The and the boost converter works like a single output converter proposed switching strategy is simpler than the counterpart in during the charge interval. Another alternative approach is to [28, 29] but more efficient. The corresponding dimming adopt supercapacitors which are compatible with the nature of frequency for each LED string is determined as below: the proposed switching scheme. Supercapacitors can act as  F =2F = 3F =1/T =1.8KHZ D1 D2 D3 D1 output capacitor of boost converter with high frequency switching. On the other hand, it can work as battery in  F =1/T =900HZ D2 D2 discharging intervals of LED configuration with higher  F =1/T =600HZ D3 D3 number of parallel strings or series LEDs to maintain the LED current within desired range. where  T =3T D1 8 Fig. 13. Output voltage transient response for different dimming ratios Fig. 15. Output voltage transient responses to 12% dimming ratio dimming ratio equal or less than 15%, the LED string works with 3T = 9T dimming period. In this scenario, the D1 maximum charging interval of 𝑇 is still attainable for all range of dimming ratios equal or less than 15%. For instance, the charging interval for 14% dimming ratio would be 𝑇 , the on-time interval would be 0.14 × 9𝑇 = 1.26𝑇 , and the discharge interval when the LED string is solely fed by the capacitor is 0.26T. On the other hand, for dimming ratios less than 11%, the charging interval could be selected the same as the on-time interval, since the maximum attainable charging interval is greater than the required dimming time. Again, this ensures that the charging interval of the third LED string (𝜑 ) is terminated before the first LED string’s charging starts (𝜑 ), without any short circuit. Fig. 15 shows the effect of reducing dimming frequency on the output voltage’s transient response at 12% dimming ratio. A 900Hz dimming frequency improves the transient response, but the settling time of 0.6061Sec for 12% dimming ratio is not satisfactory. Further decreasing the dimming frequency to 600Hz yields better transient response and consequently acceptable LED current undershoots. The modified switching scheme allows the LED driver to use different dimming frequencies for each string Fig. 14. Modified timing diagram under variable dimming frequency scheme without switching signal interference, while maintaining the flexible dimming scheme and yields desired waveforms.  T =2T =6T D2 D1 Higher efficiency is another byproduct of applying the  T =3T =9T D3 D1 variable dimming frequency scheme. First it reduces the Since the dimming period of the second LED string is switching loss by applying lower dimming frequency; Second, selected as 2T = 6T, the charging and discharging phases D1 utilizing maximum attainable charge interval further improves may take T and 5T long, respectively. The dimming frequency efficiency at lower dimming ratio. It is noted that the corresponding to this dimming period is 900Hz, which is used efficiency increases as the dimming ratio is increased. Since when the dimming ratio is between 15% and 30%. This timing the average LED current, which contributes to the copper loss, scheme has the advantage of using the maximum length of a becomes comparable with high peak current of the inductor, charging interval, without short circuit among the channels, which yields constant power loss in all range of dimming ratio which is about 𝑇 for all range of dimming ratios between 15% when dimming frequency is constant. and 30%. For instance, if the dimming ratio for the second string is 20%, the charging interval would be 𝑇 , the on-time V. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS interval would be 0.2 × 6𝑇 = 1.2𝑇 , and the discharge interval In order to verify the proposed method, a boost converter when the LED string is solely fed by the capacitor is 0.2T. with a controller based on TMS320F28335 is used to drive Note that for low dimming ratios, it is preferred to use three LED strings, where each string consists of 5 LEDs in maximum charging duty ratio, so that the boost converter has series. The LED’s rated current is 350mA. more time to reach the steady state and to yield desired LED Fig. 16 shows the implemented control block diagram by current shape. This timing scheme ensures that the charging DSP. The outputs A , A and A of the analogue to digital 0 1 2 interval of the second LED string (𝜑 ) is ended before the converter block in Fig. 16 are the measurements of the three third LED string’s charging signal is fired (𝜑 ). In case of LED strings’ currents. The first string’s control loop block in 9 Fig. 16. Experimental control block diagram Fig. 17. Expanded block diagram of first string control loop Fig. 16 is expanded in Fig. 17, where the measured current is compared with the reference value (0.35A) and the error is digitally integrated to generate a duty cycle for the boost converter. The control loop also generates the dimming frequency based on the dimming ratio and switching signals for charging the capacitors and dimming the LEDs. The dimming frequency block in Fig. 17, is a periodic counter based on the frequency of CPU and determines the dimming frequency. The dimming ratio is used to determine the charging duty cycle and dimming duty cycle. The charging duty cycle blocks and the dimming duty cycle blocks for the three strings generate three non-overlapped charging signals, 𝜑 , , and overlapped dimming signals 𝜑 , , respectively. The control loop blocks for other strings are similar to that of the first string, except for that the dimming frequency, charging duty cycle and dimming duty cycle blocks Fig. 18. Photograph of a prototype board are determined separately based on the dimming ratio of an A photo of the prototype board is presented in Fig. 18, individual string. The dimming PWM block creates required where the rulers beside it shows the size of 1.88in by 1.69in. dimming switching signals for Q and Q . The sum of Out1 2 3 For easy reference, numbers are assigned in Fig. 18 beside the from the three control loop blocks is used to generate the components : #1 -- inductor; #2-4 -- output capacitors; #5-8 - intended switching signal for Q for the boost converter via - 8 MOSFETs; #9-11 – diodes; #12-14 -- current sense the boost converter PWM block in Fig. 16, which is resistors; #15, 16-- quad MOSFET drivers; #17--quad Op- implemented to the MOSFET Q via a high frequency Amp; #18--power supply, ground and control voltage MOSFET driver. To ensure safe switching and to prevent connectors; #19--connector for switching signals of Q , Q , 1 2 short circuit among LED strings, dead time is applied to non- Q and Q ; #20 -- connector for LED strings, analogue output 5 8 overlapped switching signals and is set to 16s. Therefore, the signals and switching signals of Q , Q and Q ; #21-- 3 6 9 duty ratio of charging interval should be kept unchanged for connector for switching signal of Q . dimming ratios more than 97%. 10 TABLE I CIRCUIT PARAMETERS Symbol Description Value F boost converter freq. 400kHz F main dimming freq. 1.8kHz V dc input voltage 7.8V in L inductance 7.4 µH th C n output capacitance 2000 µF On th R n current sense 0.1 Ω Sn resistor th D n rectifying diode PMEG10020ELR th Q n MOSFET FDC6401N - MOSFET driver TC4468 - Op-Amp LTI1359 Fig. 20. LED current start-up response for (a) 4% dimming ratio (b) 95% dimming ratio due to higher temperature caused by larger average LED current which reduces the forward voltage or the equivalent series resistance [31]. The difference between the final values of capacitor voltages verifies that individual bus voltage adjustment is attained based on the proposed current regulation control scheme which leads to minimal power loss of the LED strings. The start-up responses of LED currents for channel 1 (4% dimming ratio) and channel 2 (95% dimming ratio) are depicted in Fig. 20. The first LED string with 4% dimming ratio takes 0.168Sec to reach the final value of 350mA, while the second LED string with 95% dimming ratio Fig. 19. Output voltage start-up responses (a) 4% dimming ratio (b) 95% takes 0.047Sec. It comes to the conclusion that decreasing the dimming ratio dimming frequency to one third would still result in acceptable transient response of the LED current. Fig. 21 shows the The key parameters of the prototype circuit are provided in steady state periodic waveforms of LED string currents with Table 1. The steady state waveforms are captured by a 4- 95% uniform dimming ratio for all channels. Note that the channel oscilloscope and the transient responses are recorded LED currents shown in the oscilloscopes are scaled up by 10. by a 24 bit DAQ card (NI 9239), and then plotted by MATLAB. Figs. 19 and 20 show the start-up responses from experiment, where 4% and 95% dimming ratios are applied to the first and the second string, respectively. Fig. 19(a) shows the start-up response of capacitor voltage for the first string with dimming ratio 4%. The voltage rises up smoothly at a rate about 0.032(𝑉 𝑚𝑆 ⁄ ) with settling time of 95.83 𝑚𝑆 , and reaches 11.41V at steady state. The second string’s capacitor voltage is plotted in Fig 19.(b), with a 95% dimming ratio. It rises up faster at a rate about 0.209(𝑉 𝑚𝑆 ) and a settling time of 10.93 𝑚𝑆 . Although the capacitor’s voltage reaches about 10.62V at steady state, it continues to decrease due to the current regulation function of the LED driver, in reaction to the increasing junction temperature and the temperature dependent I-V curve of the LED string. Similar voltage response has been observed in [30]. For the channel with higher dimming ratio, the output steady state voltage is lower Fig. 21. Steady state results for 95% dimming ratio 11 TABLE II CURRENT IMBALANCE AND DEVIATION FOR 95% UNIFORM DIMMING Avg. Current Current Description Current(mA) imbalance(%) deviation(%) String 1 344 0.09 -1.71 String 2 344 0.09 -1.71 String 3 343 -0.19 -2.00 It can be seen that the on time interval of one string has two parts. The first part is the charging interval, which is marked by larger peak to peak value (thicker line), when the output capacitor is charged by the boost converter. The second part is the discharging interval, which is marked by smaller peak to peak value (thinner line), when the LED string is solely fed by the capacitor. The LED currents slightly increase during charging intervals, which results from the charging current of the boost converter and is an effect of the current regulation of Fig. 23. Steady state results for 4% dimming ratio the integral control. While in a discharging interval, since the LED string is solely fed by the capacitor, the capacitor voltage should decrease. However, this decrease is almost invisible in the oscilloscope waveforms owing to the proper choice of switching frequency and boost converter parameters. To measure the current imbalance among the three strings, denote ∑( ) the average of on-time currents as 𝐼 = 1/3 𝐼 ,where 𝐼 is the average on-time current of the nth LED string. Then the current imbalance for each string can be expressed as:  Current imbalance = 𝐼 −𝐼 𝐼  Table 2 shows the measured average on-time string currents, current imbalance and current deviation from the reference value at 95% uniform dimming ratio. Negligible current imbalance makes the proposed LED driver a perfect match for applications where uniform brightness is required. Figs. 22 and 23 show the steady state current waveforms at Fig. 24. Steady state results for 90%, 23% and 4% dimming ratio 20% and 4% uniform dimming ratio, where the switching frequency is reduced to 900Hz and 600Hz, respectively, by the Fig. 24 demonstrates the flexible dimming capability of the variable dimming frequency scheme. These figures validate proposed LED driver, where the first string works at 90% the desirable performance of the LED driver with the proposed dimming ratio (bottom curve), the second string at 23% control scheme, and that nearly square current waveforms are (middle) and the third string at 4% (top). Table 3 presents the generated within a wide range of dimming ratio. measured average string currents, current imbalance and current deviation from reference value for the three strings with 90%, 23% and 4% dimming ratios. Fig. 25 is generated to show both the LED current and the bus voltage for the first and the third strings. In this figure, CH1 and CH2 of the oscilloscope (two curves at bottom) represent the LED current and bus voltage of the third string with 4% dimming ratio, and CH3 and CH4 (two curves on top) represent the LED current and bus voltage for the first string at 90% dimming ratio. The bus voltages are adjusted to 11.36V and 10.48V for the third and the first string, respectively. Each bus voltage should increase during the capacitor’s charge interval and decrease during its discharge interval. Owing to the proper choice of LED driver parameters and control scheme, there is only slight increase of bus voltage during the charge interval and the decrease during discharge interval is almost invisible. It is also observed that there is visible ripple and noise in the bus voltage during the charge Fig. 22. Steady state results for 20% dimming ratio Fig. 27. Close-up view of steady state waveform at 50% dimming ratio Fig. 25. Steady state results for 90% and 4% dimming ratio TABLE III CURRENT IMBALANCE AND DEVIATION FOR VARIABLE DIMMING SCHEME Avg. Current Current Description Current(mA) imbalance(%) deviation(%) String 1 346 -0.86 -1.14 String 2 350 0.29 0 String 3 351 0.57 0.28 interval, which is caused by high frequency switching of the boost converter. The maximal peak to peak ripple for the bus voltage is less than 0.84V. Fig. 28. LED driver efficiency Fig. 26 depicts the periodic inductor current waveform (middle curve) at steady state, together with the first LED 900Hz, the same as that of the string with the lowest dimming string’s current and bus voltage (bottom and top curves), when ratio. the three LED strings work at different dimming ratios, 50%, Fig. 27 is a close-up view of Fig. 26, which shows the 95% and 23%, respectively. By the variable dimming waveforms in a few switching periods of the boost converter frequency scheme, the dimming frequency for the string with when one channel’s capacitor is charged. The inductor current 23% dimming ratio is 900Hz while the other two strings’ waveform (the middle curve) indicates that the boost converter dimming frequencies are 1.8kHz. The inductor current operates at PCCM. Note that the inductor current decreases waveform in Fig. 26 shows two charging intervals for the first when freewheel switching is activated, since the current loop string (50% dimming), two charging intervals for the second is not lossless. The parasitic series resistance of L, the on- string (95% dimming), and one charging interval for the third resistance of Q , wiring, and bonding are some factors leading string (23% dimming). The inductor current’s frequency is to the drop of the inductor current [24]. Fig. 26 shows that flat capacitor voltage during discharging interval of capacitors is attained to recover the LEDs current instantly after the boost converter is turned on for the next dimming cycle. On the other hand, in Fig. 27, PCCM keeps the inductor current nearly constant during off time interval of the boost converter to improve the transient response. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed LED driver, the RMS values of LED currents, voltages across the LED strings, power supply current and voltage are measured. The LED driver’s efficiency can be computed as (33), ∑ 𝑉 𝐼 𝐸𝑓𝑓𝑖𝑐𝑖𝑦𝑒𝑛𝑐 = (33) 𝑉 𝐼 Where V is the RMS voltage across the nth LED string, I n n is the RMS current of the nth LED string, V is the power in supply voltage and I is the power supply current. Fig. 28 in plots the efficiency versus the dimming ratio, when the same Fig. 26. Steady state results for 50% dimming ratio 13 [10] Y. Hu and M. M. Jovanovic, “A novel LED driver with adaptive drive dimming ratio is applied to all LED strings. The maximal voltage,” in Proc. IEEE Appl. Power Electron. Conf., pp. 565–571, efficiency occurred at about 80% dimming ratio. On account of the variable dimming frequency strategy, the efficiency has [11] S.-S. Hong, S.-H. Lee, S.-H. Cho, C.-W. Roh, and S.-K. Han, “A new cost effective current-balancing multi-channel LED driver for a large been improved about 3% at 20% dimming ratio as compared screen LCD backlight units,” J. Power Electron., vol.10, no.4, pp. 351– to the constant dimming frequency scheme. 356, Jul. 2010. [12] S. M. Baddela and D. S. Zinger, “Parallel connected LEDs operated at VI. CONCLUSION high frequency to improve current sharing,” in Proc. IEEE Ind. Appl. Soc., pp. 1677–1681, 2004. A novel multiple string LED driver is proposed in this paper [13] M. Tahan, D. Bamgboje and T. Hu, “Hybrid control system in an efficient LED driver“,2018 Annual American Control Conference by combining synchronous integral control and variable (ACC), Milwaukee, WI, 2018. dimming frequency scheme. The driver is highly efficient, has [14] S. M. Baddela and D. S. Zinger, “Parallel connected LEDs operated at high performance and a compact configuration due to the high frequency to improve current sharing,” in Proc. IEEE 39th Ind. utilization of a single inductor multiple output boost converter. Appl. Soc. Annu. Meet. Conf., vol. 3, pp. 1677–1681, Oct. 2004. [15] M. Doshi, and R. Zane, “Control of solid-state lamps using a multiphase Independent bus voltage adjustment, which is attained by a pulse width modulation technique.” IEEE Trans. Power Electronics, vol. novel time multiplexing algorithm and synchronous 25, no. 7, pp. 1894-1904, 2010. integrators, minimizes the power loss and improves the [16] H.-J. Chiu and S.-J. Cheng, “LED backlight driving system for large- scale LCD panels,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 54, no. 5, pp. 2751– efficiency and current balance accuracy. Moreover, the 2760, Oct. 2007. proposed variable dimming frequency scheme allows each [17] C. Chang, “Integrated LED driving device with current sharing for string to have independent control of dimming ratio in a wide multiple LED strings,” U.S. Patent 6 621 235, Sep. 16, 2003. [18] S. Li, Y. Guo, A. Lee, S. Tan and S. Y. Hui, “Precise and Full-Range range, which reduces the minimum achievable contrast ratio to Dimming Control for an Off-Line Single-Inductor-Multiple-Output LED 4%. The PCCM operation is adopted in the boost converter to Driver,” in Proc. IEEE ECCE2016, Milwaukee, WI, Sept. 2016. yield fast transient response and very small deviation of output [19] S. Li, Y. Guo, A. Lee, S. Tan and S. Y. Hui, “An Off-Line Single- Inductor Multiple-Outputs LED Driver with High Dimming Precision voltages and LED currents. Detailed analysis is conducted on and Full Dimming Range,” IEEE Trans. Power Electronics, vol. PP transient performance by using mathematical models. The Issue 99, pp. 1-1, 2017. desirable steady state and transient response performances are [20] M. Tahan, H. Monsef and S. Farhangi, “A new converter fault verified with a prototype driver circuit for three LED strings, discrimination method for a 12-pulse high-voltage direct current system based on wavelet transform and hidden markov models,” Simulation, which achieves a current balance error below 1% via the vol. 88, no. 6, pp. 668-679, 2012. proposed flexible dimming scheme and a dimming range [21] H. Wang, M. Tahan, and T. Hu, “Effects of rest time on equivalent between 4% to 100%. circuit model for a li-ion battery,” 2016 Annual American Control Conference (ACC), pp. 3101–3106, Boston, MA. [22] T. Hu, “A nonlinear system approach to analysis and design of power electronic converter with saturation and bilinear terms,” IEEE Trans. Power Electronics, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 399-410, Feb. 2011. [23] Y. Yao, F. Fassinou, T. Hu, “Stability and robust regulation of battery REFERENCES driven boost converter with simple feedback,” IEEE Trans. Power [1] H. -J. Chiu, Y.-K. Lo, J.-T. Chen, S.-J. Cheng, C.-Y. Lin, and S.-C. Electronics, vol.26, no. 9, pp. 2614-2626, Sep. 2011. Mou, “A high-efficiency dimmable LED driver for low-power lighting [24] D. Ma, W.-H. Ki, and C.-Y. Tsui, “A Pseudo-CCM/DCM SIMO application.” IEEE trans. Industrial Electronics, vol. 57, no. 2, pp 735- Switching Converter With Freewheel Switching,” IEEE Journal of 743, 2010. Solid-State Circuits, vol. 38, no. 6, June 2003. [2] S. Choi, T. Kim, “Symmetric current balancing circuit for LED [25] M.Tahan, H.Monsef, “HVDC Converter Fault Discrimination using backlight with dimming.” IEEE Trans. Industrial Electronics, vol. 59, Probabilistic RBF Neural Network Based on Wavelet Transform”, 4th no. 4, pp 1698-1707, 2012. power systems protections and control conference (PSPC), Tehran, Iran, [3] B. Vahidi, S. Jazebi, H.R. Baghaee, M.Tahan,M. R. Asadi, M. R., “Power System Stabilization Improvement by Using PSO-based UPFC”, [26] W.-S. Oh, D. Cho, K.-M. Cho, G.-W. Moon, B. Yang, and T. Jang, “A Joint International Conference on Power System Technology and IEEE novel two-dimensional adaptive dimming technique of X-Y channel Power India Conference, New Delhi, 2008, pp. 1-7. drivers for LED backlight system in LCD TVs,” IEEE J. Display [4] H. Chen, Y. Zhang, and D. Ma, “A SIMO parallel-string driver IC for Technol., vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 20–26, Jan. 2009. dimmable LED backlighting with local bus voltage optimization and [27] M. Wens, and M. Steyaert. 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SLVA325, Flexible and Wide Range PWM Dimming Capability,” IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition (APEC), Tampa, FL, [7] J. Zhang, L.Xu, X. Wu, and Z. Qian, “A precise passive current balancing method for multi-output LED drivers,” IEEE Trans. Power [30] L. Lohaus, A. Rossius, S. Dietrich, R. Wunderlich, and Stefan Heinen, Electron., vol. 26, no. 8, pp. 2149–2159, Aug. 2011. . “A Dimmable LED Driver With Resistive DAC Feedback Control for [8] M. Tahan and T. Hu, “Speed-sensorless vector control of surface Adaptive Voltage Regulation,” IEEE Trans. Industry Applications, vol. mounted PMS motor based on modified interacting multiple-model 51, no. 4, pp. 3254-3262, July 2015. EKF,” 2015 IEEE International Electric Machines & Drives Conference [31] D.S. Meyaard, J. Cho, E. Fred Schubert, S.H. Han, M.H. Kim, and C. (IEMDC), Coeur d'Alene, ID, 2015, pp. 510-515. Sone, “Analysis of the temperature dependence of the forward voltage [9] J. Zhang, J. Wang, and X. Wu, “A capacitor-isolated LED driver with characteristics of GaInN light-emitting diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, inherent current balance capability,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 59, 121103 (2013). no. 4, pp. 1708–1716, Apr. 2012. Mohammad Tahan (S’15) received the B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering in 2006 and his M.Sc. degree in Power electronics from University of Tehran in 2009. Currently he is PhD student at UMass Lowell. His research interests include application of Artificial Intelligence in power electronics, high performance dc/dc converter design, LED driving systems, control applications and battery modeling. Tingshu Hu (SM’01) received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China, in 1985 and 1988, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, in 2001. She was a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Santa Barbara. In January 2005, she joined the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, where she is currently a Professor. Her research interests include nonlinear systems theory, optimization, robust control theory, battery modeling and evaluation, and control applications in power electronics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Electrical Engineering and Systems Science arXiv (Cornell University)

Multiple string LED driver with flexible and high performance PWM dimming control

Electrical Engineering and Systems Science , Volume 2020 (2002) – Jan 31, 2020

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0885-8993
DOI
10.1109/TPEL.2017.2655884
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Abstract

Multiple String LED Driver with Flexible and High Performance PWM Dimming Control M. Tahan, Student Member, IEEE, T. Hu, Senior, IEEE  the forward current to a desired value. In a configuration with Abstract— The main objectives in driving multiple LED parallel strings, current balance mechanism is usually utilized strings include achieving uniform current control and high to achieve uniform brightness. performance PWM dimming for all strings. This work proposes a In view of these concerns, advanced control strategies have new multiple string LED driver to achieve not only current been developed, along with complex driver configurations. In balance, but also flexible and wide range PWM dimming ratio conventional balancing method a resistor is placed in series for each string. A compact single-inductor multiple-output with each string to minimize the current difference [5, 6]. topology is adopted in the driver, accompanied by synchronous integrators and variable dimming frequency, to achieve both However, the series current sense resistor may cause high efficiency and high performance dimming. By using the significant power loss and poor efficiency. To reduce such a proposed variable dimming frequency scheme, high dimming power loss, reactive balancing method is proposed in [7-9], frequency is applied to a string with high dimming ratio, which and [10]. Resonant capacitors in series with the common- helps to maintain the deviation of LED string current in an mode choke and a two output rectifier structure is proposed in acceptable range, while low dimming frequency is applied to a string with low dimming ratio, which helps to achieve [9], where the currents of the two outputs can be automatically rectangular LED current waveform. Meanwhile, the new time balanced due to the charge balancing of the resonant multiplexing control scheme automatically optimizes the LED capacitors. In order to extend this configuration to 2n outputs, strings’ bus voltages, thus minimizes each string’s power loss. A n separated transformers with all primary side windings three string LED driver prototype is constructed to validate the connected in series are needed [11]. In [10], a lossless reactive effectiveness of the proposed control scheme, where the three component drives the LEDs by an AC source coupled with a strings can have different dimming ratios between 4% and 100%. diode rectifier. The impedance of the capacitors is high Index Terms— Power electronics, Light Emitting Diodes, enough and the tolerance is in a small range to determine the PWM dimming control, PI Control, Synchronous Integrator, current and restrict the current difference among LED strings. Variable dimming frequency However, the utilization rate of LEDs is relatively poor, and the pulsating current in LEDs may decrease the luminous efficacy [12]. Dedicated dc-dc converters are used in [13, 14] I. INTRODUCTION to reduce the power dissipation, where each converter is IGHTING Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are receiving more designed and controlled optimally to achieve desired forward and more attention because of their benefits such as current. A drawback with this method is that the configuration longevity, chromatic variety, and fast response. One of the is complex and needs many bulky magnetic components, main objectives in LED driver design is to minimize color which considerably increases the size and the construction spectrum shift and to control luminance intensity via accurate cost. In [15], a digital PI controller combined with a linear current regulation. The luminosity of the LEDs is directly current regulator is used to regulate the boost converter related to the forward current, while their I-V characteristics voltage and achieve desired current for each LED string. To are temperature dependent and may vary with aging [1, 2]. equalize the current in each LED string, [16] and [17] utilize Due to the exponential relationship between the forward linear current mirror (CM) regulator. In CM method, LED current and the forward voltage of LEDs, a small voltage strings’ currents are balanced based on one controlled current variation may cause dramatic increase of the forward current. source as a fixed current reference, which requires a separate Since the forward voltage varies in a wide range even for power supply. The voltage difference between forced LEDs from the same manufacturer [3, 4], most LED drivers operating voltage by transistor and supply voltage, results in a have been developed to control the illumination by regulating high headroom voltage and serious power dissipation. A time multiplexing control scheme along with high-frequency-time- Manuscript received Sept. 12, 2016; revised Dec. 05, 2016; accepted Jan. sharing (HFTS) PWM dimming technique is presented in [4], 06, 2017. Date of current version Jan. 18, 2017. This work was supported by where most of the effort is devoted to minimizing power loss NSF under Grant ECCS-1200152. and the volume of the driver. By using the control scheme Mohammad Tahan is a PhD student in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA in[4], the average current in each LED is a function of the 01854, USA (e-mail: Mohammad_tahan@student.uml.edu). number of LED strings (N), Tingshu Hu is with the Department of Electrical and Computer =𝑉 ⁄(𝑁× 𝑅 ) (1) Engineering, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854, USA (e-mail: Tingshu_hu@uml.edu). Which results in a decrease of the utilization factor. In other presented first and described in details. This architecture is then words, the number of LED strings is limited by 𝑁 = extended to a driver for multiple LED strings, with detailed ⁄ explanation of the multiplexing timing diagram and variable 𝐼 𝐼 , where 𝐼 is the maximum peak current of an LED dimming frequency. device. To overcome the limitations of existing SIMO LED drivers, a coordinated low-frequency and time-sharing A. Single LED String Driver (CLFTS) technique has been proposed in [18] and [19]. By Ideally, maintaining the bus voltage (𝑉 ) at a constant using the CLFTS technique, the low-frequency dimming desired value leads to a corresponding desired LED current. switches lead to a non-pulsating output current profile during However, the LED’s I-V characteristics depends on the the dimming-ON period, while the high-frequency time- temperature and may vary with aging. Hence, it is preferred to sharing operation of the power channel switches enables a full control the LED current directly so that it follows a desired range dimming ratio for every string. With this new technique, reference value. For this purpose, the LED current is sensed LED devices of low current ratings can be utilized. It should by 𝑅 and feedback control is designed to achieve reference be noted that the LED driver developed in [18-20] is based on tracking. It was shown in [21-23] that a simple integral control a SIMO buck converter which requires the dc power supply can achieve practical global stability for general dc-dc voltage to be higher than the LED strings’ channel voltages. converters. Thus in the proposed control scheme, the The objective of this paper is to develop a SIMO LED integration of the current error is used for feedback, as shown driver based on a boost converter, to achieve flexible and wide in Fig. 1. In the control loop, the first op-amp picks up the range PWM dimming for every string. The main difference LED current and amplifies the signal in order to raise the from the LED driver in [18] and [19] is that the LED driver in signal to noise ratio. The second op-amp generates the this paper allows the power supply voltage to be in a wide tracking error of the current whose output is connected to range below the LED strings’ channel voltages, making it rd MOSFET 𝑄 . The source of 𝑄 is connected to the 3 op-amp, more applicable to portable devices powered by batteries. th which is an integrator. The 4 op-amp scales the integrator Another difference is that a low frequency time-sharing output so that its lower limit (a negative value) corresponds to among the power channel switches is implemented in this the upper limit of the duty cycle 𝐷 for the boost converter. paper, which allows full range duty ratio for the boost The input of the integrator is turned on and off by 𝑄 . When it converter’s main switch when each channel is charged. This in is turned off, the voltage across 𝐶 does not change. The two turn gives full control to the boost converter, which is essential MOSFETs 𝑄 and 𝑄 are controlled by the same output of to a wide range of power supply voltage, robust stability and PWM2, so that the LED string and the integrator are turned on good transient performances. These features of the proposed and off at the same time. As 𝑄 is turned on and off by a LED driver is enabled by a unique combination of PWM dimming signal, the LED current that flows through the synchronous integrators, variable dimming frequency and a string is theoretically an ideal rectangular waveform. For new time multiplexing scheme. driving 𝑄 , the logic AND ensures that the boost converter is This paper is organized as follows. In Section II, the turned off while the LEDs are turned off. The LED current operating principle is illustrated, along with a timing diagram depends linearly on 𝑉 around a small region. Although this for the switches. For simplicity and clarity, a driver for one LED string is utilized to explain the proposed control strategy relationship may vary with time, the change is too slow as and then extended to a driver with multiple LED strings. compared with the dimming frequency and the transience of Selection of key components for boost converter and design the boost converter. In the implementation of a single LED considerations are discussed in Section III based on transient string driver, PWM1 controls the boost converter at a higher analysis results. Variable dimming frequency is developed in frequency about 400kHz and PWM2 implements dimming Section IV to attain high performance. Experimental results across the LED string at a lower frequency, e.g., 300Hz. Therefore, by controlling PWM1 via feedback loop, the bus are presented for a three LED string driver in Section V, which validate minimal current balance error and high efficiency. Finally, Section VI summarizes the main results and the contributions of the paper. II. OPERATION PRINCIPLE OF PROPOSED LED DRIVER To achieve optimal LED performance and lifetime expectancy, it is desirable to have a driver design that yields accurate LED currents and minimal power loss. One key challenge in the traditional LED drivers with multiple LED strings is system volume. In this paper, a compact single- inductor multiple-output (SIMO) LED driver based on variable dimming frequency and synchronous integral control scheme will be proposed. For simplicity and clarity, the system Fig. 1. Single string LED driver with synchronous integrator architecture of the proposed driver with a single LED string is voltage (𝑉 ) and the LED current are automatically regulated to the desired values. B. Multiple LED String Driver In conventional methods which use linear current regulators to control LED strings’ currents, all local bus voltages of LED strings are adjusted to the same value. This may cause excessive power loss in the current regulators, when the difference between bus voltage and LED string’s voltage varies from low to high. In this work, the LED current of each string is controlled based on its own I-V characteristic, thus independent bus voltage regulation is achieved to prevent excessive power loss. The proposed multiple string LED driver circuit is shown in Fig.2. As compared to the single string driver, an additional switch 𝑄 is used in parallel with the inductor and one more switch is used for each string (𝑄 ,𝑄 and 𝑄 for the three strings respectively). A dc–dc converter normally works in discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) at light load for high efficiency, while it operates in Fig. 3. Timing diagram continuous conduction mode (CCM) at heavy load to supply more power. Although smaller inductor needs to be used for The pseudo-continuous conduction mode (PCCM) is heavy load to operate at DCM to attain higher efficiency, it proposed for SIMO converter in [24] for cross regulation causes higher peak inductor current, larger current ripple, and suppression, as well as for handling large current stress at consequently larger output voltage ripple. For a SIMO heavy loads. To implement PCCM, a freewheel switch 𝑄 is converter, CCM leads to cross regulation among channels and applied in parallel with the inductor, which shorts out the DCM imposes large current stress on the components. inductor in the DCM interval when the current reaches zero. In this working mode, the floor of the inductor current is raised by a dc level of 𝐼 . This eliminates the power constraints in the DCM case, while retaining relatively small current ripple and voltage ripple. With this method, a larger bandwidth is achieved and the transient response is improved [24]. In this work, PCCM is employed for improving transient response and mitigating the voltage stress. In what follows, the proposed timing scheme for the switches will be described in detail for the case of three parallel LED strings, as illustrated in Fig. 3. At first, assume that a uniform dimming frequency is adopted for all strings and the corresponding dimming period is 𝑇 . The dimming ratios for the three strings are denoted as 𝐷 ,𝐷 and 𝐷 , and LED string is turned on when the corresponding gate signal 𝜑 , 𝜑 or 𝜑 is high. The on-time intervals for the three LED strings are denoted as 𝐷 𝑇 ,𝐷 𝑇 and 𝐷 𝑇 respectively, which also represent the duration of the on-time intervals. The upper limit for 𝐷 ,𝐷 and 𝐷 is 1 so the on-time intervals can be overlapped, as illustrated in Fig.3. One dimming period is equally divided into three sub-intervals of length 𝑇 =𝑇 /3 and each is allocated to one channel for charging the output capacitor. The charging phases for the three channels are denoted as 𝜑 , 𝜑 and 𝜑 with duration 𝑑 𝑇 ,𝑑 𝑇 and 𝑑 𝑇 , respectively, where 𝑑 ,𝑑 and 𝑑 are the duty ratios of the charging phases. The upper limit for 𝑑 ,𝑑 and 𝑑 is 1/3. Typically 𝑑 =𝐷 /3 but can be a different value when variable dimming frequency is utilized, as will be explained in Section IV. For channel 1, the on-time interval 𝐷 𝑇 has two parts. The Fig. 2. Circuit block diagram for proposed LED driver 4 first part is 𝑑 𝑇 , during which both 𝜑 and 𝜑 are high, characteristics, therefore optimal voltage is applied across when the boost converter charges the output capacitor and each string to ensure minimal power loss. Power consumption in a LED string (𝑃 ) can be expressed in terms of LEDs supplies the LED string. In the second part, 𝜑 is low and ( ) ( ) 𝜑 is high, when the capacitor is disconnected from the boost power consumption 𝑃 , switch’s power loss 𝑃 and converter and is the only power supply for the LED string. current sensor power loss (𝑃 ) as below: During the on-time interval 𝐷 𝑇 , Q is turned on  𝑃 =𝑃 +𝑃 +𝑃  simultaneously with Q , thus the LED string and the integrator When the dimming switching frequency and LED current are turned on and off at the same time. Hence the integrator is and 𝑃 would are set to desired values, the power losses 𝑃 called a synchronous integrator. Although the channel voltage be constants. Therefore, the string’s power consumption varies is regulated only during the first part of the on-time interval, according to 𝑃 . the powerful and robust synchronous integral control is able to bring it to a steady state value which produces the desired  𝑃 =𝑉 ×𝐼 LED current under a wide range of operating conditions. The where other two channels have similar working principle. The key idea of the proposed timing scheme is the  𝑉 =𝑉 −∆𝑉 −∆𝑉  separation of the capacitor’s charge interval and the LED Since constant LED current and switching frequency lead string’s on-time interval for a channel, which is implemented to constant ∆𝑉 and ∆𝑉 , the string’s power loss is just a by isolating the switch 𝑄 from 𝑄 , and that the non- function of the bus voltage. This is very important when the overlapped charging phases along with diode 𝐷 isolate the driver works in flexible dimming mode and each string has its output capacitors to avoid short circuit among them during own dimming ratio. Due to different junction temperature and 𝑑 𝑇 ,𝑑 𝑇 and 𝑑 𝑇 . Meanwhile, the on-time intervals 𝐷 𝑇 , aging factor, the I-V characteristics of the strings would be 𝐷 𝑇 and 𝐷 𝑇 can be overlapped, allowing all LED strings to different and independent current control for each string is be turned on at the same time, so that the maximum value for necessary to mitigate extra power loss. As investigated in [4], the dimming ratios can be 1 and the LEDs’ capacity can be fixed bus voltage for all LED strings can degrade the fully utilized. Theoretically, the duty ratio 𝑑 of a charging efficiency up to 30%. interval can be one third of the dimming ratio 𝐷 . While in Second, the proposed LED driver offers independent practice, to prevent short circuit among output capacitors, current control of each string, which facilitates flexible dead time logic needs to be implemented between the on times dimming scheme to control each individual string by its own of 𝜑 , 𝜑 and 𝜑 , which slightly reduces the upper limit of dimming ratio. In applications where adaptive dimming technique drives divided units of channel [25, 26], the 𝑑 ,𝑑 and 𝑑 . Also note that snubber circuits should be used proposed time multiplexing algorithm can be adopted to to minimize voltage stress. When no channel capacitor is increase the accuracy of the image contrast ratio. In [4], a charged, the power supply, the inductor L, the diode D and the single time-shared regulation loop is implemented by utilizing MOSFET Q and Q are virtually turned off. Therefore, the a single current sensor and minimizing the current balance efficiency should be nearly the same as the case where there is error among strings. As will be seen in transient analysis to be no dimming. By the proposed timing plan, only one capacitor conducted in Section III, using separate current sensors in the can be charged at a time, but the LED strings can be turned on proposed LED driver will not affect the driver’s response, simultaneously. By the synchronous integral control method, since the feedback loop is robust to the change of integrator the forward current of the first LED string is regulated during gain in a wide range. 𝑑 𝑇 interval, and the output capacitor is discharged during the second part of 𝐷 𝑇 interval. (Similarly for the other III. TRANSIENT ANALYSIS AND DESIGN CONSIDERATION channels.) In case of low dimming frequency, i.e. 300Hz, and In this section, a continuous-time mathematical model of high dimming ratio, the output capacitor may be discharged the boost converter in PCCM operation is used to analyze the considerably by the end of the 𝐷 𝑇 interval, and the LED effect of the converter components on the steady state and current would deviate significantly from the rated value. To transient response. This mathematical model is fast and ensure satisfactory steady state performance and acceptable accurate enough to tackle many difficult design trade-offs and current ripple size, the driver parameters such as L, C and also ensures this accuracy at the limits [27]. The mathematical dimming frequency need to be carefully chosen based on model to be used in this paper is a third order model based on transient and steady state analysis of the circuit. Transient the basic differential equations of the boost converter and analysis to be carried out in section III shows that 1.8kHz control loop, taking all the parasitic series resistors into dimming frequency for three LED string driver achieves account. The time-domain solutions of the equations are used acceptable results for dimming ratio greater than 30%. to calculate the output voltage, the load current and other The proposed time multiplexing and control strategies are circuit variables under certain operating conditions. The designed such that independent current regulation of each equivalent circuit of a boost converter with freewheeling LED string can be attained within dedicated time interval switch is illustrated in Fig. 4. In this equivalent circuit, the 𝑑 𝑇 ,𝑑 𝑇 or 𝑑 𝑇 . This feature has two advantages. First, bus parasitic series resistance of inductor 𝑅 and switches’ on voltage adjustment is done based on each LED strings resistance 𝑅 are taken into account. Fig. 6. The equivalent circuit for discharging of L and charging of C Fig. 4. Circuit diagram of boost converter with parasitic series resistors 𝑑 𝑉 𝐶𝑅 𝑅 +𝐿 𝑑𝑉 𝑅 +𝑅 + + 𝑉 𝑑𝑡 𝐿𝐶𝑅 𝑑𝑡 𝐿𝐶𝑅 𝑅 𝑉 +𝑅 𝑉 = (13) 𝐿𝐶𝑅 with  𝑅 =𝑅 +𝑅  𝑉 (0) =𝑉   ( ) 𝑑𝑉 0 1 𝑉 −𝑉 = + (16)  𝑑𝑡 𝐶 𝑅 Fig. 5. Equivalent circuits: (a) charging phase of L (b) discharging phase of C and For simplicity, the total equivalent series resistance of the 𝑑 𝐼 𝐶𝑅 𝑅 +𝐿 𝑑𝐼 𝑅 +𝑅 + + 𝐼 LED string is denoted as 𝑅 , which includes 𝑅 and the 𝑑𝑡 𝐿𝐶𝑅 𝑑𝑡 𝐿𝐶𝑅 dimming switch’s on resistance. The forward voltage drop of 𝑉 −𝑉 = (17) the LED string is denoted as 𝑉 . The equivalent circuits of the 𝐿𝐶𝑅 charging phase of L, and the discharging phase of C are shown with in Fig. 5. Two first order differential equations, together with ( ) ( ) ( )  𝐼 0 =𝐼  the initial conditions for 𝐼 𝑡 and 𝑉 𝑡 , are given as below: ( ) 𝑑𝐼 0 1  𝐿 +𝑅 𝐼 =𝑉 = 𝑉 −𝑉 − 𝑅 𝐼 (19) _ _ 𝑑𝑡 𝐿 ( )  𝐶𝑅 +𝑉 =𝑉 ( ) Here 𝑉 is the value of 𝑉 𝑡 at the end of the preceding discharge phase of C, which can be expressed as with ( )  𝑖 0 =𝐼  𝑉 =𝑉 +𝑉 −𝑉 (20) _ _ ( )  𝑉 0 =𝑉  Meanwhile, 𝐼 is the value of 𝑖 (𝑡 ) at the end of the preceding charge phase of L, which is given by  𝑅 =𝑅 +𝑅 𝑉 𝑉 ( ) Where 𝑉 is the value of 𝑉 𝑡 at the end of the 𝐼 = +𝐼 − 𝑒 (21) 𝑅 𝑅 ( ) preceding charge phase of C, and 𝐼 is the value of 𝑖 𝑡 at the end of the preceding discharge phase of L [27]. In PCCM, Where 𝑡 depends on the duty cycle of the boost converter, the converter actually works in DCM in disguise, because the which is determined by the feedback control law. For the zero dc current in a DCM case is now replaced by a constant closed loop system with integral control, the duty cycle 𝐷 is 𝐼 [24]. Thus we have: approximately a linear function of the integrator voltage (𝑉 ). Based on the proposed control strategy, 𝐷 for the first string  DCM: 𝐼 =0 can be expressed in terms of the closed loop gain K and  CCM: 0<𝐼 <∞ switching time period of the boost converter (T ), when 𝑄 is turned on.  PCCM: 𝐼 =𝐼 The equivalent circuit of the phase when the inductor  𝐷 =− −𝑉 𝑑𝑡 + 𝐷  discharges and the capacitor is charged is depicted in Fig. 6. where The second order differential equations for this equivalent circuit, together with two initial conditions, are given as  𝑉 =𝑖 ×𝑅 +𝑉 follows:  𝑇 = 1⁄400000 Since the LED current is a function of the output voltage, to save space, only the output voltage is plotted to examine the effects of design parameters such as C, L, the integrator gain K and the dimming frequency on the transient responses. The figures shown below are computational results based on the mathematical model for a triple LED strings in parallel and 5 LEDs in each string with rated current of 350mA. The dimming ratio for the string is 95%, which is about the worst case, when maximum capacitor discharging time occurs. Fig.7 shows the effect of L on the transient response. It can be seen Fig. 9. Output voltage transient response for different values of K that larger inductance reduces overshoot and undershoot, but increases settling time. In case of low dimming ratio, the boost converter has smaller charging time 𝑑 𝑇 . Thus a driver with larger inductance cannot boost up the output capacitor voltage. Fig. 8 shows the transient response for several values of the output capacitor. Increasing the capacitance will decrease the voltage overshoot and steady state LED current deviation but slow down the response and increase voltage undershoot. The transient responses of output voltage for 3 values of K are illustrated in Fig. 9. By increasing the integrator gain K, the output voltage oscillation is increased but the settling time is decreased. For K greater than 5000, the closed loop system Fig. 10. Output voltage response to the change of reference current is unstable. Good transient response is attained for K within [400, 1000]. Larger K results in faster start-up and transient following the reference signal. The stability of the closed-loop response, thus higher values are preferred, especially when system is further verified with the Bode plots in Figure 11, for there are more parallel LED strings. the open loop transfer function obtained at the nominal Fig.10 depicts the response of output voltage to the change operating condition (350mA LED current, 7.8V power supply of the reference current, where the value of the reference LED voltage) , which shows an infinity gain margin and a phase current is 350mA for 𝑡∈ 0,0.4 ; 35mA for 𝑡 ∈ (0.4,0.8 and margin of 84.1 degree. Within the operating range of 35mA to 350mA for 𝑡 0.8𝑠 . The voltage response in the figure 350mA LED current and 5.2V to 8.8V power supply voltage, demonstrates robust stability and desired transient response in the least phase margin of 68.6 degree is obtained under the operating condition of 35mA LED current and 8.8V power supply voltage, under which the duty ratio for the booster converter main switch is minimal (2.8%). The dimming frequency has a large effect on the steady Fig. 7. Transient response of output voltage for different inductance Fig. 8. Output voltage transient response for different capacitance Fig. 11. Bode Diagram under nominal operating condition 7 IV. VARIABLE DIMMING FREQUENCY FOR ENHANCED PERFORMANCE The mathematical simulation for low dimming ratios shows that, the response time of the boost converter is not fast enough to reach the steady state at high dimming frequency. This imperfection leads to undesirable waveform with considerable undershoot for dimming ratio less than 30%, and makes the LED driver unstable for dimming ratios 15% and lower. Fig. 13 depicts transient responses of output voltage at different dimming ratios when 1.8kHz dimming frequency is implemented. While 90% and 60% dimming ratios yield Fig. 12. Transient response of LED current for 1.8kHz dimming frequency and 90% dimming ratio acceptable responses, lower dimming ratios give slower rise up voltage. The settling time at 25% dimming ratio is 2.62sec, state deviation of LED current. Lower dimming frequency which causes significant LED current undershoots. At 12% leads to longer discharging time. Hence, the output capacitor dimming ratio, the voltage response gets worse and cannot will be more discharged and the LED current will decrease reach the required steady state value. more significantly. On the other hand, higher dimming To deal with these issues, a variable dimming frequency frequency decreases circuit efficiency, and at low dimming strategy is devised in the proposed LED driver to achieve ratio, the output capacitor voltage cannot reach the required satisfactory transient response and nearly square current steady state. Therefore, based on the mathematical transient waveform at steady state for all dimming ratios. With this analysis, a compromise among response time, overt shoot, strategy, the dimming frequency for one string is decreased in undershoot and current deviation must be taken. With regard 2 steps as a function of the dimming ratio. The function is to the circuit configuration and the parameters of the LED defined as below: strings, 1/𝑇 =1.8kHz is picked as the dimming frequency, which yields satisfactory transient and steady state response 𝐹, 𝐷 ≥ 0.3 for dimming ratio greater than 30%.  𝐹 = 𝐹 2, 0.15 ≤ 𝐷 < 0.3  Fig. 12 shows the transient response of LED current in one 𝐹3 ⁄, 𝐷 < 0.15 period at 1.8kHz dimming frequency. Exponential decaying Where 𝐹 is the dimming frequency for a LED string, D is current response is expected during the discharging phase. the dimming ratio and F is the main dimming frequency, With a high dimming frequency, the discharge interval is short which is selected as 1.8kHz based on the transient analysis for and the decrease of the current appears to be a straight line. this particular application. To avoid short circuit among LED The last consideration in the proposed method is the number strings, the main-dimming frequency (1.8kHz) must be of parallel strings. Similar issues with regard to scalability has divisible by an individual string’s dimming frequency. The been discussed in [21] for a SIMO buck LED driver. In case of highest frequency that fulfills the aforementioned condition N parallel LED strings, the driver should reach the reference and yields desired LED current waveform can be picked as the current in 1𝑁 ⁄ dimming period T during the capacitor’s next sub-dimming frequency. This strategy helps to prevent charging interval and keep the LED current deviation in an considerable undershoot and reduces the minimum achievable acceptable range during the discharging interval of the contrast ratio. On the other hand, higher frequency is still ( )⁄ capacitor, which is 𝑁− 1 𝑁 of T . For a constant boost adopted for higher dimming ratio to avoid considerable converter frequency, transient analysis need to be conducted to capacitor discharge and maintain the LED current deviation in investigate the trade-off among the circuit parameters such as an acceptable range. dimming frequency, integrator gain, inductor and capacitor To demonstrate the modified switching signals under the values, and 𝐼 of PCCM operation. Analysis reveals that variable dimming frequency scheme, the timing diagram for decreasing the frequency of the boost converter and increasing the three strings with different dimming ratios is presented in 𝐼 can improve the transient response at low dimming ratio, Fig. 14, where the dimming ratios are 90%, 25% and 10% for since low frequency allows the capacitor longer time to charge the first, the second and the third string, respectively. The and the boost converter works like a single output converter proposed switching strategy is simpler than the counterpart in during the charge interval. Another alternative approach is to [28, 29] but more efficient. The corresponding dimming adopt supercapacitors which are compatible with the nature of frequency for each LED string is determined as below: the proposed switching scheme. Supercapacitors can act as  F =2F = 3F =1/T =1.8KHZ D1 D2 D3 D1 output capacitor of boost converter with high frequency switching. On the other hand, it can work as battery in  F =1/T =900HZ D2 D2 discharging intervals of LED configuration with higher  F =1/T =600HZ D3 D3 number of parallel strings or series LEDs to maintain the LED current within desired range. where  T =3T D1 8 Fig. 13. Output voltage transient response for different dimming ratios Fig. 15. Output voltage transient responses to 12% dimming ratio dimming ratio equal or less than 15%, the LED string works with 3T = 9T dimming period. In this scenario, the D1 maximum charging interval of 𝑇 is still attainable for all range of dimming ratios equal or less than 15%. For instance, the charging interval for 14% dimming ratio would be 𝑇 , the on-time interval would be 0.14 × 9𝑇 = 1.26𝑇 , and the discharge interval when the LED string is solely fed by the capacitor is 0.26T. On the other hand, for dimming ratios less than 11%, the charging interval could be selected the same as the on-time interval, since the maximum attainable charging interval is greater than the required dimming time. Again, this ensures that the charging interval of the third LED string (𝜑 ) is terminated before the first LED string’s charging starts (𝜑 ), without any short circuit. Fig. 15 shows the effect of reducing dimming frequency on the output voltage’s transient response at 12% dimming ratio. A 900Hz dimming frequency improves the transient response, but the settling time of 0.6061Sec for 12% dimming ratio is not satisfactory. Further decreasing the dimming frequency to 600Hz yields better transient response and consequently acceptable LED current undershoots. The modified switching scheme allows the LED driver to use different dimming frequencies for each string Fig. 14. Modified timing diagram under variable dimming frequency scheme without switching signal interference, while maintaining the flexible dimming scheme and yields desired waveforms.  T =2T =6T D2 D1 Higher efficiency is another byproduct of applying the  T =3T =9T D3 D1 variable dimming frequency scheme. First it reduces the Since the dimming period of the second LED string is switching loss by applying lower dimming frequency; Second, selected as 2T = 6T, the charging and discharging phases D1 utilizing maximum attainable charge interval further improves may take T and 5T long, respectively. The dimming frequency efficiency at lower dimming ratio. It is noted that the corresponding to this dimming period is 900Hz, which is used efficiency increases as the dimming ratio is increased. Since when the dimming ratio is between 15% and 30%. This timing the average LED current, which contributes to the copper loss, scheme has the advantage of using the maximum length of a becomes comparable with high peak current of the inductor, charging interval, without short circuit among the channels, which yields constant power loss in all range of dimming ratio which is about 𝑇 for all range of dimming ratios between 15% when dimming frequency is constant. and 30%. For instance, if the dimming ratio for the second string is 20%, the charging interval would be 𝑇 , the on-time V. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS interval would be 0.2 × 6𝑇 = 1.2𝑇 , and the discharge interval In order to verify the proposed method, a boost converter when the LED string is solely fed by the capacitor is 0.2T. with a controller based on TMS320F28335 is used to drive Note that for low dimming ratios, it is preferred to use three LED strings, where each string consists of 5 LEDs in maximum charging duty ratio, so that the boost converter has series. The LED’s rated current is 350mA. more time to reach the steady state and to yield desired LED Fig. 16 shows the implemented control block diagram by current shape. This timing scheme ensures that the charging DSP. The outputs A , A and A of the analogue to digital 0 1 2 interval of the second LED string (𝜑 ) is ended before the converter block in Fig. 16 are the measurements of the three third LED string’s charging signal is fired (𝜑 ). In case of LED strings’ currents. The first string’s control loop block in 9 Fig. 16. Experimental control block diagram Fig. 17. Expanded block diagram of first string control loop Fig. 16 is expanded in Fig. 17, where the measured current is compared with the reference value (0.35A) and the error is digitally integrated to generate a duty cycle for the boost converter. The control loop also generates the dimming frequency based on the dimming ratio and switching signals for charging the capacitors and dimming the LEDs. The dimming frequency block in Fig. 17, is a periodic counter based on the frequency of CPU and determines the dimming frequency. The dimming ratio is used to determine the charging duty cycle and dimming duty cycle. The charging duty cycle blocks and the dimming duty cycle blocks for the three strings generate three non-overlapped charging signals, 𝜑 , , and overlapped dimming signals 𝜑 , , respectively. The control loop blocks for other strings are similar to that of the first string, except for that the dimming frequency, charging duty cycle and dimming duty cycle blocks Fig. 18. Photograph of a prototype board are determined separately based on the dimming ratio of an A photo of the prototype board is presented in Fig. 18, individual string. The dimming PWM block creates required where the rulers beside it shows the size of 1.88in by 1.69in. dimming switching signals for Q and Q . The sum of Out1 2 3 For easy reference, numbers are assigned in Fig. 18 beside the from the three control loop blocks is used to generate the components : #1 -- inductor; #2-4 -- output capacitors; #5-8 - intended switching signal for Q for the boost converter via - 8 MOSFETs; #9-11 – diodes; #12-14 -- current sense the boost converter PWM block in Fig. 16, which is resistors; #15, 16-- quad MOSFET drivers; #17--quad Op- implemented to the MOSFET Q via a high frequency Amp; #18--power supply, ground and control voltage MOSFET driver. To ensure safe switching and to prevent connectors; #19--connector for switching signals of Q , Q , 1 2 short circuit among LED strings, dead time is applied to non- Q and Q ; #20 -- connector for LED strings, analogue output 5 8 overlapped switching signals and is set to 16s. Therefore, the signals and switching signals of Q , Q and Q ; #21-- 3 6 9 duty ratio of charging interval should be kept unchanged for connector for switching signal of Q . dimming ratios more than 97%. 10 TABLE I CIRCUIT PARAMETERS Symbol Description Value F boost converter freq. 400kHz F main dimming freq. 1.8kHz V dc input voltage 7.8V in L inductance 7.4 µH th C n output capacitance 2000 µF On th R n current sense 0.1 Ω Sn resistor th D n rectifying diode PMEG10020ELR th Q n MOSFET FDC6401N - MOSFET driver TC4468 - Op-Amp LTI1359 Fig. 20. LED current start-up response for (a) 4% dimming ratio (b) 95% dimming ratio due to higher temperature caused by larger average LED current which reduces the forward voltage or the equivalent series resistance [31]. The difference between the final values of capacitor voltages verifies that individual bus voltage adjustment is attained based on the proposed current regulation control scheme which leads to minimal power loss of the LED strings. The start-up responses of LED currents for channel 1 (4% dimming ratio) and channel 2 (95% dimming ratio) are depicted in Fig. 20. The first LED string with 4% dimming ratio takes 0.168Sec to reach the final value of 350mA, while the second LED string with 95% dimming ratio Fig. 19. Output voltage start-up responses (a) 4% dimming ratio (b) 95% takes 0.047Sec. It comes to the conclusion that decreasing the dimming ratio dimming frequency to one third would still result in acceptable transient response of the LED current. Fig. 21 shows the The key parameters of the prototype circuit are provided in steady state periodic waveforms of LED string currents with Table 1. The steady state waveforms are captured by a 4- 95% uniform dimming ratio for all channels. Note that the channel oscilloscope and the transient responses are recorded LED currents shown in the oscilloscopes are scaled up by 10. by a 24 bit DAQ card (NI 9239), and then plotted by MATLAB. Figs. 19 and 20 show the start-up responses from experiment, where 4% and 95% dimming ratios are applied to the first and the second string, respectively. Fig. 19(a) shows the start-up response of capacitor voltage for the first string with dimming ratio 4%. The voltage rises up smoothly at a rate about 0.032(𝑉 𝑚𝑆 ⁄ ) with settling time of 95.83 𝑚𝑆 , and reaches 11.41V at steady state. The second string’s capacitor voltage is plotted in Fig 19.(b), with a 95% dimming ratio. It rises up faster at a rate about 0.209(𝑉 𝑚𝑆 ) and a settling time of 10.93 𝑚𝑆 . Although the capacitor’s voltage reaches about 10.62V at steady state, it continues to decrease due to the current regulation function of the LED driver, in reaction to the increasing junction temperature and the temperature dependent I-V curve of the LED string. Similar voltage response has been observed in [30]. For the channel with higher dimming ratio, the output steady state voltage is lower Fig. 21. Steady state results for 95% dimming ratio 11 TABLE II CURRENT IMBALANCE AND DEVIATION FOR 95% UNIFORM DIMMING Avg. Current Current Description Current(mA) imbalance(%) deviation(%) String 1 344 0.09 -1.71 String 2 344 0.09 -1.71 String 3 343 -0.19 -2.00 It can be seen that the on time interval of one string has two parts. The first part is the charging interval, which is marked by larger peak to peak value (thicker line), when the output capacitor is charged by the boost converter. The second part is the discharging interval, which is marked by smaller peak to peak value (thinner line), when the LED string is solely fed by the capacitor. The LED currents slightly increase during charging intervals, which results from the charging current of the boost converter and is an effect of the current regulation of Fig. 23. Steady state results for 4% dimming ratio the integral control. While in a discharging interval, since the LED string is solely fed by the capacitor, the capacitor voltage should decrease. However, this decrease is almost invisible in the oscilloscope waveforms owing to the proper choice of switching frequency and boost converter parameters. To measure the current imbalance among the three strings, denote ∑( ) the average of on-time currents as 𝐼 = 1/3 𝐼 ,where 𝐼 is the average on-time current of the nth LED string. Then the current imbalance for each string can be expressed as:  Current imbalance = 𝐼 −𝐼 𝐼  Table 2 shows the measured average on-time string currents, current imbalance and current deviation from the reference value at 95% uniform dimming ratio. Negligible current imbalance makes the proposed LED driver a perfect match for applications where uniform brightness is required. Figs. 22 and 23 show the steady state current waveforms at Fig. 24. Steady state results for 90%, 23% and 4% dimming ratio 20% and 4% uniform dimming ratio, where the switching frequency is reduced to 900Hz and 600Hz, respectively, by the Fig. 24 demonstrates the flexible dimming capability of the variable dimming frequency scheme. These figures validate proposed LED driver, where the first string works at 90% the desirable performance of the LED driver with the proposed dimming ratio (bottom curve), the second string at 23% control scheme, and that nearly square current waveforms are (middle) and the third string at 4% (top). Table 3 presents the generated within a wide range of dimming ratio. measured average string currents, current imbalance and current deviation from reference value for the three strings with 90%, 23% and 4% dimming ratios. Fig. 25 is generated to show both the LED current and the bus voltage for the first and the third strings. In this figure, CH1 and CH2 of the oscilloscope (two curves at bottom) represent the LED current and bus voltage of the third string with 4% dimming ratio, and CH3 and CH4 (two curves on top) represent the LED current and bus voltage for the first string at 90% dimming ratio. The bus voltages are adjusted to 11.36V and 10.48V for the third and the first string, respectively. Each bus voltage should increase during the capacitor’s charge interval and decrease during its discharge interval. Owing to the proper choice of LED driver parameters and control scheme, there is only slight increase of bus voltage during the charge interval and the decrease during discharge interval is almost invisible. It is also observed that there is visible ripple and noise in the bus voltage during the charge Fig. 22. Steady state results for 20% dimming ratio Fig. 27. Close-up view of steady state waveform at 50% dimming ratio Fig. 25. Steady state results for 90% and 4% dimming ratio TABLE III CURRENT IMBALANCE AND DEVIATION FOR VARIABLE DIMMING SCHEME Avg. Current Current Description Current(mA) imbalance(%) deviation(%) String 1 346 -0.86 -1.14 String 2 350 0.29 0 String 3 351 0.57 0.28 interval, which is caused by high frequency switching of the boost converter. The maximal peak to peak ripple for the bus voltage is less than 0.84V. Fig. 28. LED driver efficiency Fig. 26 depicts the periodic inductor current waveform (middle curve) at steady state, together with the first LED 900Hz, the same as that of the string with the lowest dimming string’s current and bus voltage (bottom and top curves), when ratio. the three LED strings work at different dimming ratios, 50%, Fig. 27 is a close-up view of Fig. 26, which shows the 95% and 23%, respectively. By the variable dimming waveforms in a few switching periods of the boost converter frequency scheme, the dimming frequency for the string with when one channel’s capacitor is charged. The inductor current 23% dimming ratio is 900Hz while the other two strings’ waveform (the middle curve) indicates that the boost converter dimming frequencies are 1.8kHz. The inductor current operates at PCCM. Note that the inductor current decreases waveform in Fig. 26 shows two charging intervals for the first when freewheel switching is activated, since the current loop string (50% dimming), two charging intervals for the second is not lossless. The parasitic series resistance of L, the on- string (95% dimming), and one charging interval for the third resistance of Q , wiring, and bonding are some factors leading string (23% dimming). The inductor current’s frequency is to the drop of the inductor current [24]. Fig. 26 shows that flat capacitor voltage during discharging interval of capacitors is attained to recover the LEDs current instantly after the boost converter is turned on for the next dimming cycle. On the other hand, in Fig. 27, PCCM keeps the inductor current nearly constant during off time interval of the boost converter to improve the transient response. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed LED driver, the RMS values of LED currents, voltages across the LED strings, power supply current and voltage are measured. The LED driver’s efficiency can be computed as (33), ∑ 𝑉 𝐼 𝐸𝑓𝑓𝑖𝑐𝑖𝑦𝑒𝑛𝑐 = (33) 𝑉 𝐼 Where V is the RMS voltage across the nth LED string, I n n is the RMS current of the nth LED string, V is the power in supply voltage and I is the power supply current. Fig. 28 in plots the efficiency versus the dimming ratio, when the same Fig. 26. Steady state results for 50% dimming ratio 13 [10] Y. Hu and M. M. Jovanovic, “A novel LED driver with adaptive drive dimming ratio is applied to all LED strings. The maximal voltage,” in Proc. IEEE Appl. Power Electron. Conf., pp. 565–571, efficiency occurred at about 80% dimming ratio. On account of the variable dimming frequency strategy, the efficiency has [11] S.-S. Hong, S.-H. Lee, S.-H. Cho, C.-W. Roh, and S.-K. Han, “A new cost effective current-balancing multi-channel LED driver for a large been improved about 3% at 20% dimming ratio as compared screen LCD backlight units,” J. Power Electron., vol.10, no.4, pp. 351– to the constant dimming frequency scheme. 356, Jul. 2010. [12] S. M. Baddela and D. S. Zinger, “Parallel connected LEDs operated at VI. CONCLUSION high frequency to improve current sharing,” in Proc. IEEE Ind. Appl. Soc., pp. 1677–1681, 2004. A novel multiple string LED driver is proposed in this paper [13] M. Tahan, D. Bamgboje and T. Hu, “Hybrid control system in an efficient LED driver“,2018 Annual American Control Conference by combining synchronous integral control and variable (ACC), Milwaukee, WI, 2018. dimming frequency scheme. The driver is highly efficient, has [14] S. M. Baddela and D. S. Zinger, “Parallel connected LEDs operated at high performance and a compact configuration due to the high frequency to improve current sharing,” in Proc. IEEE 39th Ind. utilization of a single inductor multiple output boost converter. Appl. Soc. Annu. Meet. Conf., vol. 3, pp. 1677–1681, Oct. 2004. [15] M. Doshi, and R. Zane, “Control of solid-state lamps using a multiphase Independent bus voltage adjustment, which is attained by a pulse width modulation technique.” IEEE Trans. Power Electronics, vol. novel time multiplexing algorithm and synchronous 25, no. 7, pp. 1894-1904, 2010. integrators, minimizes the power loss and improves the [16] H.-J. Chiu and S.-J. Cheng, “LED backlight driving system for large- scale LCD panels,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 54, no. 5, pp. 2751– efficiency and current balance accuracy. Moreover, the 2760, Oct. 2007. proposed variable dimming frequency scheme allows each [17] C. Chang, “Integrated LED driving device with current sharing for string to have independent control of dimming ratio in a wide multiple LED strings,” U.S. Patent 6 621 235, Sep. 16, 2003. [18] S. Li, Y. Guo, A. Lee, S. Tan and S. Y. Hui, “Precise and Full-Range range, which reduces the minimum achievable contrast ratio to Dimming Control for an Off-Line Single-Inductor-Multiple-Output LED 4%. The PCCM operation is adopted in the boost converter to Driver,” in Proc. IEEE ECCE2016, Milwaukee, WI, Sept. 2016. yield fast transient response and very small deviation of output [19] S. Li, Y. Guo, A. Lee, S. Tan and S. Y. Hui, “An Off-Line Single- Inductor Multiple-Outputs LED Driver with High Dimming Precision voltages and LED currents. Detailed analysis is conducted on and Full Dimming Range,” IEEE Trans. Power Electronics, vol. PP transient performance by using mathematical models. The Issue 99, pp. 1-1, 2017. desirable steady state and transient response performances are [20] M. Tahan, H. Monsef and S. Farhangi, “A new converter fault verified with a prototype driver circuit for three LED strings, discrimination method for a 12-pulse high-voltage direct current system based on wavelet transform and hidden markov models,” Simulation, which achieves a current balance error below 1% via the vol. 88, no. 6, pp. 668-679, 2012. proposed flexible dimming scheme and a dimming range [21] H. Wang, M. Tahan, and T. Hu, “Effects of rest time on equivalent between 4% to 100%. circuit model for a li-ion battery,” 2016 Annual American Control Conference (ACC), pp. 3101–3106, Boston, MA. [22] T. Hu, “A nonlinear system approach to analysis and design of power electronic converter with saturation and bilinear terms,” IEEE Trans. Power Electronics, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 399-410, Feb. 2011. [23] Y. Yao, F. Fassinou, T. Hu, “Stability and robust regulation of battery REFERENCES driven boost converter with simple feedback,” IEEE Trans. Power [1] H. -J. Chiu, Y.-K. Lo, J.-T. Chen, S.-J. Cheng, C.-Y. Lin, and S.-C. Electronics, vol.26, no. 9, pp. 2614-2626, Sep. 2011. Mou, “A high-efficiency dimmable LED driver for low-power lighting [24] D. Ma, W.-H. Ki, and C.-Y. Tsui, “A Pseudo-CCM/DCM SIMO application.” IEEE trans. Industrial Electronics, vol. 57, no. 2, pp 735- Switching Converter With Freewheel Switching,” IEEE Journal of 743, 2010. Solid-State Circuits, vol. 38, no. 6, June 2003. [2] S. Choi, T. Kim, “Symmetric current balancing circuit for LED [25] M.Tahan, H.Monsef, “HVDC Converter Fault Discrimination using backlight with dimming.” IEEE Trans. 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Wu, “A capacitor-isolated LED driver with characteristics of GaInN light-emitting diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, inherent current balance capability,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 59, 121103 (2013). no. 4, pp. 1708–1716, Apr. 2012. Mohammad Tahan (S’15) received the B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering in 2006 and his M.Sc. degree in Power electronics from University of Tehran in 2009. Currently he is PhD student at UMass Lowell. His research interests include application of Artificial Intelligence in power electronics, high performance dc/dc converter design, LED driving systems, control applications and battery modeling. Tingshu Hu (SM’01) received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China, in 1985 and 1988, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, in 2001. She was a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Santa Barbara. In January 2005, she joined the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, where she is currently a Professor. Her research interests include nonlinear systems theory, optimization, robust control theory, battery modeling and evaluation, and control applications in power electronics.

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Electrical Engineering and Systems SciencearXiv (Cornell University)

Published: Jan 31, 2020

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