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InfraRed Astronomy Satellite Swarm Interferometry (IRASSI): Overview and Study Results

InfraRed Astronomy Satellite Swarm Interferometry (IRASSI): Overview and Study Results The far-infrared (FIR) regime is one of the few wavelength ranges where no astronomical data with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution exist yet. Neither of the medium-term satellite projects like SPICA, Millimetron or OST will resolve this malady. For many research areas, however, information at high spatial and spectral resolution in the FIR, taken from atomic ne-structure lines, from highly excited carbon monoxide (CO) and especially from water lines would open the door for transformative science. These demands call for interferometric concepts. We present here rst results of our feasibility study IRASSI (Infrared Astronomy Satellite Swarm Interferometry) for an FIR space interferometer. Extending on the principal concept of the previ- ous study ESPRIT, it features heterodyne interferometry within a swarm of ve satellite elements. The satellites can drift in and out within a range of several hundred meters, thereby achieving spatial resolutions of <0.1 arcsec over the whole wavelength range of 1{6 THz. Precise knowledge on the base- lines will be ensured by metrology methods employing laser-based optical fre- quency combs, for which preliminary ground-based tests have been designed by members of our study team. We rst give a motivation on how the science requirements translate into operational and design parameters for IRASSI. Our consortium has put much emphasis on the navigational aspects of such a free- ying swarm of satellites operating in relatively close vicinity. We hence Preprint submitted to Advances in Space Research July 19, 2019 arXiv:1907.07989v1 [astro-ph.IM] 18 Jul 2019 present work on the formation geometry, the relative dynamics of the swarm, and aspects of our investigation towards attitude estimation. Furthermore, we discuss issues regarding the real-time capability of the autonomous rel- ative positioning system, which is an important aspect for IRASSI where, due to the large raw data rates expected, the interferometric correlation has to be done onboard, in quasi-real-time. We also address questions regard- ing the spacecraft architecture and how a rst thermomechanical model is used to study the e ect of thermal perturbations on the spacecraft. This will have implications for the necessary internal calibration of the local tie between the laser metrology and the phase centres of the science signals and will ultimately a ect the accuracy of the baseline estimations. Keywords: Far-Infrared, Heterodyne Interferometry, Formation Flying, Laser Metrology, Attitude Estimation 1. Introduction Many astronomical breakthroughs came with the advance of observing capabilities and the improvement of the achievable spatial resolution. The Hubble satellite has been delivering di raction-limited data with a spatial resolution of better than 0.1 arcsec in the Optical and UV for 25 years now. In the near-infrared (NIR) one has learned to overcome the disturbing e ects of the turbulent atmosphere by means of adaptive optics, enabling observa- tions with spatial resolutions of better than 0.1 arcsec when combined with 8{10 m class telescopes. Even better spatial resolution is achievable in the in- frared when combining several telescopes in long-baseline interferometry with facilities like the VLTI or the Keck interferometer. In the radio regime, from early on the adoption of interferometry has been a prime concept. VLBI tech- niques achieve sub-milli-arcsec resolution up to frequencies of 86 GHz (and even to 230 GHz; see, e.g., Doeleman et al., 2008). Common interferome- try has spread to ever higher (sub-)millimeter frequencies, with arrays like NOEMA, SMA and especially ALMA as the current state of the art. Hence, we can access the sky at many wavelength regimes with high spatial resolu- tion already. The Far-Infrared (FIR) is a noticable exception. One commonly assigns the wavelength range from 30{300 m (10{1 THz) to the FIR. In this range, the Earth atmosphere is very opaque in general. In particular, in the interval from 2{6 THz, the transmission never rises above 1{3 % even at the best observing sites from the ground, like Dome C in Antarctica (Schneider 2 et al., 2009). Thus, high- ying airborne or space-borne telescopes are imper- ative to collect astronomical information in the FIR. Currently, the spatial resolution obtainable by the previous and by the currently planned missions is modest. In Fig. 1, we have compiled a plot of the theoretical angular reso- lution by several past, present and future missions, to depict the situation. A few comments are in order for this plot. The grey area marks the actual FIR range. The lines denote the theoretical spatial resolution (more precisely, the full width at half maximum of the telescope primary beam) for a uniformly illuminated circular re ector with the nominal size given for these telescopes in the literature. Hence, we neglect that several of these telescopes are not di raction-limited at all wavelengths, and that the re ectors may be tapered or combined with an undersized secondary mirror, which all diminishes the spatial resolution slightly. We have left out the variety of single-dish balloon missions, which, as far as we know, do not currently feature primary mirrors larger than 3 m. While dashed lines mark the full wavelength range covered by these missions, solid lines show the part of the working range where high spectral resolution (at least approaching a resolution of 10 or better) is avail- able. Currently, the best angular resolution in the FIR has been achieved by Herschel. Also the actively planned single-satellite missions like SPICA (Roelfsema et al., 2018), the Origins Space Telescope (OST; Staguhn et al., 2018), or Millimetron (Kardashev et al., 2014) will not push the limit below 1 arcsec (at least not in the 50{300 m sub-range of the FIR), although these missions have great merits in being much more sensitive than previous FIR observatories. Only the two-telescope concept previously brought forward for the FIR direct-detection interferometer SPIRIT (Leisawitz et al., 2007) ap- proaches the sub-arcsecond regime. Its path nder missions BETTII (Rizzo et al., 2016) { and hopefully BETTII 2 { both balloon experiments using two siderostats on a xed 8-m baseline, also just achieve slightly better than 1 arcsec resolution at 6 THz, but already improve on the Herschel spatial resolution. This status quo suggests to contemplate about future missions that can at- tain high spatial resolution to ll the gap in the FIR. In the following, we will give a short motivation for selected astrophysical tracers in the FIR. Then we will introduce our concept for a free- ying FIR interferometer, IRASSI, with emphasis on the choice of some of the technical parameters. Furthermore, For OST the optimistic value of 9 m is used (\Concept-1", Staguhn et al., 2018). 3 Figure 1: Spatial resolution comparison of previous existing FIR missions and for new FIR projects and studies. Solid lines indicate wavelength ranges where high spectral resolution is available. The grey rectangle denotes the FIR range. we mention recent progress in several technological elds that is necessary to make such a mission possible. We then provide an overview of the system architecture and the navigational aspects of our mission study. The paper concludes with an overall summary and outlook on a few key questions that have to be investigated in our upcoming second study phase. 2. Scienti c Motivation The FIR regime contains some unique tracers of di erent kinds of as- trophysical environments. While other references cover the potential science in the FIR in much more detail (e.g., Rigopoulou et al., 2017; Pontoppidan et al., 2018; Kardashev et al., 2014), we just want to highlight a few aspects regarding the unique tracers we nd in the FIR regime. Some of these will 4 also emphasise why high spectral and spatial resolution bring a new dimen- sion to many of the science cases. The FIR covers many of the most important cooling lines of the inter- stellar medium. These are predominantly atomic ne-structure lines, like the [CII] transition at 157.7 m, the [OI] transitions at 63.2 and 145.5 m, the [OIII] lines at 51.8 and 88.4 m, and the [NII] lines at 121.9 and 205.2 m. Those lines (together with [CI] lines at sub-mm wavelengths) contribute to the energy budget of large parts of a molec- ular cloud at low and intermediate densities. Hence, in order to under- stand the complete thermodynamics of the star-formation process in molecular clouds, such tracers are very valuable probes. With velocity- resolved spectral maps in these lines (and complementary ground-based data in lines tracing the dense cold molecular gas), a comparison of the dynamics of the atomic and the molecular gas phase is possible. In particular, [CII] bears importance also as a star-formation tracer in ex- tragalactic studies, which makes it imperative to understand the [CII] emission in Galactic star-forming regions to be able to extrapolate. We note that [ CII] can attain high optical depths (Ossenkopf et al., 2013). A triple of [ CII] hyper ne-structure lines exists as well around 1.9 THz, with the closest component separated by just  11 km/s from the [ CII] line. These isotope lines can be used to assess the optical depth of the main line; obviously, high spectral resolution is mandatory here to disentangle the lines. A strong motivation for observations from space is to observe many transitions of the water molecule H O, a task that is notoriously dif- cult from the ground. Water is relatively easily removed from grain surfaces and hence quite abundant in warmed-up regions, and also in the presence of shocks. Furthermore, in circumstellar disks, the direct detection of water gas in a spatially resolved fashion gives precious information about the water budget in such disks, and would more directly indicate where the (water) snow line is located. This would give very valuable input to gauge planet-formation scenarios. Previous studies showed a low Herschel/HIFI detection rate of H O ground-state transitions at longer wavelengths for a small sample of TTauri disks (Du et al., 2017). However, two studies for T Tauri disks and for Herbig Ae disks by Notsu et al. (2016, 2017) present modelling of higher-excited water lines that better trace the central disk part and are not easily 5 excited in the thinner disk atmosphere. Notsu et al. did not consider the possibility that one could spatially resolve H O emission from in- side the water-snow line in the FIR. But given the maximum baseline lengths for IRASSI, an angular resolution of around 20 milli-arcsec can be achieved for some of such lines, which corresponds to roughly 3 au at the distance of several nearby low-mass star-forming regions (140 pc). Hence, for protoplanetary disks moderately close to Earth, IRASSI could separate the water-gas emission from inside the water-snow line from emission arising from the disk upper layers further out. Molecular gas is predominantly consisting of H molecules which, how- ever, do not possess a permanent dipole moment. Only quite hot H gas can be seen in quadrupole rotational and roto-vibrational transi- tions in the near- and mid-infrared. The singly deuterated isotopologue hydrogen deuteride (HD) has a rotational spectrum, and may be used as a unique proxy to the bulk reservoir of molecular gas in a variety of contexts. Its usefulness as a disk mass tracer, cum grano salis, has recently been shown in works based on Herschel/PACS spectra (Bergin et al., 2013; McClure et al., 2016). The rst two rotational transitions lie at 112.1 m and 56.2 m. Employing HD as a tool is hence a unique capability of the FIR range. The FIR contains a ladder of high-lying rotational transitions for the abundant molecule CO, with upper level energies E /k ranging from up B 249 K up to several thousands of Kelvin. Such tracers probe the warm and hot molecular gas, for instance close to low- and high-mass proto- stars. Having velocity-resolved data at hand is pivotal for disentangling gas directly heated by the central protostar and gas heated and com- pressed due to the presence of shocks. Regarding the continuum sensitivity at the high frequencies of the FIR, a heterodyne interferometer might be at a disadvantage compared to direct-detection interferometers and bolometers with their wide band- widths. Fortunately, in the FIR we catch the dust continuum emission from cold and embedded objects at the peak of their spectral energy dis- tributions. Combining this with the fact that the development of sen- sitive and wide bandwidth heterodyne receivers and backends steadily progresses, it will be possible to deliver high-resolution maps of the FIR continuum for many dust-dominated astrophysical object classes. One 6 very promising aspect in connection with the strong FIR continuum is the detection of gas lines in absorption against the continuum. High spectral resolution can reveal line asymmetries which hint at infall mo- tions. With the instrument GREAT (Heyminck et al., 2012) aboard the SOFIA facility it has been possible to exploit a NH line at around 1.81 THz for that purpose (Wyrowski et al., 2012, 2016). With a beam size of 16 , it was possible to trace inward motions with SOFIA on larger scales, averaged over the extended envelope of a few high-mass protostars. With a facility like IRASSI, we can pinpoint on a hundred times ner scale how the true infall rate is towards the actual protostar. In conclusion, a FIR interferometer like IRASSI can exploit the unique line tracers that this wavelength range provides. It will be particularly fruitful for the research of structure of the planet-forming regions in circumstellar disks, as well as for gas dynamics in the close vicinity around low- and high-mass protostars. But also studies of giant molecular clouds in external galaxies, and towards AGNe, will greatly pro t from the capabilities of such a facility. 3. Principle Concept for IRASSI We present here the concept of a space-borne FIR interferometer. We gave it the name IRASSI (Infrared Astronomy Satellite Swarm Interferom- etry). Currently, this is an extended study, funded by the German Space Agency DLR, for which three German research institutes and an industry partner have joined forces. The initial ideas for IRASSI are strongly rooted in the previous study ESPRIT (Wild et al., 2008) that had been published 11 years ago, and which was one contribution to the FIRI initiative for the ESA Cosmic Visions 2015{2025 (Helmich and Ivison, 2009). IRASSI presents also an extension to previous studies since it actively addresses questions of navigation, swarm dynamics and internal calibration. The central ideas of such a facility are: swarm operation in a Halo orbit around Lagrange point L2 freely drifting satellite elements to sample the (u,v) plane satellite distances do not have to be controlled but just accurately mea- sured and communicated to the correlator inter-satellite metrology via laser-based optical frequency combs employing heterodyne interferometry, detecting electromagnetic waves with amplitude and phase information 7 Parameter Required Value Number of telescopes 5 Number of immediate baselines 10 Size of telescope mirrors 3.5 m (primary mirror) Spacecraft con guration Free- ying in 3D, changed by initiated passive drifts Length range of projected baselines 7-10 m (min) to 850 m (max) Essential wavelength range 50 to 300 m Essential frequency range 1 to 6 THz Frequency bandwidth 2 GHz (min. requirement); 16 GHz dual polarisation (goal) Velocity resolution <1 km/s 00 00 Useful Field of view 3 to 18 (frequency-dependent) Angular resolution 0.1 (at 300 m) 00 00 Telescope pointing accuracy 0.4 (requirement), 0.2 (goal) Accuracy of baseline metrology < 5 m (3D) Temperatures  80 K (main dish, passive cooling); 4 K (mixer, active cooling) Table 1: Basic parameters for the IRASSI concept of a FIR space interferometer. Table 1 summarises the main requirements for several of the key parameters of IRASSI. In the following, we will elaborate on the motivation and reasoning for some of the choices we have made. 3.1. Number of telescopes Several considerations of di erent nature in uence this decision. On the one hand, more telescopes o er more immediate coverage of the (u,v) plane and of the related spatial frequencies. For a number of N interferometer el- ements, there are N (N-1) / 2 immediate baselines, hence, with increasing number of elements, the number of baselines increases faster than linearly. However, with more and more interferometer elements, the complexity of the mission rises drastically. The choice of the telescope number of course a ects most sub-systems, from the demands on the total data transfer between all the elements up to the complexity of the laser metrology system. As another boundary condition, one also has to keep in mind, that only a few interferom- eter elements might be put into space simultaneously with one launch. We 8 Figure 2: A sketch of the principle design for an IRASSI satellite element. Taken from Ferrer-Gil et al. (2016). The drawing is roughly to scale. The ranging system consists of four laser portals for inter-satellite metrology and data transfer and is on the cold side of the sun and heat shields. Among all the attitude sensors, just the star tracker cameras are explicitly visible here, while gyroscopes will be mounted in the interior of the satellites. had done the simulations for launch and transfer to L2 assuming one Ariane 5ECA launch for 5 satellite elements which seems feasible (Buinhas et al., 2016). Certainly, a launcher like the \Falcon Heavy" would be an even more powerful alternative. After the update on the parameters for the Ariane 6-64 in March 2018 , one has to check if also this launcher would be capable to master this task. One can start from a di erent point of view and ask which number of telescopes is essential to achieve certain goals and to recover im- portant quantities. In principle, even with two telescopes (and a meticulously One has to mention that the Ariane 5 model series is due to be discontinued in the future, after the JWST launch. Lagier, R., et al., "ARIANE6", User's Manual, Issue 1, Rev. 0 (March 2018), http://www.arianespace.com/wpcontent/uploads/2018/04/Mua-6 Issue-1 Revision- 0 March-2018.pdf . 9 planned observing strategy) it might be possible to cover considerable parts of the (u,v) plane. However, with two telescopes it is not possible to recover the so-called closure quantities (Thompson et al., 2001) which provide inter- ferometric information that is not a ected by certain measurement errors. Closure Phases: In order to assess this quantity, at least three immediate baselines (and thus three telescopes) are necessary. Though the information is now reduced from three Fourier phases to one closure phase quantity, it is not a ected by additive phase errors anymore. In general, for N interferome- ter elements, (N-1) (N-2) / 2 independent closure phases can be constructed (Thompson et al., 2001, p. 400). Closure phases give important constraints on the geometry of the intensity distribution to be reconstructed. While un- resolved point sources result in closure phases of 0 or 180 , any deviation from these values indicates a deviation from point-symmetry for the intensity distribution (Monnier, 2007). Closure Amplitudes: The closure amplitude is an independent quantity cal- culated for a combination of four stations. For this quantity, amplitude errors cancel out similar to the individual phase errors in the closure phase. The clo- sure amplitude is thus independent of all station-dependent amplitude errors, such as pointing errors or dish deformation. It can be used to compensate for detector gain uctuations and changing antenna eciencies. It does not eliminate baseline-dependent errors, though. For a set of N interferometer elements, there are [N (N-3)] / 2 independent closure amplitudes (Thompson et al., 2001, p. 401). For an unresolved point source, the closure amplitudes should be unity. While closure phases have been used already for a long while in both radio and infrared interferometry, closure amplitudes are not so well known yet, although they are used implicitly in radio interferometry data models. One example where closure amplitudes have been used explicitly is the work of Doeleman et al. (2001) on VLBI observations of the Galactic cen- ter at 86 GHz. Taking all this into account we opt for a ve-element design as a baseline requirement for IRASSI. It allows to retrieve precious closure phase and closure amplitude information. Even if one of the ve elements is compromised, still a reduced number of closure quantities can be recovered. With ve interferometric elements there are: 10 immediate baselines = 10 immediate Fourier phases and amplitudes, 6 independent closure phases, and 5 independent closure amplitudes. 10 3.2. Baseline lengths { Baseline accuracy One of the basic goals of an interferometer like IRASSI would be to deliver sub-arcsecond spatial resolution over the whole FIR frequency range, from 1 to 6 THz. We set as a requirement for IRASSI to achieve 0.1 arcsec angular resolution even at the lowest frequency of 1 THz =b 300m. In order to es- timate the maximum baseline lengths necessary in order to deliver such an angular resolution value, we start with a simple estimate. Assuming that the (u,v)-plane is suciently lled, the uniformly weighted sampling function out to a maximum circle (u,v)-radius of r = = u (with r as the maxi- max max max mum baseline and  as the wavelength) will give rise to a synthesised beam in form of a Bsinc function whose FWHM = 0:705 u (Thompson et al., 2001, max p.389). To achieve FWHM=0.1 arcsec at 300 m calls for baseline lengths up to  425 m according to this relation. Uniform weighting delivers the best spatial resolution, but comes with a relatively high sidelobe level. There will be many situations where a trade-o has to be made between spatial reso- lution and noise performance and, consequently, when natural weighting or certain kinds of (u,v)-tapering will be necessary in post-processing. In order to ensure also in such situations the 0.1-arcsec resolution, we introduce a factor of 2 for the maximum baselines. Hence, IRASSI shall be operational out to maximum baseline lengths of around 850 m as a rm requirement. Regarding the necessary baseline length accuracy, we mention again that we do not need to control these distances. We just need to accurately measure them in order to inform the correlator about the geometric delays to be taken into account. Observations at the shortest wavelengths naturally have the highest demands. A minimum requirement is that the knowledge about the baseline lengths should be better than  =10 in order not to accumulate too min large phase uncertainties. Hence, the baseline length measurement accuracy (in 3D) should be better than 5 m for IRASSI where  = 50m. In such min a setting, we then have to deal with phase uncertainties of several tens of degrees (for the shortest operational wavelengths of IRASSI), as it commonly occurs in real ground-based interferometry at elevated frequencies due to at- mospheric decorrelation e ects. We enter a di erent level of requirements, though, if we demand that baselines are to be calibrated (instantaneously in our case) in the same sense as interferometer element distances are being calibrated on ground. There, by applying calibrator measurement series on unresolved reference sources, one can attempt to push the uncertainties of the baseline lengths down to /360, hence approaching phase uncertainties as small as 1 for these reference phases (Thompson et al., 2001, p. 93). This 11 would put much more stringent requirements for the metrology systems. We will brie y come back to this issue in Section 5.3. 3.3. Telescope diameter { Pointing accuracy In subsection 5.5 we recapitulate how the main re ector size of the individ- ual satellite elements is related to the nal sensitivity of the interferometer; in particular, that a scale-down of the diameter would have to be compen- sated by a disproportionate increase of the number of antennas. Therefore, for the IRASSI study, we consider a small swarm with large but still practical telescope diameters. We assume that the main re ector dishes of the inter- ferometer elements have a diameter of 3.5 m. This choice is of course closely based on the FIR/sub-mm satellite Herschel (Pilbratt et al., 2010) which featured the same telescope diameter. Such mirrors still t into the fairings of currently available large rocket launchers. The relatively large size results in ample collecting area per IRASSI element. This is a crucial prerequisite to conduct sensitive spectral line studies (cf. subsection 5.5), which is of course the main working area for an interferometer like IRASSI. The choice of the mirror size has implications for instance for the neces- sary pointing accuracy of the individual antenna elements. Keep in mind that for a uniformly illuminated antenna with circular aperture of radius r the resulting power pattern (the \primary beam") has a half-power beam width HPBW = 0:514/r and a rst null at 0:610/r (Thompson et al., 2001, p.389). (A realistic choice for such antennas will deviate from uniform illumination in order to lower the sidelobe levels and to avoid standing-wave issues, e.g., by introducing o set or o -axis designs.) Nevertheless, the anks of the power pattern for most designs are usually quite steep. It is obvious that antenna pointing errors (especially the relative pointing error RPE, see below) will (temporarily) displace the maximum of the reception pattern from the observing direction (i.e., the phase centre). Our demands on the pointing accuracy will depend on the short end of the wavelength operational range of IRASSI. With  = 50 m, the HPBW is 3 arcsec for a uniformly min illuminated circular antenna. Modi ed designs for the main and secondary mirrors will slightly widen the main lobe by approximately a factor of 1.1{ 1.4. Assuming a factor of 1.33 compared to the uniform illumination HPBW, we set the minimum requirement for the pointing accuracy to HPBW (50 m)/10 = 0.4 arcsec. However, in order to ensure high-quality interferomet- ric data, it is suggested to pursue even higher accuracies. Napier (1999), for instance, advocates a pointing accuracy of HPBW/20. With this perfor- 12 mance, a source located in the centre of the antenna beam will su er only negligible intensity variations since the reception pattern at HPBW/20 is still around 0.995. The fractional intensity variation for a source located at the half power point of the pattern, however, will already be  0:87, even if the strict limit of HPBW/20 is enforced for the pointing accuracy. One can see that the accuracy of the outer part of the image will be noticeably reduced. Therefore, HPBW (50 m)/20 = 0.2 arcsec is a very desirable goal for the IRASSI pointing accuracy. This goal is desirable for both, absolute and rela- tive pointing errors. Compared to the values achieved with the HERSCHEL satellite of 0.9 arcsec (see Sect. 5.4.1), this calls for a clear improvement of a factor 3{4, but is not unrealistic (cf. Sect. 5.4.1). 4. Technical progress on several fronts 4.1. Data rates and necessity for on-board correlation A principle question is how much raw data are being produced, and whether this amount can be downlinked to Earth for a posteriori correla- tion. The raw data rates can be approximated with this formula (cf. Rajan et al., 2016): D = 2N N N [bit=s] (1) obs pol bits sat For IRASSI, N = 5. Let us assume that just two distinct polarisation sat products will be evaluated (N = 2) and not the full four Stokes parame- pol ters. Let us further assume a bit-rounding level for the sampler/digitiser of N = 2. Regarding the spectral bandwidth  [in Hz] to be covered, we bits have to keep in mind the boundary condition that IRASSI should operate at high frequencies up to 6 THz. To cover a moderate velocity range of 50 km/s around a spectral line, already 2 GHz of bandwidth are necessary at this highest frequency. If IRASSI will operate in a communication mode similar to the Herschel satellite, we could assume 20 hours of autonomous operation (see also Sect. 5.1), and a maximum window of 4 hours of data transfer per operational day. With the chosen parameters, IRASSI will pro- duce an amount of raw data of 5.76e+15 bits every 20 hours. To put this into perspective, we have to compare it to the data that could realistically be downlinked within the communication window. We give two examples. (1) The EUCLID satellite (to be operated in L2, launch 2021) will employ a new K-band (26 GHz) radio telemetry system for the main data transfer. This will enable to downlink the total amount of 850 Gbit of (compressed) 13 data per operational day within a 4-hour communication window, whereby the maximum downlink rate is 74 Mbit/s (Laureijs et al., 2014). The se- vere mismatch between the 8.5e+11 bit/day for EUCLID and the 5.76e+15 bit/day for IRASSI is obvious. (2) Looking more into the future, studies have been undertaken to estimate the data transfer rate using laser links directly to Earth, employing the large telescopes of modern Cherenkov telescope arrays as collecting bowls (Carrasco-Casado et al., 2015). This work estimates e ective data rates of around 700 Mbit/s from an L2-orbit to Earth using this method. The possible amount of data to be transferred within a 4-hours communication window is then 1.01e+13 bit/day. One can conclude that such techniques are not sucient to enable a downlink of the IRASSI raw data to Earth. Even if continuous data downlink capabilities, operating simultaneously to the actual interferometric measurements, could be implemented, and raw data compression factors of 10 could be achieved, it would still take almost 9.5 days to downlink the raw data of one day. (This is just the exercise for the minimum bandwidth of 2 GHz. Remember that there is the ambition to correlate larger bandwidths of 8 or even 16 GHz.) As a consistency check, we also evaluate the data rates after correlation (cf. Rajan et al., 2016): D = 2(N N ) N N =T [bit=s] (2) cor pol sat bits bins For producing these data, one should employ a higher-quality digitisation, e.g., N = 16. With N = 1024 spectral bins, and with a typical cor- bits bins relator averaging time of T=1 s, we arrive at a data rate of 3.28 Mbit/s. Integrated over 20 hours of operation, this amounts to 2.36e+11 bits, which can easily be downlinked within 3200 s when the 74 Mbit/s download rate of a EUCLID-like system is available. A more detailed calculation for the download budget for IRASSI, including realistic parameters for the transmis- sion system (transmitter antenna eciency, transmission path, atmospheric attenuation, etc.) can be found in our related publication (Ferrer-Gil et al., 2016). 4.2. Distributed correlator { power consumption Similar to the ESPRIT study, we therefore also adopt the principle idea of on-board correlation. Such concepts have been discussed for a while now for potential very-low-frequency radio interferometers in space, both with a central correlator unit (e.g., Oberoi and Pin con, 2005) or with a distributed 14 correlator (e.g., Rajan et al., 2016). For IRASSI, we prefer a setup with a frequency-distributed correlator where all ve satellite elements act in a symmetric fashion, and each instance of the distributed correlator correlates 1/5th of the entire spectral bandwidth. Such a symmetric con guration avoids the single-point failure of one central correlator. Even in case one of the ve correlator elements is compromised, still 80% of the full bandwidth could thus be evaluated. The numbers for the raw data rates elaborated on in the previous subsection have also implications for the inter-satellite data communication for such a distributed correlator concept. In the 2-GHz- minimum-bandwidth example, every satellite produces 1.15e+15 bits of raw data per 20 hours. 4/5 of that have to be transmitted to the other 4 satel- lite elements. Hence, every satellite also receives 4/5th of that one-satellite budget = 0.92e+15 bits within 20 hours (i.e., data volume for transmission = data volume for reception). This in turn means that a data exchange rate of 12.8 Gbit/s has to be achieved per satellite. Wider spectral bandwidths of 8 or 16 GHz will push these demands even higher. This calls for a laser data communication system. We currently discuss whether the metrology laser system can be co-used for this purpose. We conceive that the correlation is to be done in quasi-real time. Storage space for the huge amount of raw data would ll up quickly. Hence, the capacity for bu ering raw data would be perhaps just in the order of minutes. (For the above example of 2 GHz bandwidth, every satellite will produce 120 Giga-Byte per minute.) We have not estimated yet the speed of correlation, but expect that also to be fol- lowing real-time. Note that the correlation period can be extended into the communication time window which is several hours long. The necessity to correlate such large amounts of raw data raises the question about the power consumption of the correlator modules. Fortunately, technological develop- ments in recent years have been quite promising. The previous generation of GPU- or FPGA-based correlator modules still showed relatively high gures- of-merit for the energy per complex multiply-accumulate (CMAC) operation (typically around 1.0e-9 Joule). A new generation of application-speci c in- tegrated circuits (ASICs) based on CMOS technology promises much more energy-ecient computing. In the recent study by D'Addario and Wang (2016) such modules are introduced which (for an optimal combination of telescope numbers and bandwidth) can reach 1.8e-12 Joule per CMAC oper- ation for the actual cross-correlation. Even when taking into account further energy demands of such components on a system level, the authors estimate that the total gure-of-merit is still below 1.0e-11 Joule, hence showing a 15 factor of 100 improvement compared to the previous generation of correlator modules. One such ASIC device dissipates 1.824 W (for the actual CMAC operations), and shows a power consumption on the system level (including board-level I/O, power supplies, and controls) on the order of 5 W. One has to admit that the design presented there is optimised for large telescope numbers ( 128) and small bandwidth (a few MHz) per module. But these two parameters work in a kind of trade-o . Given the small number of tele- scopes for IRASSI, such a module could correlate already a bandwidth of several GHz, sucient for the correlator setup per satellite in our frequency- distributed correlator frame work. 4.3. Mixer performance at THz frequencies Much progress has been achieved regarding the technology that enables the rst steps in the detection chain for Tera-Hertz heterodyne observations., i.e., receivers, local oscillators and mixers. Since the ESPRIT study (Wild et al., 2008) we have seen the successful operation of the HIFI instrument (up to 1.9 THz) onboard of the Herschel Space Observatory between 2009-2013, and the ongoing operation of the GREAT/upGREAT instrument (up to 4.7 THz) associated with the SOFIA airborne observatory. A common theme for development in recent years is the combination of Hot Electron Bolome- ter (HEB) mixers (e.g., Shurakov et al., 2016) and Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL) as local oscillators for the heterodyning (e.g., Hub  ers et al., 2013; Vitiello et al., 2015). One important quantity to compare the performance of heterodyne systems to is the quantum noise limit (TQL = h  / k  48 K/THz for single-sideband operation). A gure-of-merit often invoked is 10 TQL, an important border that has to be vanquished in order to stay competitive with incoherent detector systems. More and more experimental THz receiver setups including HEB mixers reach or even transcend this bor- der (e.g., Kloosterman et al., 2013). Currently, values down to 5  TQL have been achieved (Krause et al., 2018). A recommendation in the FIR Roadmap prepared for ESA (Rigopoulou et al., 2017) is to aim for a performance bet- ter than 3  TQL, in order to achieve many of the ambitious science goals collected in that document. Given the current rate of improvements, such a performance will be in reach in the next decade. We note again, that the part of the signal chain will need active cooling to suppress thermal noise in these sensitive devices. New superconducting materials are being tested for inclusion in the HEB mixers. For instance, MgB2 promises a good com- bination of low noise, wide noise bandwidth, and the possibility to operate 16 such mixers at slightly elevated temperatures beyond 5-20 K (Novoselov and Cherednichenko, 2017). On the other hand, new setups promise to place the mixer and heterodyne in the same cryostat (Seliverstov et al., 2017), which will be bene cial for further miniaturisation of such structural components. 5. Focus points of our study: Navigation, system architecture, baseline metrology, attitude estimation, sensitivity IRASSI is undoubtedly a complex and ambitious mission concept. The focus of our own work in the IRASSI team, besides the advancement of accurate metrology via laser frequency combs, is on navigational aspects of such a mission, and to devise a realistic view on the system architecture of such satellites. We give here just short summaries of our work and refer to our original publications for detailed descriptions. 5.1. Formation ying, relative dynamics, and modes of operation A full simulation has been performed in Buinhas et al. (2016) for the launch and transfer of the 5-satellite swarm to the Lagrange point L2, where the satellites are to be injected into a Halo orbit, using the General Mis- sion Analysis Tool (GMAT). Furthermore, a Delta-v budget for necessary accelerations over the mission timeline has been estimated, which includes contributions for the initial transfer to L2, station keeping (to remain in a quasi-Halo orbit around L2), and for routine operations (formation recon gu- ration, baseline change initiation, ne target acquisition). The total number is estimated to be around 300 m/s per spacecraft (Buinhas et al., 2017). This has implications of course for the choice of the propulsion systems, whereby di erent requirements are valid for di erent tasks. Especially the more frequent tasks requiring high control precision take more than 80% of this budget. Di erent technologies have been identi ed which can provide the thrust level required by IRASSI for such tasks. These include pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), eld emission electrostatic propulsion (FEEP), col- loidal thrusters, and cold gas thrusters. PPTs might have issues since pulsed operations may introduce disturbances; this needs further investigation. Cold gas thrusters are probably discarded since they require a large amount of fuel. Due to the experimental nature of FEEPs, currently colloidal thrusters seem to be the prime candidates for a secondary propulsion system. The ( ne) target acquisition at the beginning of a measurement can call for a quite extended time span of around one hour or more, especially if one decides to 17 do this via micro thrusters and not via reaction wheels. This includes time for internal pre-calibration, laser re-acquisition, and time to allow exible motions to subside after recon guration and re-pointing. The distance to the Sun-Earth L2 location is such that realtime commu- nications and availability are limited and that the spacecraft ought to be embedded with a high degree of autonomy to maneuver during the opera- tional phase throughout the mission, as well as for carrying out vital house- keeping tasks, such as avoiding collisions. We encounter several challenges: a stringent position accuracy requirement, the real-time capability of the positioning algorithm and the deviation of the measured satellite distances between some ranging system and the desired distance between the tele- scope reference points. In Frankl et al. (2017), we approach these challenges by developing and testing two autonomous relative positioning algorithms, based on a geometric snapshot approach. The goal of these algorithms is to determine the coordinates of the telescope reference positions, treating the full 3D uncertainties of the reference points. One promising algorithm transforms the distance measurements between the ranging systems to the telescope reference positions using attitude and angular measurements, while subsequently an optimisation problem is formulated taking into account only the transferred distance measurements. Follow-up work in this regard has been presented by us in Philips-Blum et al. (2018). The results of this pa- per show that the required baseline accuracy between the satellites of 5 m cannot easily be achieved by the basic snapshot method with the currently assumed measurement accuracies of around 1 m. The geometric snapshot method is time-consuming in that it requires several iterations to achieve convergence. Thus, a lter-based approach will be considered in the future. Since lter-based approaches incorporate a process model, the in uence of acceleration forces on each satellite was investigated. It could be shown that the in uence is major such that di erent accelerations need to be taken into account for any satellite in general. In future work, a lter-based approach considering such accelerations will be investigated. We also simulated realistic scenarios for the swarm con gurations (Buinhas et al., 2018). We found that if arranged in a strictly planar con guration, the relative positioning determination procedure is hampered. We therefore treat the general case of non-coplanar geometries, where the satellites are staggered in 3D in a kind of pyramid con guration (see Fig. 3). Here, the (x,y,z) coor- dinates are assumed to be at the initial formation locations (0,0,0), (0,a,0), (0,0,-2a),(a/4,a/2,-a), and (-a/4,a/3,-2/3 a), and subsequently drift motions 18 Figure 3: Sketch of the nominal formation geometry (adapted from Buinhas et al., 2018). In this general case, the formation will not be co-planar, but in a true 3D con guration (see text). are initiated and followed by the dynamics computation. For these simula- tions, we take the concrete geometry of the satellite, including the size of the sun-shield, and the location of the laser metrology terminals into account for predicting the sky coverage, and the location of exclusion regions. The latter occur due to at least two instances: (1) the fact that the sun-shield creates an exclusion cone for the laser beams when looking \down" along its own host satellite. When no laser metrology is possible to one of the other satellites such a setup has to be avoided, since in such a case the correlation of the science data would be compromised. (2) Furthermore, when satellites come close, shadowing of one satellite by another has to be avoided, obviously, to not block the FIR science signal from reaching the receiver. The resulting e ects are depicted in Fig. 4. The blue regions show the immediate sky cov- erage for a speci c epoch. As the IRASSI swarm revolves around the Sun within one year, basically the whole sky can be covered eventually. But for a concrete epoch, targets located in the exclusion regions have to be avoided. 19 Figure 4: Instantaneous sky coverage (blue) and exclusion regions (red) for two sizes of the initial satellite con guration (see text above, and Fig. 3). Left: The small con guration scenario, where the length parameter a = 40 m. Right: The large con guration scenario, where the length parameter a = 400 m. A suitable target allocation strategy must therefore ensure that the physical disposition of the formation does not inhibit the observations throughout the entire observations period. An important capability of IRASSI will be to probe a variety of spatial frequencies, and to eventually probe compact emission with resolution ele- ments of < 0.1 arcsec in the far-infrared. IRASSI shall be able to integrate and take interferometric data while gradually changing the baselines. The above mentioned case of 20-hour drifts are for such applications for which the combination of good (u,v) coverage and high sensitivity is mandatory, for instance when a high- delity image reconstruction is being attempted for weak line sources. In principle, other modes of operation are possible. Larger surveys of moderately bright sources could utilise a strategy where the swarm is kept in one con guration without relative drifts, observing several possi- ble targets in a row, and changing to di erent distinct con gurations and repeating the observational series consecutively. The (u,v) coverage will be more sparse, but may still allow an image reconstruction. Then, of course, the data acquisition is spread over many operational days. This implies that the nal data post processing on ground can just start when all data have been gathered, and the scheduling for such series should be done in a way that all the necessary con gurations can be met before some targets leave their visibility patch for several weeks or even months. Finally, for strong sources, also a snapshot mode can be envisioned where important informa- tion can already be obtained from relatively short observations on the order of one or a few hours in one con guration. A full image reconstruction may 20 not be possible. But crucial interferometric parameters like closure phases (see Sect. 3.1) or di erential phases can already tell a lot about the geometry and symmetry of the emission regions which then can be compared to mod- els. The latter two modes have been employed in the previous generation of ground-based infrared interferometers like MIDI or AMBER at the VLTI. We are actively working on such issues of operational modes. For the drift mode, we started by just considering passive drifts where the pathways in the (u,v) plane approach straight lines. This results in peculiar shapes for the syn- thesized beam and calls for attention when applying the common inversion and deconvolution techniques like CLEAN. We think that the application of di erent approaches for such tasks has to be studied, for instance by invok- ing sparse-sampling algorithms, as has been done already for radio data with LOFAR (Garsden et al., 2015). Too symmetric drift con gurations (in terms of relative angles of the satellite paths) and too similar drift velocities will lead to degeneracies in the (u,v) plane coverage. To better ll the (u,v) plane, the application of acceleration maneuvers during a measurement campaign is necessary, which of course has an impact on the formation dynamics, on the operations as well as on the fuel budget. We plan to address these issues for all the three cases mentioned above in a future publication (Buinhas et al., in prep.). 5.2. System architecture and stability requirements Based on the main requirements of the mission and the related stabil- ity requirements, a preliminary spacecraft design has been developed (see Fig. 2), including a description of the main subsystems of the spacecraft (Ferrer-Gil et al., 2016). Included are rst estimates of the mass distribution and the power consumption budget of the di erent subsystems (mechanical & thermal, payload, attitude and orbit control, propulsion, communication, command and data handling, power). We estimate that total power of  1780 W will be needed per satellite element, including a 20% margin. Assuming current technology of multi-junction GaAs-based solar cells, it is estimated that they will be able to generate 251 W/m at the Lagrange point L2 at the end of their life. We conclude that 8.4 m of solar cells will be required at each spacecraft to provide the required power, which is somewhat smaller than the solar panel area for the Herschel satellite ( 12 m ). The heaviest single parts within the satellite will be the primary mirror ( 231 kg) and an optical bench ( 236 kg). The presented spacecraft design has been used to assess the e ect of environmental thermal uctuations on the stability of 21 the spacecraft. The major components, except the service module, will be subject to the passive cooling by the heat shields. For the receiver/mixer components in the signal chain we will need active cooling to reach the very low temperatures of down to 4 K. Hence, these components have to be en- capsulated in a cryostat. Sorption coolers could be a choice since they do not introduce excessive vibrations into the satellite system. We nd that the primary mirror can introduce relatively high distortions in the critical parts of the spacecraft. This is of course due to its quite large diameter of 3.5 m, so that the mirror thermally in uences its surrounding elements, including the optical bench. Based on these results it is recommended to investigate techniques to thermally isolate the primary mirror in order to reduce its in- uence to the dimensional stability of the spacecraft. This could be achieved by a proper mounting and protecting the primary mirror with a bae. The optical bench probably has to be based on low-expansion-index materials like Zerodur or Silicon Carbide. It has to be further investigated whether such design features can ensure that the path between the laser metrology termi- nals and the science instruments remains under control. It may be necessary to consider an internal metrology setup to calibrate these internal pathways. Important conceptual work in that regard had already been done in the con- text of preparing for the interferometric astrometry mission SIM (cf. Dekens et al., 2004). Careful alignment and thermal monitoring is of course a major point in the design of all space-borne astronomical satellites (see e.g., Bos et al., 2012, for the James Webb Space Telescope). Another important con- clusion is that attitude changes can produce higher dimensional distortions than solar ux changes due to the more gradual Sun distance changes. This suggests that observations of the infrared sources should be scheduled trying to minimize the necessary orientation change of the telescope in order to min- imize the introduced distortions. Adequate procedures should be developed to monitor and calibrate these e ects (Ferrer-Gil et al., 2016). 5.3. Precise Metrology { Optical Frequency Combs One advantage of a heterodyne system compared to direct detection infer- ometers is that precise distances between the satellite elements do not have to be controlled during the measurements. One needs, however, a versatile inter-satellite metrology system in order to measure the distances contin- uously with high time cadence. This is especially true for our particular concept of freely drifting satellite elements, for which relative motions in the order of cm/s are envisioned. We propose to employ optical frequency combs 22 Figure 5: Performance of the experimental two-combs setup for distance metrology. The upper curve is for time-of- ight (TOF) measurements and the lower curve represents the interferometric measurement. The interferometric measurement becomes unambiguous when the TOF measurement becomes < =2, i.e., at around 10 ms. for such a metrology task. For such a comb, which is generated by periodic pulses of a femto-second laser, all resulting optical-frequency teeth have the same frequency o set to their immediate neighbours. This frequency spacing is given by the pulse repetition rate f of the laser. Typical values for f lie at r r 10 MHz up to 10 GHz. The comb is shifted with respect to zero by the o set frequency f . All mode frequencies of the optical frequency comb can be transformed into radio frequencies (RF) by the comb equation f = n f +f n r 0 and hence can be heterodyne transformed and processed using established RF electronics. Menlo Systems has carefully evaluated several methods how a laser frequency comb can be used for precision distance ranging. For the purpose of IRASSI, we nd that double-comb interferometry (Coddington et al., 2009) o ers great perspectives. For such a method, a pair of two combs, having pulse trains of slightly di erent repetition periods (T and T T ), are being used. One comb sends out the metrology signal that r r is re ected at the distant satellite and returns back where it is heterodyne- 23 combined with the second comb that serves as a local oscillator, providing shotnoise-limited performance. The concept enables us to achieve high mea- surement sampling that is governed by the ratio T =T . Our IRASSI system allows a real-time reduction of the data with a high duty cycle of up to 50 kHz. A customised digitiser with FPGA unit is used for data acquisition and real-time evaluation, programmed by specialists at Menlo Systems. In Fig. 5, we show a result from our lab measurements. Di erent approaches have been tested, whereby the combs were locked onto RF and onto optical references. Signi cantly better results have been achieved with the optical lock, providing accuracies down to 10 m within 10 ms. An additional ad- vantage of the optical lock compared to RF lock is, that it can be compared and calibrated to an atomic transition. We may come back to the question raised in Section 3.2 concerning whether also higher precision can be reached to calibrate the baseline lengths (in realtime) as is done for the antenna positions on ground for ground-based interferometers (using dedicated cali- bration runs in the latter case). We think that this is possible as shown by the lower measurement curve in Fig. 5. After 10 ms of averaging time, this particular setup resulted in around 0.01 m accuracy. This would push the phase uncertainty of the incoming wavefronts due to baseline uncertainties to < 0:1 even for our shortest wavelength of 50 m. Currently, the lab setup is contained in a larger electronics rack. However, for the ongoing second study phase, we plan to come up with a miniaturised bread-board design. For sounding rocket projects, Menlo Systems has developed devices where the optical unit is around 1 litre in volume, and consumes less than 50 W, already ful lling many of the requirements for a satellite application. This design will be adapted for the dual-comb ranging. We envision to have the actual frequency comb units close to the service module, where the power can be dissipated under controled conditions. The laser signals will be conducted to the terminals of the ranging system via bers. The direction along which the terminals are mounted is not xed and they are vectorizable within 90 both in azimuth and elevation (relative to the optical bench frame). Further- more, because only a small spectral section of the comb with a bandwidth of less than 1 nm is actually used for each baseline, one double comb per satel- lite is sucient to support all 4 optical links to its satellite neighbors. The baseline links between the satellites will also be bi-directional, and can ad- ditionally be used for fast data transfer and exchange between the satellites. All frequency combs will be coherently locked to the same optical master reference, which will also be distributed via the optical links. Because the 24 satellites are drifting the optical reference has to be Doppler-compensated for each satellite. 5.4. Studies on Attitude Estimation and Control 5.4.1. High Accuracy \Attitude Determination/Estimation and Control Sys- tem (ADCS)" Spacecraft System Accuracy achieved [arcsec] Total accuracy required Attitude estimation 0.03 (best-case), 0.1 (worst) 0.4 Attitude control 0.02 (best-case) Table 2: IRASSI spacecraft pointing accuracies achieved by attitude estimation and control systems. For the Herschel FIR satellite, the pointing performance, both in APE and RPE , could be brought to an rms of 0.9 arcsec (S anchez-Portal et al., 2014). This was eventually achieved with a robust concept of commercial optical CCD star trackers in combination with a gyro system, after some ini- tial problems had been understood and resolved as the active mission went along. Considering our goal of 0.2 arcsec for the IRASSI antennas, this shows, that it will not be sucient to just replicate the Herschel attitude estimation and control concept for the IRASSI antennas. Therefore, the IRASSI study covers active research on attitude determination/estimation and related control systems. Figure 6 shows the components of IRASSI's high accuracy \Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS)" which are Attitude Estimation System (AES) and Attitude Control System (ACS) that were designed and developed, and according to our simulations achieve unprecedented stringent attitude estimation and control (best-case) accura- cies of 0.03 and 0.02 arcsec respectively (cf. Table 2). As shown in Fig. 7, the total pointing accuracy/error can be separated into two parts, i.e. pointing accuracy from AES and ACS systems known as Measurement Error (ME) and Control Error (CE), respectively. This leads to (theoretically) achieving the imposed total pointing accuracy requirement of 0.4 arcsec (with the goal The absolute pointing error (APE) is de ned as the angular separation between the desired pointing direction and the instantaneous actual pointing direction. The relative pointing error (RPE) is the angular separation between the instantaneous pointing direction and the short-time average (e.g., 60 s) pointing direction at a given time period. 25 Figure 6: IRASSI's High Accuracy Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS). of 0.2 arcsec) on the IRASSI spacecrafts. This also leaves enough margin for pointing errors due to other space sub-systems like IRASSI reaction wheels (required for attitude slews and part of ongoing IRASSI work), thruster ring (used for IRASSI formation control), cryogenic coolers, propellant sloshing and other structural instabilities, to name a few. 5.4.2. Attitude Estimation System (AES) High Accuracy attitude estimation accuracy of 0.03 arcsec is accomplished by AES which involves carefully selected high accuracy commercial-o -the shelf sensors and implementing a state-of- the-art optimal attitude estimation algorithm for sensor data fusion in Matlab. Table 3 shows the sensor-suite selected for high accuracy AES. During the ne-pointing/scienti c observa- tion mission mode of IRASSI, data from a star tracker (single or multiple) is fused with data from a gyroscope assembly (where each assembly con- sists of 4-gyro heads mounted in an octahedral tetrad con guration) via a Multiplicative Extended Kalman Filter (MEKF). For coarse attitude acqui- 26 Figure 7: Attitude de nitions: Pointing Error (PE), Measurement Error (ME) and Control Error (CE). Table 3: Sensor Suite for High accuracy Attitude Estimation System. sition mode, measurements from a Sun Sensor and Gyroscopes are fused via MEKF. Three ltering schemes are developed for ne-pointing mode (as shown in Fig. 8 and Table 5) where a 3-axis gyroscope is fused with single and two simultaneously operating (oriented in orthogonal directions) star trackers in Centralized and Decentralized Schemes. Table 4 lists the attitude accuracies achieved by simulations (as shown in Fig. 9) of these above men- tioned schemes, all of which utilize an analytic lter algorithm named MEKF as explained above. IRASSI is the rst mission that makes the information on fusion of two simultaneously operating star trackers for attitude estima- tion public, even though this idea is also used for the BepiColombo mission to Mercury. This study also led to the placement (position and orientation) 27 Figure 8: Centralized (upper) and de-centralised (lower) ltering schemes. Estimation (Sensor Fusion) Cases Accuracy achieved 1 STR and Gyro fusion 0.03 arcsec (1) Centralized case 0.03 arcsec (1) Decentralized case 0.03 arcsec (1) Table 4: Pointing accuracy results for Centralized and Decentralized cases of the IRASSI sensors onboard IRASSI spacecraft. This is also indicated in Fig. 2. More details can be found in Bhatia et al. (2017). 5.4.3. High Accuracy Attitude Control System (ACS) Feasibility check of three attitude control algorithms, namely Sliding Mode control (SMC), Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and Proportional- Derivative (PD) control led to an achievement of 0.02 arcsec for small-angle rest-to-rest maneuvers. The high accuracy pointing requirement that IRASSI imposes on the ADCS is for \small angle maneuvers" because once the sci- ence observations start, i.e., once the spacecraft points to a scienti c target, there will be only small deviations in the spacecraft attitude from this scien- ti c target. But since \large angle maneuvers" (that are required by many other telescopic and non-telescopic space missions) are the most dicult atti- 28 Figure 9: The attitude accuracy (in arcsec) found in our simulations for a 22-hour interval for three cases. Up: one star tracker and Gyro fusion; Middle: centralised case; Bottom: decentralised case. 29 IRASSI Mission Modes Attitude Estimation lters Corresponding Attitude Control Fine-pointing mode Gyro + 1 Star Tracker Sliding Mode Controller (SMC), Gyro + 2 Star Trackers Linear Quadratic (centralised) Regulator (LQR), Gyro + 2 Star Trackers Linear & nonlinear (de-centralised) PD controllers Coarse Attitude Gyro + coarse Sun sensor Acquisition Mode Table 5: IRASSI mission modes and the corresponding attitude lters and controllers. tude maneuvers to perform due to the nonlinearities of the system dynamics, properties of attitude parameters utilized, accumulation of disturbances and exposure to varying disturbances, we check the feasibility of these control algorithms in achieving tens-of-subarcsec accuracy for these maneuvers, too. Three disturbances that were fed-forward to the spacecraft nonlinear dy- namics, namely gravity-gradient torque, solar-radiation pressure torque and a constant torque (to account for unforeseen disturbances, shown in Fig. 6, left) are that encountered by IRASSI spacecraft in its halo-orbit at Sun-Earth L2. Stability analysis of these controllers showed their robustness regarding these disturbances as shown in Table 6. These controllers are \almost" globally stable. Quaternions which are chosen as the attitude parameters for ADCS, have an ambiguity when describing rotations within 360 degrees; both, a cer- tain quaternion and its inverse describe the same rotation within the Special Orthogonal, SO(3), space. Hence due to the ambiguity of quaternions within 360 degree, the stability of these controllers is relaxed to \almost" global asymptotic stability in the sense of Lyapunov where asymptotic stability is de ned over an \open" and dense set in SO(3). All three control algorithms are feasible for IRASSI's ne-pointing and coarse attitude-acquisition modes as shown in Table 5 and 6. These results are substantiated by simulations of these analytical control algorithms. More details about this study can be found in Bhatia, D. in prep. (\Final Report: IRASSI 2 Phase 1", to be published at Hanover University Library). In summary, 0.03 arcsec and 0.02 arcsec accuracies from attitude estima- tion and control systems, respectively, lead to a total of 0.05 arcsec pointing 30 Table 6: Performance Comparison of SMC, PD and LQR control design for IRASSI Space- craft attitude tracking rest-to-rest maneuvers. accuracy from ADCS (theoretically). Hence, we conclude that IRASSI's de- sired goal accuracy of 0.2 arcsec can be achieved, leaving sucient margins for other factors that a ect the pointing accuracies as discussed before. Cur- rently, we are investigating the reaction wheel assembly required for phys- ically rotating IRASSI spacecraft, speci cally during ne pointing mode. Also control allocation algorithms where the control torques calculated by the attitude control algorithms are distributed amongst the redundant reac- tion wheels to physically maneuver IRASSI telescope are under investigation, which will provide a realistic insight into the performance of the complete ACS. 5.5. Preliminary sensitivitiy estimates One future task will be to include many aspects of the IRASSI design in a comprehensive performance simulation. Here, we want to give just an order of magnitude estimate for the achievable sensitivity, to guide the reader what to expect from a facility like IRASSI. We will employ the standard sensitivity equation for radio interferometry. We use the following form: 2k T B sys = p (3) =4 D  N (N 1) N corr ap A A pol Tel 2 1 { noise in the correlated data, in W m Hz k { Boltzmann constant T { system temperature, in K sys { correlator eciency corr { aperture eciency ap D { single-dish telescope diameter; 3.5 m for IRASSI Tel 31 N { number of antennas; 5 for IRASSI N { number of polarisation products, 2 for IRASSI pol { frequency bandwidth, in Hz { on-source integration time, in s For simplicity, we assume here that T is dominated by the receiver/mixer sys noise temperatures. For  we adopt the value of 0.88, a number that is corr commonly invoked for correlators processing input stream data with 4-level 2-bit digitisation (e.g., D'Addario, 1989). For the aperture eciency  we ap have no rm values yet. Looking back to the Herschel satellite, its telescope (with the same 3.5 m diameter as anticipated for IRASSI) had an aperture eciency on the order of 0.6, as measured by HIFI calibration observations . We therefore adopt this value as a conservative preliminary estimate. We give two numbers as examples. In both cases we assume that a T on the sys order of three times the theoretical quantum limit (TQL  48 K/THz) can be achieved; admittedly a very ambitious goal, but in line with recommendations in Rigopoulou et al. (2017). One estimate is relevant for line measurements, e.g., at the frequency of the [CII] line at 1.9 THz. A 1 km/s channel at this frequency covers 6.333 MHz. After an integration time of 20 hours (the typical time for IRASSI to let the drifting satellites ll the (u,v) plane), the rms noise in such a channel would amount to 35 mJy. For a line with 3 km/s FWHM line width, and sampled with 1 km/s channels, this would be 20 2 equivalent to a 5- line ux of 3:5  10 W/m . The second computation is done for the frequency of 3 THz, corresponding to 100 m wavelength. Assuming that the receiver/backend system delivers a full bandwidth of 16 GHz in dual polarisation, after 20 hours of integration a continuum noise value of 1.1 mJy can be achieved. (This scales to 4.9 mJy for 1 hour of integration.) To give some perspective, we include here a simulation of a pre- transitional protoplanetary disk, originally published in Kraus et al. (2014). This is a result of a hydrodynamics simulation for the case when four Jupiter- mass proto-planets interact at di erent orbital radii with the disk material. The disk is inclined by 30 , the full eld-of-view is 80 au. The subsequent radiative transfer simulates the appearance at 100 micron. The result is shown in Fig. 10. We mark the locations of the four planets with circles the https://www.cosmos.esa.int/documents/12133/996743/The+HIFI+Beam+- +Release+No1+Release+Note+for+Astronomers 32 Figure 10: Radiative transfer simulation at a wavelength of 100 m on top of a hydro simulation of a transitional disk with four embedded proto-planets. Resolution elements for IRASSI at 100 m and 63.2 m (the wavelength of the strong [OI] ne-structure line) are indicated. The underlying simulation data have rst been shown in Kraus et al. (2014). size of an IRASSI resolution element at this wavelength. We emphasize that the outermost proto-planet concentration (the compact brightness peak 20 au from the central star) attains a ux density of around 23 mJy according to this simulation. Hence, at least regarding the sensitivities, such an object could be well detectable with IRASSI. Equation 3 makes it obvious that the telescope diameter D is an important Tel factor for the sensitivity, since it enters this formula with the squared power. 0:5 On the other hand, for larger numbers of telescope elements, [N (N 1)] A A approaches N , hence just a linear term. Thus, it is more dicult to gain sensitivity by adding more satellite elements. To achieve the same sensitivity as a ve-element interferometer with 3.5-m antennas, it would take nine satellites with 2.5 m diameter, for instance. 33 6. Summary and outlook We have shown the principle design of IRASSI, a free- ying FIR interfer- ometer with ve satellite elements at the Lagrange point L2, which shall cover an essential frequency range between 1{6 THz and shall deliver an angular resolution of better than 0.1 arcsec over the whole working range. Compared to other concepts employing direct detection systems, IRASSI adopts the het- erodyne principle for detection. As a consequence, satellite distances need not be actively controlled. They have to be measured accurately, however, with high time cadence to estimate the geometric delay terms pivotal for the raw data correlation. In IRASSI, we employ a metrology concept based on coupled laser frequency combs to handle this task. We are actively working on perfecting such a system in the lab, and to come up with a miniaturised breadboard design. A preliminary spacecraft architecture has been designed, including a descrip- tion of the main subsystems of the spacecraft, as well as the corresponding estimates of the mass distribution and the power consumption budget of each subsystem. Furthermore, we have worked out a full mission scenario for IRASSI. We have modelled how a swarm of ve satellites is to be deployed into a Halo orbit around L2. We follow the dynamics of the swarm and iden- tify possible 3D con gurations, for which detailed sky coverage and exclusion regions have been derived for di erent conditions. We are actively working on how to navigate such a swarm, how the attitude of the satellites can be estimated with high precision, how the metrology distance measurements are to be incorporated in order to assess the geometric delays relevant for the correlation process of the interferometric science data, and how the overall baseline estimation procedure can deliver the required accuracy of < 5 m. Looking onto the technological side of the measurement and correlation pro- cess, the recent developments for HEB mixers, quantum cascade laser LO systems and new ASIC-based technology for correlators are promising. We recommend that technology pathways towards a THz mixer performance reaching 3{5 times the quantum limit should be pursued to enable sensitive measurements, in order to o er IRASSI to a wide scienti c community. In the ongoing second project phase, we will put further emphasis on key issues that have emerged from our initial studies, especially how to model thermal and mechanical distortions accurately to integrate them in the baseline de- termination measurement chain, along with the ranging system and relative attitude measurements. In particular, it will be important to work out in 34 detail how to link the laser metrology terminals to the local phase centres for the science signals. For this, a kind of local tie calibration, based on an internal metrology system, has probably to be included to assess deforma- tions of the hardware infrastructure and other disturbances that can a ect the interpretation of the inter-satellite metrology. Acknowledgements IRASSI is a project nanced by the German Ministry of Economy and Energy and administered by the German Aerospace Center, Space Administration (DLR, Deutsches Zentrum fur  Luft-und Raumfahrt, FKZ 50NA1325-28, 50NA1713-16, 50NA1815-18). This work is a coopera- tion between the Institute of Space Technology & Space Applications of the Bundeswehr University (Munich, Germany), the Max Planck Institute for As- tronomy (Heidelberg, Germany), the Institute of Flight Guidance from the Technische Universit at Braunschweig (Braunschweig, Germany) and Menlo Systems GmbH (Martinsried, Germany) as an industry partner. We thank Stefan Kraus for providing us with the 100 m simulation of the protoplan- etary disk shown in Fig. 10. These simulations are by courtesy of Ruobing Dong, Barbara Whitney, and Zhaohuan Zhu. 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Abstract

The far-infrared (FIR) regime is one of the few wavelength ranges where no astronomical data with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution exist yet. Neither of the medium-term satellite projects like SPICA, Millimetron or OST will resolve this malady. For many research areas, however, information at high spatial and spectral resolution in the FIR, taken from atomic ne-structure lines, from highly excited carbon monoxide (CO) and especially from water lines would open the door for transformative science. These demands call for interferometric concepts. We present here rst results of our feasibility study IRASSI (Infrared Astronomy Satellite Swarm Interferometry) for an FIR space interferometer. Extending on the principal concept of the previ- ous study ESPRIT, it features heterodyne interferometry within a swarm of ve satellite elements. The satellites can drift in and out within a range of several hundred meters, thereby achieving spatial resolutions of <0.1 arcsec over the whole wavelength range of 1{6 THz. Precise knowledge on the base- lines will be ensured by metrology methods employing laser-based optical fre- quency combs, for which preliminary ground-based tests have been designed by members of our study team. We rst give a motivation on how the science requirements translate into operational and design parameters for IRASSI. Our consortium has put much emphasis on the navigational aspects of such a free- ying swarm of satellites operating in relatively close vicinity. We hence Preprint submitted to Advances in Space Research July 19, 2019 arXiv:1907.07989v1 [astro-ph.IM] 18 Jul 2019 present work on the formation geometry, the relative dynamics of the swarm, and aspects of our investigation towards attitude estimation. Furthermore, we discuss issues regarding the real-time capability of the autonomous rel- ative positioning system, which is an important aspect for IRASSI where, due to the large raw data rates expected, the interferometric correlation has to be done onboard, in quasi-real-time. We also address questions regard- ing the spacecraft architecture and how a rst thermomechanical model is used to study the e ect of thermal perturbations on the spacecraft. This will have implications for the necessary internal calibration of the local tie between the laser metrology and the phase centres of the science signals and will ultimately a ect the accuracy of the baseline estimations. Keywords: Far-Infrared, Heterodyne Interferometry, Formation Flying, Laser Metrology, Attitude Estimation 1. Introduction Many astronomical breakthroughs came with the advance of observing capabilities and the improvement of the achievable spatial resolution. The Hubble satellite has been delivering di raction-limited data with a spatial resolution of better than 0.1 arcsec in the Optical and UV for 25 years now. In the near-infrared (NIR) one has learned to overcome the disturbing e ects of the turbulent atmosphere by means of adaptive optics, enabling observa- tions with spatial resolutions of better than 0.1 arcsec when combined with 8{10 m class telescopes. Even better spatial resolution is achievable in the in- frared when combining several telescopes in long-baseline interferometry with facilities like the VLTI or the Keck interferometer. In the radio regime, from early on the adoption of interferometry has been a prime concept. VLBI tech- niques achieve sub-milli-arcsec resolution up to frequencies of 86 GHz (and even to 230 GHz; see, e.g., Doeleman et al., 2008). Common interferome- try has spread to ever higher (sub-)millimeter frequencies, with arrays like NOEMA, SMA and especially ALMA as the current state of the art. Hence, we can access the sky at many wavelength regimes with high spatial resolu- tion already. The Far-Infrared (FIR) is a noticable exception. One commonly assigns the wavelength range from 30{300 m (10{1 THz) to the FIR. In this range, the Earth atmosphere is very opaque in general. In particular, in the interval from 2{6 THz, the transmission never rises above 1{3 % even at the best observing sites from the ground, like Dome C in Antarctica (Schneider 2 et al., 2009). Thus, high- ying airborne or space-borne telescopes are imper- ative to collect astronomical information in the FIR. Currently, the spatial resolution obtainable by the previous and by the currently planned missions is modest. In Fig. 1, we have compiled a plot of the theoretical angular reso- lution by several past, present and future missions, to depict the situation. A few comments are in order for this plot. The grey area marks the actual FIR range. The lines denote the theoretical spatial resolution (more precisely, the full width at half maximum of the telescope primary beam) for a uniformly illuminated circular re ector with the nominal size given for these telescopes in the literature. Hence, we neglect that several of these telescopes are not di raction-limited at all wavelengths, and that the re ectors may be tapered or combined with an undersized secondary mirror, which all diminishes the spatial resolution slightly. We have left out the variety of single-dish balloon missions, which, as far as we know, do not currently feature primary mirrors larger than 3 m. While dashed lines mark the full wavelength range covered by these missions, solid lines show the part of the working range where high spectral resolution (at least approaching a resolution of 10 or better) is avail- able. Currently, the best angular resolution in the FIR has been achieved by Herschel. Also the actively planned single-satellite missions like SPICA (Roelfsema et al., 2018), the Origins Space Telescope (OST; Staguhn et al., 2018), or Millimetron (Kardashev et al., 2014) will not push the limit below 1 arcsec (at least not in the 50{300 m sub-range of the FIR), although these missions have great merits in being much more sensitive than previous FIR observatories. Only the two-telescope concept previously brought forward for the FIR direct-detection interferometer SPIRIT (Leisawitz et al., 2007) ap- proaches the sub-arcsecond regime. Its path nder missions BETTII (Rizzo et al., 2016) { and hopefully BETTII 2 { both balloon experiments using two siderostats on a xed 8-m baseline, also just achieve slightly better than 1 arcsec resolution at 6 THz, but already improve on the Herschel spatial resolution. This status quo suggests to contemplate about future missions that can at- tain high spatial resolution to ll the gap in the FIR. In the following, we will give a short motivation for selected astrophysical tracers in the FIR. Then we will introduce our concept for a free- ying FIR interferometer, IRASSI, with emphasis on the choice of some of the technical parameters. Furthermore, For OST the optimistic value of 9 m is used (\Concept-1", Staguhn et al., 2018). 3 Figure 1: Spatial resolution comparison of previous existing FIR missions and for new FIR projects and studies. Solid lines indicate wavelength ranges where high spectral resolution is available. The grey rectangle denotes the FIR range. we mention recent progress in several technological elds that is necessary to make such a mission possible. We then provide an overview of the system architecture and the navigational aspects of our mission study. The paper concludes with an overall summary and outlook on a few key questions that have to be investigated in our upcoming second study phase. 2. Scienti c Motivation The FIR regime contains some unique tracers of di erent kinds of as- trophysical environments. While other references cover the potential science in the FIR in much more detail (e.g., Rigopoulou et al., 2017; Pontoppidan et al., 2018; Kardashev et al., 2014), we just want to highlight a few aspects regarding the unique tracers we nd in the FIR regime. Some of these will 4 also emphasise why high spectral and spatial resolution bring a new dimen- sion to many of the science cases. The FIR covers many of the most important cooling lines of the inter- stellar medium. These are predominantly atomic ne-structure lines, like the [CII] transition at 157.7 m, the [OI] transitions at 63.2 and 145.5 m, the [OIII] lines at 51.8 and 88.4 m, and the [NII] lines at 121.9 and 205.2 m. Those lines (together with [CI] lines at sub-mm wavelengths) contribute to the energy budget of large parts of a molec- ular cloud at low and intermediate densities. Hence, in order to under- stand the complete thermodynamics of the star-formation process in molecular clouds, such tracers are very valuable probes. With velocity- resolved spectral maps in these lines (and complementary ground-based data in lines tracing the dense cold molecular gas), a comparison of the dynamics of the atomic and the molecular gas phase is possible. In particular, [CII] bears importance also as a star-formation tracer in ex- tragalactic studies, which makes it imperative to understand the [CII] emission in Galactic star-forming regions to be able to extrapolate. We note that [ CII] can attain high optical depths (Ossenkopf et al., 2013). A triple of [ CII] hyper ne-structure lines exists as well around 1.9 THz, with the closest component separated by just  11 km/s from the [ CII] line. These isotope lines can be used to assess the optical depth of the main line; obviously, high spectral resolution is mandatory here to disentangle the lines. A strong motivation for observations from space is to observe many transitions of the water molecule H O, a task that is notoriously dif- cult from the ground. Water is relatively easily removed from grain surfaces and hence quite abundant in warmed-up regions, and also in the presence of shocks. Furthermore, in circumstellar disks, the direct detection of water gas in a spatially resolved fashion gives precious information about the water budget in such disks, and would more directly indicate where the (water) snow line is located. This would give very valuable input to gauge planet-formation scenarios. Previous studies showed a low Herschel/HIFI detection rate of H O ground-state transitions at longer wavelengths for a small sample of TTauri disks (Du et al., 2017). However, two studies for T Tauri disks and for Herbig Ae disks by Notsu et al. (2016, 2017) present modelling of higher-excited water lines that better trace the central disk part and are not easily 5 excited in the thinner disk atmosphere. Notsu et al. did not consider the possibility that one could spatially resolve H O emission from in- side the water-snow line in the FIR. But given the maximum baseline lengths for IRASSI, an angular resolution of around 20 milli-arcsec can be achieved for some of such lines, which corresponds to roughly 3 au at the distance of several nearby low-mass star-forming regions (140 pc). Hence, for protoplanetary disks moderately close to Earth, IRASSI could separate the water-gas emission from inside the water-snow line from emission arising from the disk upper layers further out. Molecular gas is predominantly consisting of H molecules which, how- ever, do not possess a permanent dipole moment. Only quite hot H gas can be seen in quadrupole rotational and roto-vibrational transi- tions in the near- and mid-infrared. The singly deuterated isotopologue hydrogen deuteride (HD) has a rotational spectrum, and may be used as a unique proxy to the bulk reservoir of molecular gas in a variety of contexts. Its usefulness as a disk mass tracer, cum grano salis, has recently been shown in works based on Herschel/PACS spectra (Bergin et al., 2013; McClure et al., 2016). The rst two rotational transitions lie at 112.1 m and 56.2 m. Employing HD as a tool is hence a unique capability of the FIR range. The FIR contains a ladder of high-lying rotational transitions for the abundant molecule CO, with upper level energies E /k ranging from up B 249 K up to several thousands of Kelvin. Such tracers probe the warm and hot molecular gas, for instance close to low- and high-mass proto- stars. Having velocity-resolved data at hand is pivotal for disentangling gas directly heated by the central protostar and gas heated and com- pressed due to the presence of shocks. Regarding the continuum sensitivity at the high frequencies of the FIR, a heterodyne interferometer might be at a disadvantage compared to direct-detection interferometers and bolometers with their wide band- widths. Fortunately, in the FIR we catch the dust continuum emission from cold and embedded objects at the peak of their spectral energy dis- tributions. Combining this with the fact that the development of sen- sitive and wide bandwidth heterodyne receivers and backends steadily progresses, it will be possible to deliver high-resolution maps of the FIR continuum for many dust-dominated astrophysical object classes. One 6 very promising aspect in connection with the strong FIR continuum is the detection of gas lines in absorption against the continuum. High spectral resolution can reveal line asymmetries which hint at infall mo- tions. With the instrument GREAT (Heyminck et al., 2012) aboard the SOFIA facility it has been possible to exploit a NH line at around 1.81 THz for that purpose (Wyrowski et al., 2012, 2016). With a beam size of 16 , it was possible to trace inward motions with SOFIA on larger scales, averaged over the extended envelope of a few high-mass protostars. With a facility like IRASSI, we can pinpoint on a hundred times ner scale how the true infall rate is towards the actual protostar. In conclusion, a FIR interferometer like IRASSI can exploit the unique line tracers that this wavelength range provides. It will be particularly fruitful for the research of structure of the planet-forming regions in circumstellar disks, as well as for gas dynamics in the close vicinity around low- and high-mass protostars. But also studies of giant molecular clouds in external galaxies, and towards AGNe, will greatly pro t from the capabilities of such a facility. 3. Principle Concept for IRASSI We present here the concept of a space-borne FIR interferometer. We gave it the name IRASSI (Infrared Astronomy Satellite Swarm Interferom- etry). Currently, this is an extended study, funded by the German Space Agency DLR, for which three German research institutes and an industry partner have joined forces. The initial ideas for IRASSI are strongly rooted in the previous study ESPRIT (Wild et al., 2008) that had been published 11 years ago, and which was one contribution to the FIRI initiative for the ESA Cosmic Visions 2015{2025 (Helmich and Ivison, 2009). IRASSI presents also an extension to previous studies since it actively addresses questions of navigation, swarm dynamics and internal calibration. The central ideas of such a facility are: swarm operation in a Halo orbit around Lagrange point L2 freely drifting satellite elements to sample the (u,v) plane satellite distances do not have to be controlled but just accurately mea- sured and communicated to the correlator inter-satellite metrology via laser-based optical frequency combs employing heterodyne interferometry, detecting electromagnetic waves with amplitude and phase information 7 Parameter Required Value Number of telescopes 5 Number of immediate baselines 10 Size of telescope mirrors 3.5 m (primary mirror) Spacecraft con guration Free- ying in 3D, changed by initiated passive drifts Length range of projected baselines 7-10 m (min) to 850 m (max) Essential wavelength range 50 to 300 m Essential frequency range 1 to 6 THz Frequency bandwidth 2 GHz (min. requirement); 16 GHz dual polarisation (goal) Velocity resolution <1 km/s 00 00 Useful Field of view 3 to 18 (frequency-dependent) Angular resolution 0.1 (at 300 m) 00 00 Telescope pointing accuracy 0.4 (requirement), 0.2 (goal) Accuracy of baseline metrology < 5 m (3D) Temperatures  80 K (main dish, passive cooling); 4 K (mixer, active cooling) Table 1: Basic parameters for the IRASSI concept of a FIR space interferometer. Table 1 summarises the main requirements for several of the key parameters of IRASSI. In the following, we will elaborate on the motivation and reasoning for some of the choices we have made. 3.1. Number of telescopes Several considerations of di erent nature in uence this decision. On the one hand, more telescopes o er more immediate coverage of the (u,v) plane and of the related spatial frequencies. For a number of N interferometer el- ements, there are N (N-1) / 2 immediate baselines, hence, with increasing number of elements, the number of baselines increases faster than linearly. However, with more and more interferometer elements, the complexity of the mission rises drastically. The choice of the telescope number of course a ects most sub-systems, from the demands on the total data transfer between all the elements up to the complexity of the laser metrology system. As another boundary condition, one also has to keep in mind, that only a few interferom- eter elements might be put into space simultaneously with one launch. We 8 Figure 2: A sketch of the principle design for an IRASSI satellite element. Taken from Ferrer-Gil et al. (2016). The drawing is roughly to scale. The ranging system consists of four laser portals for inter-satellite metrology and data transfer and is on the cold side of the sun and heat shields. Among all the attitude sensors, just the star tracker cameras are explicitly visible here, while gyroscopes will be mounted in the interior of the satellites. had done the simulations for launch and transfer to L2 assuming one Ariane 5ECA launch for 5 satellite elements which seems feasible (Buinhas et al., 2016). Certainly, a launcher like the \Falcon Heavy" would be an even more powerful alternative. After the update on the parameters for the Ariane 6-64 in March 2018 , one has to check if also this launcher would be capable to master this task. One can start from a di erent point of view and ask which number of telescopes is essential to achieve certain goals and to recover im- portant quantities. In principle, even with two telescopes (and a meticulously One has to mention that the Ariane 5 model series is due to be discontinued in the future, after the JWST launch. Lagier, R., et al., "ARIANE6", User's Manual, Issue 1, Rev. 0 (March 2018), http://www.arianespace.com/wpcontent/uploads/2018/04/Mua-6 Issue-1 Revision- 0 March-2018.pdf . 9 planned observing strategy) it might be possible to cover considerable parts of the (u,v) plane. However, with two telescopes it is not possible to recover the so-called closure quantities (Thompson et al., 2001) which provide inter- ferometric information that is not a ected by certain measurement errors. Closure Phases: In order to assess this quantity, at least three immediate baselines (and thus three telescopes) are necessary. Though the information is now reduced from three Fourier phases to one closure phase quantity, it is not a ected by additive phase errors anymore. In general, for N interferome- ter elements, (N-1) (N-2) / 2 independent closure phases can be constructed (Thompson et al., 2001, p. 400). Closure phases give important constraints on the geometry of the intensity distribution to be reconstructed. While un- resolved point sources result in closure phases of 0 or 180 , any deviation from these values indicates a deviation from point-symmetry for the intensity distribution (Monnier, 2007). Closure Amplitudes: The closure amplitude is an independent quantity cal- culated for a combination of four stations. For this quantity, amplitude errors cancel out similar to the individual phase errors in the closure phase. The clo- sure amplitude is thus independent of all station-dependent amplitude errors, such as pointing errors or dish deformation. It can be used to compensate for detector gain uctuations and changing antenna eciencies. It does not eliminate baseline-dependent errors, though. For a set of N interferometer elements, there are [N (N-3)] / 2 independent closure amplitudes (Thompson et al., 2001, p. 401). For an unresolved point source, the closure amplitudes should be unity. While closure phases have been used already for a long while in both radio and infrared interferometry, closure amplitudes are not so well known yet, although they are used implicitly in radio interferometry data models. One example where closure amplitudes have been used explicitly is the work of Doeleman et al. (2001) on VLBI observations of the Galactic cen- ter at 86 GHz. Taking all this into account we opt for a ve-element design as a baseline requirement for IRASSI. It allows to retrieve precious closure phase and closure amplitude information. Even if one of the ve elements is compromised, still a reduced number of closure quantities can be recovered. With ve interferometric elements there are: 10 immediate baselines = 10 immediate Fourier phases and amplitudes, 6 independent closure phases, and 5 independent closure amplitudes. 10 3.2. Baseline lengths { Baseline accuracy One of the basic goals of an interferometer like IRASSI would be to deliver sub-arcsecond spatial resolution over the whole FIR frequency range, from 1 to 6 THz. We set as a requirement for IRASSI to achieve 0.1 arcsec angular resolution even at the lowest frequency of 1 THz =b 300m. In order to es- timate the maximum baseline lengths necessary in order to deliver such an angular resolution value, we start with a simple estimate. Assuming that the (u,v)-plane is suciently lled, the uniformly weighted sampling function out to a maximum circle (u,v)-radius of r = = u (with r as the maxi- max max max mum baseline and  as the wavelength) will give rise to a synthesised beam in form of a Bsinc function whose FWHM = 0:705 u (Thompson et al., 2001, max p.389). To achieve FWHM=0.1 arcsec at 300 m calls for baseline lengths up to  425 m according to this relation. Uniform weighting delivers the best spatial resolution, but comes with a relatively high sidelobe level. There will be many situations where a trade-o has to be made between spatial reso- lution and noise performance and, consequently, when natural weighting or certain kinds of (u,v)-tapering will be necessary in post-processing. In order to ensure also in such situations the 0.1-arcsec resolution, we introduce a factor of 2 for the maximum baselines. Hence, IRASSI shall be operational out to maximum baseline lengths of around 850 m as a rm requirement. Regarding the necessary baseline length accuracy, we mention again that we do not need to control these distances. We just need to accurately measure them in order to inform the correlator about the geometric delays to be taken into account. Observations at the shortest wavelengths naturally have the highest demands. A minimum requirement is that the knowledge about the baseline lengths should be better than  =10 in order not to accumulate too min large phase uncertainties. Hence, the baseline length measurement accuracy (in 3D) should be better than 5 m for IRASSI where  = 50m. In such min a setting, we then have to deal with phase uncertainties of several tens of degrees (for the shortest operational wavelengths of IRASSI), as it commonly occurs in real ground-based interferometry at elevated frequencies due to at- mospheric decorrelation e ects. We enter a di erent level of requirements, though, if we demand that baselines are to be calibrated (instantaneously in our case) in the same sense as interferometer element distances are being calibrated on ground. There, by applying calibrator measurement series on unresolved reference sources, one can attempt to push the uncertainties of the baseline lengths down to /360, hence approaching phase uncertainties as small as 1 for these reference phases (Thompson et al., 2001, p. 93). This 11 would put much more stringent requirements for the metrology systems. We will brie y come back to this issue in Section 5.3. 3.3. Telescope diameter { Pointing accuracy In subsection 5.5 we recapitulate how the main re ector size of the individ- ual satellite elements is related to the nal sensitivity of the interferometer; in particular, that a scale-down of the diameter would have to be compen- sated by a disproportionate increase of the number of antennas. Therefore, for the IRASSI study, we consider a small swarm with large but still practical telescope diameters. We assume that the main re ector dishes of the inter- ferometer elements have a diameter of 3.5 m. This choice is of course closely based on the FIR/sub-mm satellite Herschel (Pilbratt et al., 2010) which featured the same telescope diameter. Such mirrors still t into the fairings of currently available large rocket launchers. The relatively large size results in ample collecting area per IRASSI element. This is a crucial prerequisite to conduct sensitive spectral line studies (cf. subsection 5.5), which is of course the main working area for an interferometer like IRASSI. The choice of the mirror size has implications for instance for the neces- sary pointing accuracy of the individual antenna elements. Keep in mind that for a uniformly illuminated antenna with circular aperture of radius r the resulting power pattern (the \primary beam") has a half-power beam width HPBW = 0:514/r and a rst null at 0:610/r (Thompson et al., 2001, p.389). (A realistic choice for such antennas will deviate from uniform illumination in order to lower the sidelobe levels and to avoid standing-wave issues, e.g., by introducing o set or o -axis designs.) Nevertheless, the anks of the power pattern for most designs are usually quite steep. It is obvious that antenna pointing errors (especially the relative pointing error RPE, see below) will (temporarily) displace the maximum of the reception pattern from the observing direction (i.e., the phase centre). Our demands on the pointing accuracy will depend on the short end of the wavelength operational range of IRASSI. With  = 50 m, the HPBW is 3 arcsec for a uniformly min illuminated circular antenna. Modi ed designs for the main and secondary mirrors will slightly widen the main lobe by approximately a factor of 1.1{ 1.4. Assuming a factor of 1.33 compared to the uniform illumination HPBW, we set the minimum requirement for the pointing accuracy to HPBW (50 m)/10 = 0.4 arcsec. However, in order to ensure high-quality interferomet- ric data, it is suggested to pursue even higher accuracies. Napier (1999), for instance, advocates a pointing accuracy of HPBW/20. With this perfor- 12 mance, a source located in the centre of the antenna beam will su er only negligible intensity variations since the reception pattern at HPBW/20 is still around 0.995. The fractional intensity variation for a source located at the half power point of the pattern, however, will already be  0:87, even if the strict limit of HPBW/20 is enforced for the pointing accuracy. One can see that the accuracy of the outer part of the image will be noticeably reduced. Therefore, HPBW (50 m)/20 = 0.2 arcsec is a very desirable goal for the IRASSI pointing accuracy. This goal is desirable for both, absolute and rela- tive pointing errors. Compared to the values achieved with the HERSCHEL satellite of 0.9 arcsec (see Sect. 5.4.1), this calls for a clear improvement of a factor 3{4, but is not unrealistic (cf. Sect. 5.4.1). 4. Technical progress on several fronts 4.1. Data rates and necessity for on-board correlation A principle question is how much raw data are being produced, and whether this amount can be downlinked to Earth for a posteriori correla- tion. The raw data rates can be approximated with this formula (cf. Rajan et al., 2016): D = 2N N N [bit=s] (1) obs pol bits sat For IRASSI, N = 5. Let us assume that just two distinct polarisation sat products will be evaluated (N = 2) and not the full four Stokes parame- pol ters. Let us further assume a bit-rounding level for the sampler/digitiser of N = 2. Regarding the spectral bandwidth  [in Hz] to be covered, we bits have to keep in mind the boundary condition that IRASSI should operate at high frequencies up to 6 THz. To cover a moderate velocity range of 50 km/s around a spectral line, already 2 GHz of bandwidth are necessary at this highest frequency. If IRASSI will operate in a communication mode similar to the Herschel satellite, we could assume 20 hours of autonomous operation (see also Sect. 5.1), and a maximum window of 4 hours of data transfer per operational day. With the chosen parameters, IRASSI will pro- duce an amount of raw data of 5.76e+15 bits every 20 hours. To put this into perspective, we have to compare it to the data that could realistically be downlinked within the communication window. We give two examples. (1) The EUCLID satellite (to be operated in L2, launch 2021) will employ a new K-band (26 GHz) radio telemetry system for the main data transfer. This will enable to downlink the total amount of 850 Gbit of (compressed) 13 data per operational day within a 4-hour communication window, whereby the maximum downlink rate is 74 Mbit/s (Laureijs et al., 2014). The se- vere mismatch between the 8.5e+11 bit/day for EUCLID and the 5.76e+15 bit/day for IRASSI is obvious. (2) Looking more into the future, studies have been undertaken to estimate the data transfer rate using laser links directly to Earth, employing the large telescopes of modern Cherenkov telescope arrays as collecting bowls (Carrasco-Casado et al., 2015). This work estimates e ective data rates of around 700 Mbit/s from an L2-orbit to Earth using this method. The possible amount of data to be transferred within a 4-hours communication window is then 1.01e+13 bit/day. One can conclude that such techniques are not sucient to enable a downlink of the IRASSI raw data to Earth. Even if continuous data downlink capabilities, operating simultaneously to the actual interferometric measurements, could be implemented, and raw data compression factors of 10 could be achieved, it would still take almost 9.5 days to downlink the raw data of one day. (This is just the exercise for the minimum bandwidth of 2 GHz. Remember that there is the ambition to correlate larger bandwidths of 8 or even 16 GHz.) As a consistency check, we also evaluate the data rates after correlation (cf. Rajan et al., 2016): D = 2(N N ) N N =T [bit=s] (2) cor pol sat bits bins For producing these data, one should employ a higher-quality digitisation, e.g., N = 16. With N = 1024 spectral bins, and with a typical cor- bits bins relator averaging time of T=1 s, we arrive at a data rate of 3.28 Mbit/s. Integrated over 20 hours of operation, this amounts to 2.36e+11 bits, which can easily be downlinked within 3200 s when the 74 Mbit/s download rate of a EUCLID-like system is available. A more detailed calculation for the download budget for IRASSI, including realistic parameters for the transmis- sion system (transmitter antenna eciency, transmission path, atmospheric attenuation, etc.) can be found in our related publication (Ferrer-Gil et al., 2016). 4.2. Distributed correlator { power consumption Similar to the ESPRIT study, we therefore also adopt the principle idea of on-board correlation. Such concepts have been discussed for a while now for potential very-low-frequency radio interferometers in space, both with a central correlator unit (e.g., Oberoi and Pin con, 2005) or with a distributed 14 correlator (e.g., Rajan et al., 2016). For IRASSI, we prefer a setup with a frequency-distributed correlator where all ve satellite elements act in a symmetric fashion, and each instance of the distributed correlator correlates 1/5th of the entire spectral bandwidth. Such a symmetric con guration avoids the single-point failure of one central correlator. Even in case one of the ve correlator elements is compromised, still 80% of the full bandwidth could thus be evaluated. The numbers for the raw data rates elaborated on in the previous subsection have also implications for the inter-satellite data communication for such a distributed correlator concept. In the 2-GHz- minimum-bandwidth example, every satellite produces 1.15e+15 bits of raw data per 20 hours. 4/5 of that have to be transmitted to the other 4 satel- lite elements. Hence, every satellite also receives 4/5th of that one-satellite budget = 0.92e+15 bits within 20 hours (i.e., data volume for transmission = data volume for reception). This in turn means that a data exchange rate of 12.8 Gbit/s has to be achieved per satellite. Wider spectral bandwidths of 8 or 16 GHz will push these demands even higher. This calls for a laser data communication system. We currently discuss whether the metrology laser system can be co-used for this purpose. We conceive that the correlation is to be done in quasi-real time. Storage space for the huge amount of raw data would ll up quickly. Hence, the capacity for bu ering raw data would be perhaps just in the order of minutes. (For the above example of 2 GHz bandwidth, every satellite will produce 120 Giga-Byte per minute.) We have not estimated yet the speed of correlation, but expect that also to be fol- lowing real-time. Note that the correlation period can be extended into the communication time window which is several hours long. The necessity to correlate such large amounts of raw data raises the question about the power consumption of the correlator modules. Fortunately, technological develop- ments in recent years have been quite promising. The previous generation of GPU- or FPGA-based correlator modules still showed relatively high gures- of-merit for the energy per complex multiply-accumulate (CMAC) operation (typically around 1.0e-9 Joule). A new generation of application-speci c in- tegrated circuits (ASICs) based on CMOS technology promises much more energy-ecient computing. In the recent study by D'Addario and Wang (2016) such modules are introduced which (for an optimal combination of telescope numbers and bandwidth) can reach 1.8e-12 Joule per CMAC oper- ation for the actual cross-correlation. Even when taking into account further energy demands of such components on a system level, the authors estimate that the total gure-of-merit is still below 1.0e-11 Joule, hence showing a 15 factor of 100 improvement compared to the previous generation of correlator modules. One such ASIC device dissipates 1.824 W (for the actual CMAC operations), and shows a power consumption on the system level (including board-level I/O, power supplies, and controls) on the order of 5 W. One has to admit that the design presented there is optimised for large telescope numbers ( 128) and small bandwidth (a few MHz) per module. But these two parameters work in a kind of trade-o . Given the small number of tele- scopes for IRASSI, such a module could correlate already a bandwidth of several GHz, sucient for the correlator setup per satellite in our frequency- distributed correlator frame work. 4.3. Mixer performance at THz frequencies Much progress has been achieved regarding the technology that enables the rst steps in the detection chain for Tera-Hertz heterodyne observations., i.e., receivers, local oscillators and mixers. Since the ESPRIT study (Wild et al., 2008) we have seen the successful operation of the HIFI instrument (up to 1.9 THz) onboard of the Herschel Space Observatory between 2009-2013, and the ongoing operation of the GREAT/upGREAT instrument (up to 4.7 THz) associated with the SOFIA airborne observatory. A common theme for development in recent years is the combination of Hot Electron Bolome- ter (HEB) mixers (e.g., Shurakov et al., 2016) and Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL) as local oscillators for the heterodyning (e.g., Hub  ers et al., 2013; Vitiello et al., 2015). One important quantity to compare the performance of heterodyne systems to is the quantum noise limit (TQL = h  / k  48 K/THz for single-sideband operation). A gure-of-merit often invoked is 10 TQL, an important border that has to be vanquished in order to stay competitive with incoherent detector systems. More and more experimental THz receiver setups including HEB mixers reach or even transcend this bor- der (e.g., Kloosterman et al., 2013). Currently, values down to 5  TQL have been achieved (Krause et al., 2018). A recommendation in the FIR Roadmap prepared for ESA (Rigopoulou et al., 2017) is to aim for a performance bet- ter than 3  TQL, in order to achieve many of the ambitious science goals collected in that document. Given the current rate of improvements, such a performance will be in reach in the next decade. We note again, that the part of the signal chain will need active cooling to suppress thermal noise in these sensitive devices. New superconducting materials are being tested for inclusion in the HEB mixers. For instance, MgB2 promises a good com- bination of low noise, wide noise bandwidth, and the possibility to operate 16 such mixers at slightly elevated temperatures beyond 5-20 K (Novoselov and Cherednichenko, 2017). On the other hand, new setups promise to place the mixer and heterodyne in the same cryostat (Seliverstov et al., 2017), which will be bene cial for further miniaturisation of such structural components. 5. Focus points of our study: Navigation, system architecture, baseline metrology, attitude estimation, sensitivity IRASSI is undoubtedly a complex and ambitious mission concept. The focus of our own work in the IRASSI team, besides the advancement of accurate metrology via laser frequency combs, is on navigational aspects of such a mission, and to devise a realistic view on the system architecture of such satellites. We give here just short summaries of our work and refer to our original publications for detailed descriptions. 5.1. Formation ying, relative dynamics, and modes of operation A full simulation has been performed in Buinhas et al. (2016) for the launch and transfer of the 5-satellite swarm to the Lagrange point L2, where the satellites are to be injected into a Halo orbit, using the General Mis- sion Analysis Tool (GMAT). Furthermore, a Delta-v budget for necessary accelerations over the mission timeline has been estimated, which includes contributions for the initial transfer to L2, station keeping (to remain in a quasi-Halo orbit around L2), and for routine operations (formation recon gu- ration, baseline change initiation, ne target acquisition). The total number is estimated to be around 300 m/s per spacecraft (Buinhas et al., 2017). This has implications of course for the choice of the propulsion systems, whereby di erent requirements are valid for di erent tasks. Especially the more frequent tasks requiring high control precision take more than 80% of this budget. Di erent technologies have been identi ed which can provide the thrust level required by IRASSI for such tasks. These include pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), eld emission electrostatic propulsion (FEEP), col- loidal thrusters, and cold gas thrusters. PPTs might have issues since pulsed operations may introduce disturbances; this needs further investigation. Cold gas thrusters are probably discarded since they require a large amount of fuel. Due to the experimental nature of FEEPs, currently colloidal thrusters seem to be the prime candidates for a secondary propulsion system. The ( ne) target acquisition at the beginning of a measurement can call for a quite extended time span of around one hour or more, especially if one decides to 17 do this via micro thrusters and not via reaction wheels. This includes time for internal pre-calibration, laser re-acquisition, and time to allow exible motions to subside after recon guration and re-pointing. The distance to the Sun-Earth L2 location is such that realtime commu- nications and availability are limited and that the spacecraft ought to be embedded with a high degree of autonomy to maneuver during the opera- tional phase throughout the mission, as well as for carrying out vital house- keeping tasks, such as avoiding collisions. We encounter several challenges: a stringent position accuracy requirement, the real-time capability of the positioning algorithm and the deviation of the measured satellite distances between some ranging system and the desired distance between the tele- scope reference points. In Frankl et al. (2017), we approach these challenges by developing and testing two autonomous relative positioning algorithms, based on a geometric snapshot approach. The goal of these algorithms is to determine the coordinates of the telescope reference positions, treating the full 3D uncertainties of the reference points. One promising algorithm transforms the distance measurements between the ranging systems to the telescope reference positions using attitude and angular measurements, while subsequently an optimisation problem is formulated taking into account only the transferred distance measurements. Follow-up work in this regard has been presented by us in Philips-Blum et al. (2018). The results of this pa- per show that the required baseline accuracy between the satellites of 5 m cannot easily be achieved by the basic snapshot method with the currently assumed measurement accuracies of around 1 m. The geometric snapshot method is time-consuming in that it requires several iterations to achieve convergence. Thus, a lter-based approach will be considered in the future. Since lter-based approaches incorporate a process model, the in uence of acceleration forces on each satellite was investigated. It could be shown that the in uence is major such that di erent accelerations need to be taken into account for any satellite in general. In future work, a lter-based approach considering such accelerations will be investigated. We also simulated realistic scenarios for the swarm con gurations (Buinhas et al., 2018). We found that if arranged in a strictly planar con guration, the relative positioning determination procedure is hampered. We therefore treat the general case of non-coplanar geometries, where the satellites are staggered in 3D in a kind of pyramid con guration (see Fig. 3). Here, the (x,y,z) coor- dinates are assumed to be at the initial formation locations (0,0,0), (0,a,0), (0,0,-2a),(a/4,a/2,-a), and (-a/4,a/3,-2/3 a), and subsequently drift motions 18 Figure 3: Sketch of the nominal formation geometry (adapted from Buinhas et al., 2018). In this general case, the formation will not be co-planar, but in a true 3D con guration (see text). are initiated and followed by the dynamics computation. For these simula- tions, we take the concrete geometry of the satellite, including the size of the sun-shield, and the location of the laser metrology terminals into account for predicting the sky coverage, and the location of exclusion regions. The latter occur due to at least two instances: (1) the fact that the sun-shield creates an exclusion cone for the laser beams when looking \down" along its own host satellite. When no laser metrology is possible to one of the other satellites such a setup has to be avoided, since in such a case the correlation of the science data would be compromised. (2) Furthermore, when satellites come close, shadowing of one satellite by another has to be avoided, obviously, to not block the FIR science signal from reaching the receiver. The resulting e ects are depicted in Fig. 4. The blue regions show the immediate sky cov- erage for a speci c epoch. As the IRASSI swarm revolves around the Sun within one year, basically the whole sky can be covered eventually. But for a concrete epoch, targets located in the exclusion regions have to be avoided. 19 Figure 4: Instantaneous sky coverage (blue) and exclusion regions (red) for two sizes of the initial satellite con guration (see text above, and Fig. 3). Left: The small con guration scenario, where the length parameter a = 40 m. Right: The large con guration scenario, where the length parameter a = 400 m. A suitable target allocation strategy must therefore ensure that the physical disposition of the formation does not inhibit the observations throughout the entire observations period. An important capability of IRASSI will be to probe a variety of spatial frequencies, and to eventually probe compact emission with resolution ele- ments of < 0.1 arcsec in the far-infrared. IRASSI shall be able to integrate and take interferometric data while gradually changing the baselines. The above mentioned case of 20-hour drifts are for such applications for which the combination of good (u,v) coverage and high sensitivity is mandatory, for instance when a high- delity image reconstruction is being attempted for weak line sources. In principle, other modes of operation are possible. Larger surveys of moderately bright sources could utilise a strategy where the swarm is kept in one con guration without relative drifts, observing several possi- ble targets in a row, and changing to di erent distinct con gurations and repeating the observational series consecutively. The (u,v) coverage will be more sparse, but may still allow an image reconstruction. Then, of course, the data acquisition is spread over many operational days. This implies that the nal data post processing on ground can just start when all data have been gathered, and the scheduling for such series should be done in a way that all the necessary con gurations can be met before some targets leave their visibility patch for several weeks or even months. Finally, for strong sources, also a snapshot mode can be envisioned where important informa- tion can already be obtained from relatively short observations on the order of one or a few hours in one con guration. A full image reconstruction may 20 not be possible. But crucial interferometric parameters like closure phases (see Sect. 3.1) or di erential phases can already tell a lot about the geometry and symmetry of the emission regions which then can be compared to mod- els. The latter two modes have been employed in the previous generation of ground-based infrared interferometers like MIDI or AMBER at the VLTI. We are actively working on such issues of operational modes. For the drift mode, we started by just considering passive drifts where the pathways in the (u,v) plane approach straight lines. This results in peculiar shapes for the syn- thesized beam and calls for attention when applying the common inversion and deconvolution techniques like CLEAN. We think that the application of di erent approaches for such tasks has to be studied, for instance by invok- ing sparse-sampling algorithms, as has been done already for radio data with LOFAR (Garsden et al., 2015). Too symmetric drift con gurations (in terms of relative angles of the satellite paths) and too similar drift velocities will lead to degeneracies in the (u,v) plane coverage. To better ll the (u,v) plane, the application of acceleration maneuvers during a measurement campaign is necessary, which of course has an impact on the formation dynamics, on the operations as well as on the fuel budget. We plan to address these issues for all the three cases mentioned above in a future publication (Buinhas et al., in prep.). 5.2. System architecture and stability requirements Based on the main requirements of the mission and the related stabil- ity requirements, a preliminary spacecraft design has been developed (see Fig. 2), including a description of the main subsystems of the spacecraft (Ferrer-Gil et al., 2016). Included are rst estimates of the mass distribution and the power consumption budget of the di erent subsystems (mechanical & thermal, payload, attitude and orbit control, propulsion, communication, command and data handling, power). We estimate that total power of  1780 W will be needed per satellite element, including a 20% margin. Assuming current technology of multi-junction GaAs-based solar cells, it is estimated that they will be able to generate 251 W/m at the Lagrange point L2 at the end of their life. We conclude that 8.4 m of solar cells will be required at each spacecraft to provide the required power, which is somewhat smaller than the solar panel area for the Herschel satellite ( 12 m ). The heaviest single parts within the satellite will be the primary mirror ( 231 kg) and an optical bench ( 236 kg). The presented spacecraft design has been used to assess the e ect of environmental thermal uctuations on the stability of 21 the spacecraft. The major components, except the service module, will be subject to the passive cooling by the heat shields. For the receiver/mixer components in the signal chain we will need active cooling to reach the very low temperatures of down to 4 K. Hence, these components have to be en- capsulated in a cryostat. Sorption coolers could be a choice since they do not introduce excessive vibrations into the satellite system. We nd that the primary mirror can introduce relatively high distortions in the critical parts of the spacecraft. This is of course due to its quite large diameter of 3.5 m, so that the mirror thermally in uences its surrounding elements, including the optical bench. Based on these results it is recommended to investigate techniques to thermally isolate the primary mirror in order to reduce its in- uence to the dimensional stability of the spacecraft. This could be achieved by a proper mounting and protecting the primary mirror with a bae. The optical bench probably has to be based on low-expansion-index materials like Zerodur or Silicon Carbide. It has to be further investigated whether such design features can ensure that the path between the laser metrology termi- nals and the science instruments remains under control. It may be necessary to consider an internal metrology setup to calibrate these internal pathways. Important conceptual work in that regard had already been done in the con- text of preparing for the interferometric astrometry mission SIM (cf. Dekens et al., 2004). Careful alignment and thermal monitoring is of course a major point in the design of all space-borne astronomical satellites (see e.g., Bos et al., 2012, for the James Webb Space Telescope). Another important con- clusion is that attitude changes can produce higher dimensional distortions than solar ux changes due to the more gradual Sun distance changes. This suggests that observations of the infrared sources should be scheduled trying to minimize the necessary orientation change of the telescope in order to min- imize the introduced distortions. Adequate procedures should be developed to monitor and calibrate these e ects (Ferrer-Gil et al., 2016). 5.3. Precise Metrology { Optical Frequency Combs One advantage of a heterodyne system compared to direct detection infer- ometers is that precise distances between the satellite elements do not have to be controlled during the measurements. One needs, however, a versatile inter-satellite metrology system in order to measure the distances contin- uously with high time cadence. This is especially true for our particular concept of freely drifting satellite elements, for which relative motions in the order of cm/s are envisioned. We propose to employ optical frequency combs 22 Figure 5: Performance of the experimental two-combs setup for distance metrology. The upper curve is for time-of- ight (TOF) measurements and the lower curve represents the interferometric measurement. The interferometric measurement becomes unambiguous when the TOF measurement becomes < =2, i.e., at around 10 ms. for such a metrology task. For such a comb, which is generated by periodic pulses of a femto-second laser, all resulting optical-frequency teeth have the same frequency o set to their immediate neighbours. This frequency spacing is given by the pulse repetition rate f of the laser. Typical values for f lie at r r 10 MHz up to 10 GHz. The comb is shifted with respect to zero by the o set frequency f . All mode frequencies of the optical frequency comb can be transformed into radio frequencies (RF) by the comb equation f = n f +f n r 0 and hence can be heterodyne transformed and processed using established RF electronics. Menlo Systems has carefully evaluated several methods how a laser frequency comb can be used for precision distance ranging. For the purpose of IRASSI, we nd that double-comb interferometry (Coddington et al., 2009) o ers great perspectives. For such a method, a pair of two combs, having pulse trains of slightly di erent repetition periods (T and T T ), are being used. One comb sends out the metrology signal that r r is re ected at the distant satellite and returns back where it is heterodyne- 23 combined with the second comb that serves as a local oscillator, providing shotnoise-limited performance. The concept enables us to achieve high mea- surement sampling that is governed by the ratio T =T . Our IRASSI system allows a real-time reduction of the data with a high duty cycle of up to 50 kHz. A customised digitiser with FPGA unit is used for data acquisition and real-time evaluation, programmed by specialists at Menlo Systems. In Fig. 5, we show a result from our lab measurements. Di erent approaches have been tested, whereby the combs were locked onto RF and onto optical references. Signi cantly better results have been achieved with the optical lock, providing accuracies down to 10 m within 10 ms. An additional ad- vantage of the optical lock compared to RF lock is, that it can be compared and calibrated to an atomic transition. We may come back to the question raised in Section 3.2 concerning whether also higher precision can be reached to calibrate the baseline lengths (in realtime) as is done for the antenna positions on ground for ground-based interferometers (using dedicated cali- bration runs in the latter case). We think that this is possible as shown by the lower measurement curve in Fig. 5. After 10 ms of averaging time, this particular setup resulted in around 0.01 m accuracy. This would push the phase uncertainty of the incoming wavefronts due to baseline uncertainties to < 0:1 even for our shortest wavelength of 50 m. Currently, the lab setup is contained in a larger electronics rack. However, for the ongoing second study phase, we plan to come up with a miniaturised bread-board design. For sounding rocket projects, Menlo Systems has developed devices where the optical unit is around 1 litre in volume, and consumes less than 50 W, already ful lling many of the requirements for a satellite application. This design will be adapted for the dual-comb ranging. We envision to have the actual frequency comb units close to the service module, where the power can be dissipated under controled conditions. The laser signals will be conducted to the terminals of the ranging system via bers. The direction along which the terminals are mounted is not xed and they are vectorizable within 90 both in azimuth and elevation (relative to the optical bench frame). Further- more, because only a small spectral section of the comb with a bandwidth of less than 1 nm is actually used for each baseline, one double comb per satel- lite is sucient to support all 4 optical links to its satellite neighbors. The baseline links between the satellites will also be bi-directional, and can ad- ditionally be used for fast data transfer and exchange between the satellites. All frequency combs will be coherently locked to the same optical master reference, which will also be distributed via the optical links. Because the 24 satellites are drifting the optical reference has to be Doppler-compensated for each satellite. 5.4. Studies on Attitude Estimation and Control 5.4.1. High Accuracy \Attitude Determination/Estimation and Control Sys- tem (ADCS)" Spacecraft System Accuracy achieved [arcsec] Total accuracy required Attitude estimation 0.03 (best-case), 0.1 (worst) 0.4 Attitude control 0.02 (best-case) Table 2: IRASSI spacecraft pointing accuracies achieved by attitude estimation and control systems. For the Herschel FIR satellite, the pointing performance, both in APE and RPE , could be brought to an rms of 0.9 arcsec (S anchez-Portal et al., 2014). This was eventually achieved with a robust concept of commercial optical CCD star trackers in combination with a gyro system, after some ini- tial problems had been understood and resolved as the active mission went along. Considering our goal of 0.2 arcsec for the IRASSI antennas, this shows, that it will not be sucient to just replicate the Herschel attitude estimation and control concept for the IRASSI antennas. Therefore, the IRASSI study covers active research on attitude determination/estimation and related control systems. Figure 6 shows the components of IRASSI's high accuracy \Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS)" which are Attitude Estimation System (AES) and Attitude Control System (ACS) that were designed and developed, and according to our simulations achieve unprecedented stringent attitude estimation and control (best-case) accura- cies of 0.03 and 0.02 arcsec respectively (cf. Table 2). As shown in Fig. 7, the total pointing accuracy/error can be separated into two parts, i.e. pointing accuracy from AES and ACS systems known as Measurement Error (ME) and Control Error (CE), respectively. This leads to (theoretically) achieving the imposed total pointing accuracy requirement of 0.4 arcsec (with the goal The absolute pointing error (APE) is de ned as the angular separation between the desired pointing direction and the instantaneous actual pointing direction. The relative pointing error (RPE) is the angular separation between the instantaneous pointing direction and the short-time average (e.g., 60 s) pointing direction at a given time period. 25 Figure 6: IRASSI's High Accuracy Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS). of 0.2 arcsec) on the IRASSI spacecrafts. This also leaves enough margin for pointing errors due to other space sub-systems like IRASSI reaction wheels (required for attitude slews and part of ongoing IRASSI work), thruster ring (used for IRASSI formation control), cryogenic coolers, propellant sloshing and other structural instabilities, to name a few. 5.4.2. Attitude Estimation System (AES) High Accuracy attitude estimation accuracy of 0.03 arcsec is accomplished by AES which involves carefully selected high accuracy commercial-o -the shelf sensors and implementing a state-of- the-art optimal attitude estimation algorithm for sensor data fusion in Matlab. Table 3 shows the sensor-suite selected for high accuracy AES. During the ne-pointing/scienti c observa- tion mission mode of IRASSI, data from a star tracker (single or multiple) is fused with data from a gyroscope assembly (where each assembly con- sists of 4-gyro heads mounted in an octahedral tetrad con guration) via a Multiplicative Extended Kalman Filter (MEKF). For coarse attitude acqui- 26 Figure 7: Attitude de nitions: Pointing Error (PE), Measurement Error (ME) and Control Error (CE). Table 3: Sensor Suite for High accuracy Attitude Estimation System. sition mode, measurements from a Sun Sensor and Gyroscopes are fused via MEKF. Three ltering schemes are developed for ne-pointing mode (as shown in Fig. 8 and Table 5) where a 3-axis gyroscope is fused with single and two simultaneously operating (oriented in orthogonal directions) star trackers in Centralized and Decentralized Schemes. Table 4 lists the attitude accuracies achieved by simulations (as shown in Fig. 9) of these above men- tioned schemes, all of which utilize an analytic lter algorithm named MEKF as explained above. IRASSI is the rst mission that makes the information on fusion of two simultaneously operating star trackers for attitude estima- tion public, even though this idea is also used for the BepiColombo mission to Mercury. This study also led to the placement (position and orientation) 27 Figure 8: Centralized (upper) and de-centralised (lower) ltering schemes. Estimation (Sensor Fusion) Cases Accuracy achieved 1 STR and Gyro fusion 0.03 arcsec (1) Centralized case 0.03 arcsec (1) Decentralized case 0.03 arcsec (1) Table 4: Pointing accuracy results for Centralized and Decentralized cases of the IRASSI sensors onboard IRASSI spacecraft. This is also indicated in Fig. 2. More details can be found in Bhatia et al. (2017). 5.4.3. High Accuracy Attitude Control System (ACS) Feasibility check of three attitude control algorithms, namely Sliding Mode control (SMC), Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and Proportional- Derivative (PD) control led to an achievement of 0.02 arcsec for small-angle rest-to-rest maneuvers. The high accuracy pointing requirement that IRASSI imposes on the ADCS is for \small angle maneuvers" because once the sci- ence observations start, i.e., once the spacecraft points to a scienti c target, there will be only small deviations in the spacecraft attitude from this scien- ti c target. But since \large angle maneuvers" (that are required by many other telescopic and non-telescopic space missions) are the most dicult atti- 28 Figure 9: The attitude accuracy (in arcsec) found in our simulations for a 22-hour interval for three cases. Up: one star tracker and Gyro fusion; Middle: centralised case; Bottom: decentralised case. 29 IRASSI Mission Modes Attitude Estimation lters Corresponding Attitude Control Fine-pointing mode Gyro + 1 Star Tracker Sliding Mode Controller (SMC), Gyro + 2 Star Trackers Linear Quadratic (centralised) Regulator (LQR), Gyro + 2 Star Trackers Linear & nonlinear (de-centralised) PD controllers Coarse Attitude Gyro + coarse Sun sensor Acquisition Mode Table 5: IRASSI mission modes and the corresponding attitude lters and controllers. tude maneuvers to perform due to the nonlinearities of the system dynamics, properties of attitude parameters utilized, accumulation of disturbances and exposure to varying disturbances, we check the feasibility of these control algorithms in achieving tens-of-subarcsec accuracy for these maneuvers, too. Three disturbances that were fed-forward to the spacecraft nonlinear dy- namics, namely gravity-gradient torque, solar-radiation pressure torque and a constant torque (to account for unforeseen disturbances, shown in Fig. 6, left) are that encountered by IRASSI spacecraft in its halo-orbit at Sun-Earth L2. Stability analysis of these controllers showed their robustness regarding these disturbances as shown in Table 6. These controllers are \almost" globally stable. Quaternions which are chosen as the attitude parameters for ADCS, have an ambiguity when describing rotations within 360 degrees; both, a cer- tain quaternion and its inverse describe the same rotation within the Special Orthogonal, SO(3), space. Hence due to the ambiguity of quaternions within 360 degree, the stability of these controllers is relaxed to \almost" global asymptotic stability in the sense of Lyapunov where asymptotic stability is de ned over an \open" and dense set in SO(3). All three control algorithms are feasible for IRASSI's ne-pointing and coarse attitude-acquisition modes as shown in Table 5 and 6. These results are substantiated by simulations of these analytical control algorithms. More details about this study can be found in Bhatia, D. in prep. (\Final Report: IRASSI 2 Phase 1", to be published at Hanover University Library). In summary, 0.03 arcsec and 0.02 arcsec accuracies from attitude estima- tion and control systems, respectively, lead to a total of 0.05 arcsec pointing 30 Table 6: Performance Comparison of SMC, PD and LQR control design for IRASSI Space- craft attitude tracking rest-to-rest maneuvers. accuracy from ADCS (theoretically). Hence, we conclude that IRASSI's de- sired goal accuracy of 0.2 arcsec can be achieved, leaving sucient margins for other factors that a ect the pointing accuracies as discussed before. Cur- rently, we are investigating the reaction wheel assembly required for phys- ically rotating IRASSI spacecraft, speci cally during ne pointing mode. Also control allocation algorithms where the control torques calculated by the attitude control algorithms are distributed amongst the redundant reac- tion wheels to physically maneuver IRASSI telescope are under investigation, which will provide a realistic insight into the performance of the complete ACS. 5.5. Preliminary sensitivitiy estimates One future task will be to include many aspects of the IRASSI design in a comprehensive performance simulation. Here, we want to give just an order of magnitude estimate for the achievable sensitivity, to guide the reader what to expect from a facility like IRASSI. We will employ the standard sensitivity equation for radio interferometry. We use the following form: 2k T B sys = p (3) =4 D  N (N 1) N corr ap A A pol Tel 2 1 { noise in the correlated data, in W m Hz k { Boltzmann constant T { system temperature, in K sys { correlator eciency corr { aperture eciency ap D { single-dish telescope diameter; 3.5 m for IRASSI Tel 31 N { number of antennas; 5 for IRASSI N { number of polarisation products, 2 for IRASSI pol { frequency bandwidth, in Hz { on-source integration time, in s For simplicity, we assume here that T is dominated by the receiver/mixer sys noise temperatures. For  we adopt the value of 0.88, a number that is corr commonly invoked for correlators processing input stream data with 4-level 2-bit digitisation (e.g., D'Addario, 1989). For the aperture eciency  we ap have no rm values yet. Looking back to the Herschel satellite, its telescope (with the same 3.5 m diameter as anticipated for IRASSI) had an aperture eciency on the order of 0.6, as measured by HIFI calibration observations . We therefore adopt this value as a conservative preliminary estimate. We give two numbers as examples. In both cases we assume that a T on the sys order of three times the theoretical quantum limit (TQL  48 K/THz) can be achieved; admittedly a very ambitious goal, but in line with recommendations in Rigopoulou et al. (2017). One estimate is relevant for line measurements, e.g., at the frequency of the [CII] line at 1.9 THz. A 1 km/s channel at this frequency covers 6.333 MHz. After an integration time of 20 hours (the typical time for IRASSI to let the drifting satellites ll the (u,v) plane), the rms noise in such a channel would amount to 35 mJy. For a line with 3 km/s FWHM line width, and sampled with 1 km/s channels, this would be 20 2 equivalent to a 5- line ux of 3:5  10 W/m . The second computation is done for the frequency of 3 THz, corresponding to 100 m wavelength. Assuming that the receiver/backend system delivers a full bandwidth of 16 GHz in dual polarisation, after 20 hours of integration a continuum noise value of 1.1 mJy can be achieved. (This scales to 4.9 mJy for 1 hour of integration.) To give some perspective, we include here a simulation of a pre- transitional protoplanetary disk, originally published in Kraus et al. (2014). This is a result of a hydrodynamics simulation for the case when four Jupiter- mass proto-planets interact at di erent orbital radii with the disk material. The disk is inclined by 30 , the full eld-of-view is 80 au. The subsequent radiative transfer simulates the appearance at 100 micron. The result is shown in Fig. 10. We mark the locations of the four planets with circles the https://www.cosmos.esa.int/documents/12133/996743/The+HIFI+Beam+- +Release+No1+Release+Note+for+Astronomers 32 Figure 10: Radiative transfer simulation at a wavelength of 100 m on top of a hydro simulation of a transitional disk with four embedded proto-planets. Resolution elements for IRASSI at 100 m and 63.2 m (the wavelength of the strong [OI] ne-structure line) are indicated. The underlying simulation data have rst been shown in Kraus et al. (2014). size of an IRASSI resolution element at this wavelength. We emphasize that the outermost proto-planet concentration (the compact brightness peak 20 au from the central star) attains a ux density of around 23 mJy according to this simulation. Hence, at least regarding the sensitivities, such an object could be well detectable with IRASSI. Equation 3 makes it obvious that the telescope diameter D is an important Tel factor for the sensitivity, since it enters this formula with the squared power. 0:5 On the other hand, for larger numbers of telescope elements, [N (N 1)] A A approaches N , hence just a linear term. Thus, it is more dicult to gain sensitivity by adding more satellite elements. To achieve the same sensitivity as a ve-element interferometer with 3.5-m antennas, it would take nine satellites with 2.5 m diameter, for instance. 33 6. Summary and outlook We have shown the principle design of IRASSI, a free- ying FIR interfer- ometer with ve satellite elements at the Lagrange point L2, which shall cover an essential frequency range between 1{6 THz and shall deliver an angular resolution of better than 0.1 arcsec over the whole working range. Compared to other concepts employing direct detection systems, IRASSI adopts the het- erodyne principle for detection. As a consequence, satellite distances need not be actively controlled. They have to be measured accurately, however, with high time cadence to estimate the geometric delay terms pivotal for the raw data correlation. In IRASSI, we employ a metrology concept based on coupled laser frequency combs to handle this task. We are actively working on perfecting such a system in the lab, and to come up with a miniaturised breadboard design. A preliminary spacecraft architecture has been designed, including a descrip- tion of the main subsystems of the spacecraft, as well as the corresponding estimates of the mass distribution and the power consumption budget of each subsystem. Furthermore, we have worked out a full mission scenario for IRASSI. We have modelled how a swarm of ve satellites is to be deployed into a Halo orbit around L2. We follow the dynamics of the swarm and iden- tify possible 3D con gurations, for which detailed sky coverage and exclusion regions have been derived for di erent conditions. We are actively working on how to navigate such a swarm, how the attitude of the satellites can be estimated with high precision, how the metrology distance measurements are to be incorporated in order to assess the geometric delays relevant for the correlation process of the interferometric science data, and how the overall baseline estimation procedure can deliver the required accuracy of < 5 m. Looking onto the technological side of the measurement and correlation pro- cess, the recent developments for HEB mixers, quantum cascade laser LO systems and new ASIC-based technology for correlators are promising. We recommend that technology pathways towards a THz mixer performance reaching 3{5 times the quantum limit should be pursued to enable sensitive measurements, in order to o er IRASSI to a wide scienti c community. In the ongoing second project phase, we will put further emphasis on key issues that have emerged from our initial studies, especially how to model thermal and mechanical distortions accurately to integrate them in the baseline de- termination measurement chain, along with the ranging system and relative attitude measurements. In particular, it will be important to work out in 34 detail how to link the laser metrology terminals to the local phase centres for the science signals. For this, a kind of local tie calibration, based on an internal metrology system, has probably to be included to assess deforma- tions of the hardware infrastructure and other disturbances that can a ect the interpretation of the inter-satellite metrology. Acknowledgements IRASSI is a project nanced by the German Ministry of Economy and Energy and administered by the German Aerospace Center, Space Administration (DLR, Deutsches Zentrum fur  Luft-und Raumfahrt, FKZ 50NA1325-28, 50NA1713-16, 50NA1815-18). This work is a coopera- tion between the Institute of Space Technology & Space Applications of the Bundeswehr University (Munich, Germany), the Max Planck Institute for As- tronomy (Heidelberg, Germany), the Institute of Flight Guidance from the Technische Universit at Braunschweig (Braunschweig, Germany) and Menlo Systems GmbH (Martinsried, Germany) as an industry partner. We thank Stefan Kraus for providing us with the 100 m simulation of the protoplan- etary disk shown in Fig. 10. These simulations are by courtesy of Ruobing Dong, Barbara Whitney, and Zhaohuan Zhu. 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