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Imaging Black Holes and Jets with a VLBI Array Including Multiple Space-Based Telescopes

Imaging Black Holes and Jets with a VLBI Array Including Multiple Space-Based Telescopes Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) from the ground at millimeter wavelengths can resolve the black hole shadow around two supermassive black holes, Sagittarius A* and M87. The addition of modest telescopes in space would allow the combined array to produce higher-resolution, higher- delity images of these and other sources. This paper explores the potential bene ts of adding orbital elements to the Event Horizon Telescope. We reconstruct model images using simulated data from arrays including telescopes in di erent orbits. We nd that an array including one telescope near geostationary orbit and one in a high-inclination medium Earth or geosynchronous orbit can succesfully produce high- delity images capable of resolving shadows as small as 3 as in diameter. One such key source, the Sombrero Galaxy, may be important to address questions regarding why some black holes launch powerful jets while others do not. Meanwhile, higher-resolution imaging of the substructure of M87 may clarify how jets are launched in the rst place. The extra resolution provided by space VLBI will also improve studies of the collimation of jets from active galactic nuclei. Keywords: galaxies: jets; techniques: high angular resolution; techniques: interferometric; quasars: supermassive black holes c 2019. This manuscript version is made available Hirabayashi et al., 1998), and RadioAstron (Kardashev under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license et al., 2013). Arrays with two space-borne elements have been proposed before at frequencies up to 43 GHz and 86 GHz (Hong et al., 2004; Murphy et al., 2005). 1. Introduction The EHT is a millimeter-wavelength VLBI array whose primary goal is to image nearby supermassive black holes The angular resolution of an interferometric baseline and jets of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Currently ob- is approximately the observing wavelength divided by the serving at  = 1:3 mm (230 GHz), the fringe spacing (=B, baseline length =B. The choice of observing wavelength where B is the projected baseline length) of the longest is often xed by source properties, and in any case atmo- baselines correspond to an angular resolution . 25 as, spheric absorption imposes site-dependent limits on what which is sucient to resolve the shadow of the supermas- is possible. Many terrestrial arrays using very long base- sive black holes of Sagittarius A* and M87. The EHT is line interferometry (VLBI), such as the Very Long Base- currently upgrading telescopes to perform VLBI at  = line Array (VLBA) or the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), 0:87 mm (345 GHz), which will further improve angular achieve high angular resolution by having telescopes that resolution by a factor of 1.5. are thousands of kilometers apart. Here too, the size of the The EHT has developed imaging algorithms to produce Earth imposes fundamental limits on the longest achiev- superresolved images to make the most out of its data able baseline from the ground. (e.g., Bouman et al., 2016; Chael et al., 2016; Akiyama et Longer baselines are achievable with space-borne ele- al., 2017a,b; Kuramochi et al., 2018). Nevertheless, the ments. Space VLBI has successfully been accomplished at EHT is up against some hard limits. The Earth's atmo- centimeter wavelengths with the Tracking and Data Re- sphere quickly becomes unsuitable for ground-based VLBI lay Satellite System (TDRSS; Levy et al., 1986), Highly at higher frequencies, and existing baselines already ap- Advance Laboratory for Communications and Astronomy proach an Earth diameter. In order to achieve higher an- (HALCA) VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP; gular resolution, it will be necessary to incorporate space- borne elements into VLBI arrays of the future. Corresponding author Adding space-borne antennas to the EHT opens up new Email address: vfish@haystack.mit.edu (Vincent L. Fish) science that is very dicult or impossible from the ground. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Preprint submitted to Advances in Space Research March 25, 2019 arXiv:1903.09539v1 [astro-ph.IM] 22 Mar 2019 Reconstructing reliable movies of Sgr A* is likely to require the cost per satellite, potentially allowing for more satel- fast (u; v) coverage not currently obtainable from Earth- lites to be built and launched. A rideshare strategy argues rotation aperture synthesis (Palumbo et al., 2018). The for choosing classes of orbits with frequent launches (e.g., ability to resolve and image ne-scale structures (smaller LEO and GEO) rather than requiring bespoke orbital pa- than the gravitational radius, r = GM=c ) in the ow rameters. around M87 will help enormously in understanding the Our vision assumes improvements in some space-borne details of how jets are launched. Adding to the EHT one telescope subsystems that we believe to be tractable within or more telescopes near geosynchronous orbit would enable less than a decade. We assume that an aperture of a few detailed study of other black hole sources such as the Som- meters in diameter with appropriate surface accuracy for brero Galaxy, an M87 analogue with a much weaker jet. observations at 1.3 mm can be deployed cheaply. One Space VLBI will also help answer the question of whether promising approach might be to stow the surface within a jet collimation is universal across a wide range of jet power. standard secondary payload volume and unfurl it in space. And, as is clear from the diversity of presentations at the Other approaches may become nancially viable as the in- workshop \The Future of High-Resolution Radio Interfer- creasing number of commercial launch opporunities drive ometry in Space" held in Noordwijk, The Netherlands, in costs down. We assume that stable receivers and signal 2018 , AGN jet science is just one of the many areas where chains with bandwidths of many GHz can provide ade- space VLBI could have a large impact. quate sensitivity at a cost that is not prohibitive. We as- In this work, we focus on the applicability of a 230 GHz sume that a very accurate frequency standard can be pro- space-VLBI array to AGN jet studies. We motivate an ar- vided at reasonable cost. Onboard atomic clocks on each chitecture and possible space-VLBI array from practical element may be the easiest solution, although distributed considerations (Section 2), generate synthetic data (Sec- signals with a round-trip loop may also be feasible. We as- tion 3), and examine the imaging power of such an ar- sume that laser communications links will be able to sup- ray (Section 4). We nd that an array consisting of a port data rates of many gigabits per second. Transferring half dozen or so satellites of modest aperture can provide large amounts of data to the ground may require substan- the fast microarcsecond-scale angular resolution needed to tial onboard data storage and a geosynchronous satellite make next-generation breakthroughs in AGN jet science. acting as a relay. We have been purposefully vague in the preceding para- graph. Other scienti c, industrial, and military applica- 2. Considerations for Designing a Space VLBI Ar- tions are already driving some of the assumed advances. ray Given adequate time and funding, focused e orts could enable major progress in the remaining areas. All of the 2.1. Technical Assumptions required pieces of technology for a space-VLBI 1.3 mm ar- This work focuses on what could be achieved scientif- ray exist, even if cost or performance issues may preclude ically by launching highly capable satellites into several advancing a complete mission today. Furthermore, as will classes of orbits around the Earth. Issues regarding tech- become clearer in Section 2.5, the achievable performance nology and engineering are necessarily beyond the scope of a space-VLBI array depends on multiple parameters of this work, and in any case it is impossible to predict (aperture size, aperture eciency, bandwidth, and system with full accuracy what the landscape will look like in the temperature) of both the space-based and ground-based future. Nevertheless, it is worth specifying a few key tech- elements. Improvements in one of these parameters are nical assumptions to assess whether the concept described interchangeable with improvements in another. in this paper might be feasible within the next 5{10 years. The cost of access to space is decreasing. Rideshare op- 2.2. Timescales portunities are becoming plentiful, with reduced or even In order to produce static images or movies of a source zero marginal launch costs for secondary payloads. Tak- with varying structure, it is desirable to sample the (u; v) ing full advantage of these opportunities will likely require plane before the source structure changes appreciaby. A that space-VLBI payloads t within the size and weight useful characteristic timescale for a black hole source is limits of a small satellite that could be launched from an t = GM=c , the light-crossing time of the gravitational EELV (Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles) Secondary radius. For Sgr A*, whose mass is approximately 4:3 Payload Adapter (ESPA) Grande ring, for instance. As an 10 M , this time is about 20 s. Structures in an ac- added bene t, keeping the payload size small may reduce cretion ow may be bigger than r , and material in the accretion ow moves at subluminal velocities, so a source may e ectively be static over a timescale of a few t . In- It is possible that a large number of additional ground stations deed, Sgr A* is seen to vary across the electromagnetic could enable snapshot imaging of Sgr A*, although the geographical distribution of sites suitable for 230 GHz observing imposes funda- spectrum on timescales of minutes (e.g., Marrone et al., mental limits on a ground-only approach. 2008). https://www.ru.nl/astrophysics/news-agenda/ Other supermassive black holes of interest are much future-high-resolution-radio-interferometry-space/ submitted-abstracts/ (accessed 2019 March 13) more massive and therefore vary on longer timescales. For 2 instance, t  9 hr for M87, assuming a mass of 6:6  ground{ground VLBI baselines or enough elements in low 10 M (Gebhardt et al., 2011). For these sources, visi- Earth orbit (LEO) to ll in the center of the (u; v) plane. bilities obtained over the course of a day are sampling a Sky images are inherently two-dimensional. Previous nearly static source. space-VLBI e orts have focused on placing a single ele- For more distant sources, structural changes are only ment into orbit (Levy et al., 1986; Hirabayashi et al., 1998; relevant if they are on a suciently large angular scale to Kardashev et al., 2013). RadioAstron provides an instruc- be detected. AGN jets often exhibit superluminal appar- tive case: its images often su er from having poor resolu- ent motion, but these sources are farther away, resulting tion orthogonal to the direction of its orbit (e.g., G omez et in a small apparent angular motion on the sky. For in- al., 2016). An imaging array should therefore have at least stance, features in the jet of 3C 279 are seen to move at two elements in high, approximately orthogonal orbits. many times the speed of light (Whitney et al., 1971; Keller- 2.4. Classes of Orbits mann et al., 1974; Cohen et al., 1977, and many others), corresponding to a motion of 1 as in a few days. Such Low Earth orbits range from a few hundred to 2000 km structural changes are evident in early EHT data, which above the ground. Since the mean radius of the Earth is detected small changes in the closure phase even on a trian- approximately 6370 km, satellites in LEO do not signi - gle of stations with a longest baseline of 3{4 G (Lu et al., cantly extend angular resolution beyond what is available 2013). The fractional changes in the data on longer (e.g., from a ground-based array alone. However, LEO orbits space{ground) baselines would, of course, be substantially provide fast baseline coverage. Satellites in LEO circle the larger. Earth in approximately 90 to 120 minutes. LEO{ground It is possible for small portions of a source to vary in and LEO{LEO baselines can quickly ll in the (u; v) plane brightness on even faster timescales. In this case, it may out to  12 G at 1.3 mm. Even for \snapshot" observa- be possible to mitigate the loss in image delity by treat- tions of a few minutes, during which ground{ground base- ing the constant and variable components separately when lines are e ectively stationary in the (u; v) plane, LEO{ calibrating the data, as is sometimes done for connected- ground baselines sweep out substantial arcs. Satellites in element interferometry of Sgr A* (e.g., Marrone et al., LEO may therefore be essential for dynamic imaging of 2007, 2008). Sgr A* (Palumbo et al., 2018). Satellites in LEO are also Thus, with the exception of Sgr A*, nearly all super- helpful for fast imaging of M87, though they are not as massive black hole targets of a millimeter-wavelength space- critical as for Sgr A*, due to the longer timescale of vari- VLBI array can be considered to be static on the timescale ability in M87 (Sec. 2.2). of a day. The orbits of the satellites in a millimeter- With orbits at  6:6 R , satellites in geosynchronous wavelength space-VLBI array should therefore be designed Earth orbit (GEO) provide signi cantly more angular res- to swing through (u; v) space on timescales of approxi- olution than LEO. More than one satellite near GEO or mately one day or less. This argues for the highest ele- Medium Earth orbit (MEO) may be required in order to ment of an Earth-centered space-VLBI array to be near provide approximately equal angular resolution at a wide geosynchronous orbit. range of position angles on the sky. A GEO satellite could serve double duty as the communications link to other 2.3. Baseline Coverage satellites in the array. Satellites in LEO are only visible from a ground station for a small fraction of their orbit, All things being equal, a VLBI array with smaller cov- yet for most of their orbit they have a direct line of sight to erage holes in the (u; v) plane will produce images with a geosynchronous satellite, which in turn is always visible higher delity, since there are fewer missing data points from the ground. for image reconstruction algorithms to have to try to ll Higher orbits provide even greater angular resolution in. The ner angular resolution provided by very long at the expense of slower (u; v) coverage. Very high or- baselines is desirable, but it can be dicult or impossi- bits (e.g., translunar or Sun{Earth L2) may provide in- ble to reconstruct images from long-baseline data without sucient (u; v) coverage to produce a high- delity image data on short and intermediate baselines to ll in the gaps. within the timescale of variation of many sources, with This argues against placing a single satellite in a very high the additional problem that the lack of intermediate-length orbit. baselines would make it very dicult to connect data from The short baselines will be especially important in all the remote space-borne element to the ground array (or but the most compact sources. A baseline of 1 D is ap- satellites near the Earth). Therefore, for the remainder of proximately 10 G at  = 1:3 mm, with a fringe spacing of this work we consider space arrays consisting only of tele- =D  20 as. Almost all AGN jet sources have structure scopes in GEO or lower: GEO or high MEO satellites for on scales larger than this, sometimes into the hundreds or angular resolution, LEO satellites for fast baseline cover- thousands of microarcseconds in extent. Short (< 1 D ) age (for snapshot imaging of Sgr A*) or dense sampling of baselines to reconstruct the large-scale emission will be baselines within about an Earth diameter (for higher im- necessary to make use of longer baselines for the increased age delity of other sources), and ground-based telescopes angular resolution. This argues for the inclusion of either for sensitivity. 3 1 2.5. Aperture and Sensitivity rate of 128{144 Mb s , transmitted back to the ground at radio frequencies (Hirabayashi et al., 1998; Kardashev It can be expensive to build and launch large apertures. et al., 2013). Both of these missions were designed in an Rocket payload fairings will impose a maximum upper size era when this was a typical data rate for terrestrial VLBI. to potential satellites. While we cannot predict at this There are many sensitive ground stations, including time what this size will be many years in the future, it phased ALMA, the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) Al- seems prudent to try to limit the aperture size to a few fonso Serrano in Mexico, the phased SMA in Hawai`i, and meters in diameter. the phased Northern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) The system equivalent ux density (SEFD) of a tele- in France. Any one of these would be likely be sucient scope is related to the geometric area (A), aperture e- to obtain rapid detections to a space aperture. So long ciency ( ), and the system temperature (T ) by A sys as fringes can be found to all telescopes from a sensitive 2kT sys ground station, data on all baselines can be fringe tted SEFD = A and used, even if the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is small in any given interval. D  T A sys 42000 Jy (1); 3 m 0:7 75 K 3. Methods with lower values corresponding to more sensitive tele- scopes. As a point of reference, the system temperature of 3.1. General Approach the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Current studies have created arrays with space-based is approximately 75 K in the lower part of the 230 GHz telescopes that are designed for one particular purpose. band in very dry conditions (Warmels et al., 2018). While For instance, Palumbo (2018) explored an array consist- all current ground-based observatories in the EHT are ca- ing of four telescopes in LEO, optimized for dynamical pable of producing a lower SEFD at high elevation in good imaging. Roelofs et al. (2018) explored a minimal con g- weather, some EHT scans in 2013 with the Submillime- uration of two MEO satellites in a con guration such that ter Telescope (SMT) in Arizona or a single Combined Ar- the orbits slowly evolve over the course of six months to ray for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) image Sgr A*. The uniting theme in these studies is that dish in California had SEFDs near or above 42000 Jy on they have focused on a single scienti c case and identi ed Sgr A* due to a combination of mediocre weather and low a single type of array to address that speci c case. In this source elevation (Johnson et al., 2015). A satellite of mod- paper, we focus on an array con guration that can exibly est aperture can achieve the sensitivity of a signi cantly address multiple science cases. larger aperture on the ground. Building o of the concept of Palumbo (2018), we start The sensitivity of a baseline of two telescopes is given with a LEO array consisting of up to four telescopes, which by provides excellent (u; v) coverage within 10 G at 230 GHz. We add a geosynchronous satellite to signi cantly increase 1 SEFD SEFD 1 2 = ; (2) the resolution in the east-west direction. This single satel- lite can also provide north-south coverage for high-declination where  is the noise,  is the sampling quantization loss sources. To add north-south coverage for the rest of the factor ( 0:88 for 2-bit sampling),  is the bandwidth, sky, we add a satellite in an inclined, eccentric MEO or- and  is the integration time. Thus, all else being equal, bit. Given these constraints, we have chosen satellites the rms noise on a space{ground baseline scales as from among existing unclassi ed NORAD two-line ele- ments (TLEs) available from CelesTrak in order to sim- 1=2 / (A A  ) ; (3) space ground ulate data from satellites in real orbits. The selection of these satellites is quasi-arbitrary, and our results do where A is the area of each aperture. This immediately not appear to be particularly dependent upon the speci c suggests that a cost-e ective strategy to achieve high sen- satellites chosen, which is encouraging for a rideshare con- sitivity is to build modest space apertures that leverage cept. A more detailed trade study of orbital parameters the very sensitive apertures on the ground and to observe would, of course, be necessary before a speci c mission is with a high bandwidth. If the partner station is phased advanced. ALMA with an SEFD of 70 Jy (Fish et al., 2013) and an observing bandwidth of 8 GHz,   2 mJy in one minute 3.2. Imaging to a 42000 Jy space telescope. Even wider bandwidths are Representative model images were selected, and then possible from ground-based telescopes, as demonstrated by simulated data were produced using the ehtim (eht-imaging) the upgraded Submillimeter Array (SMA) system (Primi- library. The ground array was assumed to include the ani et al., 2016). These bandwidths are signi cantly larger than used by previous space VLBI e orts. VSOP and RadioAstron both satellite numbers 07276, 19822, 25635, 27854, 29107, and 43132 typically observe(d) two 16 MHz channels for a total data from https://www.celestrak.com/NORAD/elements 4 observatories that currently observe as part of the EHT: ALMA, the Atacama Path nder Experiment (APEX), the Greenland Telescope (GLT), the James Clark Maxwell Tele- scope (JCMT), the LMT, the IRAM 30-meter telescope on Pico Veleta, the South Pole Telescope (SPT), the SMA, and the SMT. Other ground observatories, NOEMA and the ALMA prototype antenna at Kitt Peak, are currently being upgraded to join the EHT and were therefore in- cluded as well. To reduce the number of data points to be imaged (thereby speeding convergence), we simulate data with = 360 s and B = 4 GHz over a 24-hour period. From equation (3), this is equivalent to  = 90 s with two orthog- onal polarizations, each of B = 8 GHz. Large integration times limit the eld of view that can be imaged, although data can be segmented to much shorter time intervals after fringes are found. Data with SNR less than 3 were agged. Figure 1 illustrates a representative (u; v) coverage that the space array might obtain. The baselines involving at least one ground station (red, black, and blue points) have enough sensitivity to be able to detect sources with as little as a few mJy of correlated ux density. For weak sources, the space{space baselines (green points) may fall below Figure 1: Representative (u; v) coverage obtainable in 24 hr for a the SNR cuto for useful data. Regardless, the space{ source at the declination of M104. Individual points are spaced 90 s apart. The addition of telescopes in MEO/GEO signi cantly ex- space baselines add little (u; v) coverage that cannot be 5 pands the maximum baseline length compared to LEO alone. obtained from space{ground baselines alone . Datasets to image consisted of visibility amplitudes and closure phases. For ground-based stations, absolute visi- 4. Results bility phases are dicult to estimate due to very rapid To demonstrate the power of a full space-VLBI array, variations in tropospheric delays. Space{space baseline we examine three scienti c use cases relevant to super- phases will be uncontaminated by these atmospheric con- massive black holes and AGN jets. Can a full space array tributions, and it is possible that visibility phases will be resolve the black hole shadow in sources other than Sgr A* usable on these baselines directly, along with hybrid map- and M87, and, if so, what is the limit? Can such an array ping techniques to estimate visibility phases on other base- resolve details of the jet launch zone of M87? And can it lines. Nevertheless, for simplicity our reconstructions use bring out the ne details necessary to help understand the closure phases as the only phase information included. collimation and propagation of AGN jets? Images were then reconstructed from the simulated data using the Sparse Modeling Imaging Library for Interferom- 4.1. Resolving Shadows Around Other Black Holes etry (SMILI). In addition to incorporating a sparsity (` - norm minimizing) regularizer, SMILI includes total vari- The two prime targets of the EHT, Sgr A* and M87, ation (TV) and total square variation (TSV) regularizers are the only known black hole sources for which terrestrial for smoothness (Akiyama et al., 2017b; Kuramochi et al., VLBI at 1.3 mm can resolve the shadow around the black 2018). In our simulations, we use both the sparsity and hole. The increased resolution of space VLBI can extend TSV regularizers. Optimal values of the hyperparame- this capability to new sources. ters are determined using a cross-validation approach on Johannsen et al. (2012) originally looked at prospects a ground-truth data set. Images were reconstructed from for obtaining masses of other nearby supermassive black three arrays: a ground-only array (i.e., without any el- holes using VLBI. One of the most promising sources on ements in space), a ground+LEO array, and a full array their list is the Sombrero Galaxy (NGC 4594, M104). The consisting of the ground+LEO array plus one satellite each supermassive black hole in M104 has a mass of 6:6 in equatorial GEO and high-inclination MEO. 10 M at a distance of 9:9 Mpc (Greene et al., 2016), which leads to a predicted shadow diameter of  6:8 as. At longer wavelengths, the emission is seen to be very com- A possibly signi cant exception to this is the baseline between pact, with a slight elongation indicating the presence of a the two MEO/GEO satellites, which samples a di erent area of (u; v) very weak jet (Hada et al., 2013). The authors contrast space. This baseline vector changes very slowly, and it may be possi- M104 with M87, which has a much more powerful radio jet, ble to integrate for   several minutes to obtain robust detections. and note the importance of observing M104 at high angu- lar resolution to determine whether the stark di erence in 5 jet power is due to di erences in the black hole spin, the of AGN have been a subject of active investigation. In par- accretion rate, or other properties of the accretion ow, ticular, after the launch of the Fermi telescope and the ad- going so far as to say that \M104 and M87 are a unique vent of ground Cherenkov telescopes (e.g., HESS, MAGIC, pair for testing this issue because the black hole vicinity is and VERITAS), VLBI has played an important role in actually accessible at a simlar horizon-scale resolution." locating the aring counterpart of high-energy emission Figure 2 illustrates the importance of having telescopes (Marscher et al., 2008). High angular resolution obser- in MEO or GEO orbits to image the black hole region of vations at millimeter VLBI wavelengths have been useful the Sombrero Galaxy. Neither the ground array alone nor for constraining properties of the aring region such as the an array consisting of both ground and LEO telescopes source size (Akiyama et al., 2015). In the context of multi- is sucient to resolve the black hole shadow region. The messenger observations, resolving the detailed structure of shadow is well imaged when MEO/GEO satellites are in- jets will be increasingly important in the next decades, cluded. (We have assumed a static image for these sim- including next-generation Cherenkov telescopes and neu- ulations, but several tracks may be required if the source trino observatories. is in an active state, since t is about an hour for the Increased resolution would also allow AGN jet pro les Sombrero Galaxy.) Simulations demonstrate that the full to be traced closer to the black hole. While radio galaxies space array could resolve a black hole shadow down to often exhibit parabolic collimation pro les near the black approximately 3 as in diameter (Fig. 3), which would hole and a transition to a more conical pro le outside add M104, IC 1459, M84, and perhaps IC 4296 to the list (Asada & Nakamura, 2012; Nagai et al., 2014; Boccardi et of supermassive black holes that are bright enough and al., 2016; Tseng et al., 2016; Giovannini et al., 2018; Hada are predicted to have a suciently large shadow to be re- et al., 2018; Nakahara et al., 2018), quasar jet properties solved (see Johannsen et al. 2012 for mass and distance are less well studied. A study of the 3C 273 jet is sug- estimates). gestive of a similar transition near its Bondi radius, possi- bly indicating that jet collimation processes are universal 4.2. M87 Jet Launch (Akiyama et al., 2018). It has been dicult to obtain enough data to test this hypothesis due to a lack of su- The shadow of M87 is within the reach of the resolution cient resolution. Figure 5 illustrates that a full space-VLBI of a ground-based array alone, and it is probable that the array may be necessary to accurately determine jet colli- EHT will produce successful images of the M87 shadow mation, with lower-resolution arrays possibly providing an within the next few years. Models of M87 suggest that the incorrect qualitative understanding of the collimation near 1.3 mm emission is mainly concentrated near the shadow the core. region (e.g., Broderick & Loeb, 2009; Dexter et al., 2012; Mo scibrodzka et al., 2016), a conclusion supported by early EHT data (Doeleman et al., 2012). In contrast, longer- 5. Discussion wavelength data show a prominent jet extending far away from the location of the black hole (e.g., Walker et al., In this work, we have explored a space-VLBI concept 2018). How this jet is launched is an open question. that includes space{ground baselines. Such an array can Inhomogeneities in the accretion disk and jet may pro- provide fast and/or dense (u; v) coverage with only a few duce useful tracers of the motions and magnetic eld in orbiters. Large apertures on the ground provide a cost- the jet launch region around the black hole. The models e ective way to maximize sensitivity. Our simulations of Mo scibrodzka et al. (2016, 2017) illustrate physically demonstrate that a modest space-VLBI array is sucient plausible emission pro les that might be seen at millime- to make signi cant breakthroughs, including measuring ter wavelengths. Imaging and tracking the evolution of the shadows of a larger sample of supermassive black holes, these substructures may help to distinguish whether the providing detailed images of the jet launch region in M87, observed emission is associated with the jet sheath and and resolving the collimation pro les of a larger collection whether the disk and jet have di erent proton-to-electron of AGN jet sources near the black hole. temperature ratios. A space-VLBI array would provide While many architectural decisions for a space-VLBI greater clarity than is available from ground-based VLBI concept can be postponed, the question of whether to alone (Fig. 4). include space{ground baselines or rely upon only space{ space baselines is fundamental and must be decided early. 4.3. AGN Jet Collimation and Variability Bringing the data back to the ground has some key advan- tages, including much faster (u; v) coverage, better sensi- Higher-resolution, higher- delity imaging would also be tivity, and greater robustness in fringe nding, since a cor- a boon to studies of AGN on spatial scales much greater relator on the ground can more easily handle uncertainties than r . In the last decade, multiwavelength observations in spacecraft orbits and local-oscillator frequencies/timing. An underappreciated advantage of building space{ground VLBI into the architecture is extensibility. For instance, a The very bright source Cen A may also be on this list, although the black hole mass estimate from stellar kinematics is less encour- pair of telescopes that are in identical orbits but for a small aging (Cappellari et al., 2009). 6 10 10 10 10 5 5 5 5 0 0 0 0 5 5 5 5 10 10 10 10 10 5 0 5 10 10 5 0 5 10 10 5 0 5 10 10 5 0 5 10 Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Figure 2: Imaging simulation of the Sombrero Galaxy. Left to right : Model image, reconstruction with the ground array only, with the ground array plus four telescopes in LEO, and with the full space array. The shadow region can be resolved, but only if telescopes in MEO/GEO orbits are included. A linear transfer function from zero to the maximum pixel value, as shown in the colorbar on the right, is used in this and the two subsequent gures. Pixel sizes are automatically selected based on the e ective resolution of the array. 8.4 44.0 26.3 6.3 33.0 19.7 4.2 22.0 13.1 2.1 11.0 6.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 -2.1 -11.0 -6.6 -4.2 -22.0 -13.1 -6.3 -33.0 -19.7 -8.4 -44.0 -26.3 44.0 33.0 22.0 11.0 0.0 -11.0 -22.0 -33.0 -44.0 26.3 19.7 13.1 6.6 0.0 -6.6 -13.1 -19.7 -26.3 8.4 6.3 4.2 2.1 0.0 -2.1 -4.2 -6.3 -8.4 Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) 8.8 44.8 26.9 6.6 33.6 20.1 4.4 22.4 13.4 2.2 11.2 6.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 -2.2 -11.2 -6.7 -4.4 -22.4 -13.4 -6.6 -33.6 -20.1 -8.8 -44.8 -26.9 44.8 33.6 22.4 11.2 0.0 -11.2 -22.4 -33.6 -44.8 26.9 20.1 13.4 6.7 0.0 -6.7 -13.4 -20.1 -26.9 8.8 6.6 4.4 2.2 0.0 -2.2 -4.4 -6.6 -8.8 Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Figure 3: Test to determine the shadow resolution power of space arrays. In the panels from left to right, the model (left panel of Figure 2) was rescaled to have a shadow diameter of 15 as, 9 as, and 3 as. The top row shows reconstructions from the ground+LEO array, which can marginally resolve shadows down to a diameter of 9 as. The bottom row shows reconstructions from the full space array, which can marginally resolve shadows down to 3 as. 100 100 100 100 75 75 75 50 50 50 50 25 25 25 25 0 0 0 0 25 25 25 25 50 50 50 75 75 75 75 100 100 100 100 100 50 0 50 100 100 50 0 50 100 100 50 0 50 100 100 50 0 50 100 Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Figure 4: Left to right : Model of the M87 accretion disk and jet (Mo scibrodzka et al., 2016, 2017) along with reconstructions of simulated data from the ground-only, ground+LEO, and full space-VLBI array. The helical structure, which is barely resolved with LEO satellites, is clearly visible when MEO/GEO satellites are included. Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) 20 20 20 20 0 0 0 0 20 20 20 20 40 40 40 40 60 60 60 60 80 80 80 80 80 60 40 20 0 20 80 60 40 20 0 20 80 60 40 20 0 20 80 60 40 20 0 20 Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Figure 5: Left to right : Model of the Mrk 501 jet based on rescaling the MOJAVE (Monitoring Of Jets in Active galactic nuclei with VLBA Experiments) 15 GHz image (Lister et al., 2018) along with reconstructions of simulated data from the ground-only, ground+LEO, and full space-VLBI array. 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Imaging Black Holes and Jets with a VLBI Array Including Multiple Space-Based Telescopes

Astrophysics , Volume 2019 (1903) – Mar 22, 2019

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Abstract

Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) from the ground at millimeter wavelengths can resolve the black hole shadow around two supermassive black holes, Sagittarius A* and M87. The addition of modest telescopes in space would allow the combined array to produce higher-resolution, higher- delity images of these and other sources. This paper explores the potential bene ts of adding orbital elements to the Event Horizon Telescope. We reconstruct model images using simulated data from arrays including telescopes in di erent orbits. We nd that an array including one telescope near geostationary orbit and one in a high-inclination medium Earth or geosynchronous orbit can succesfully produce high- delity images capable of resolving shadows as small as 3 as in diameter. One such key source, the Sombrero Galaxy, may be important to address questions regarding why some black holes launch powerful jets while others do not. Meanwhile, higher-resolution imaging of the substructure of M87 may clarify how jets are launched in the rst place. The extra resolution provided by space VLBI will also improve studies of the collimation of jets from active galactic nuclei. Keywords: galaxies: jets; techniques: high angular resolution; techniques: interferometric; quasars: supermassive black holes c 2019. This manuscript version is made available Hirabayashi et al., 1998), and RadioAstron (Kardashev under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license et al., 2013). Arrays with two space-borne elements have been proposed before at frequencies up to 43 GHz and 86 GHz (Hong et al., 2004; Murphy et al., 2005). 1. Introduction The EHT is a millimeter-wavelength VLBI array whose primary goal is to image nearby supermassive black holes The angular resolution of an interferometric baseline and jets of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Currently ob- is approximately the observing wavelength divided by the serving at  = 1:3 mm (230 GHz), the fringe spacing (=B, baseline length =B. The choice of observing wavelength where B is the projected baseline length) of the longest is often xed by source properties, and in any case atmo- baselines correspond to an angular resolution . 25 as, spheric absorption imposes site-dependent limits on what which is sucient to resolve the shadow of the supermas- is possible. Many terrestrial arrays using very long base- sive black holes of Sagittarius A* and M87. The EHT is line interferometry (VLBI), such as the Very Long Base- currently upgrading telescopes to perform VLBI at  = line Array (VLBA) or the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), 0:87 mm (345 GHz), which will further improve angular achieve high angular resolution by having telescopes that resolution by a factor of 1.5. are thousands of kilometers apart. Here too, the size of the The EHT has developed imaging algorithms to produce Earth imposes fundamental limits on the longest achiev- superresolved images to make the most out of its data able baseline from the ground. (e.g., Bouman et al., 2016; Chael et al., 2016; Akiyama et Longer baselines are achievable with space-borne ele- al., 2017a,b; Kuramochi et al., 2018). Nevertheless, the ments. Space VLBI has successfully been accomplished at EHT is up against some hard limits. The Earth's atmo- centimeter wavelengths with the Tracking and Data Re- sphere quickly becomes unsuitable for ground-based VLBI lay Satellite System (TDRSS; Levy et al., 1986), Highly at higher frequencies, and existing baselines already ap- Advance Laboratory for Communications and Astronomy proach an Earth diameter. In order to achieve higher an- (HALCA) VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP; gular resolution, it will be necessary to incorporate space- borne elements into VLBI arrays of the future. Corresponding author Adding space-borne antennas to the EHT opens up new Email address: vfish@haystack.mit.edu (Vincent L. Fish) science that is very dicult or impossible from the ground. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Preprint submitted to Advances in Space Research March 25, 2019 arXiv:1903.09539v1 [astro-ph.IM] 22 Mar 2019 Reconstructing reliable movies of Sgr A* is likely to require the cost per satellite, potentially allowing for more satel- fast (u; v) coverage not currently obtainable from Earth- lites to be built and launched. A rideshare strategy argues rotation aperture synthesis (Palumbo et al., 2018). The for choosing classes of orbits with frequent launches (e.g., ability to resolve and image ne-scale structures (smaller LEO and GEO) rather than requiring bespoke orbital pa- than the gravitational radius, r = GM=c ) in the ow rameters. around M87 will help enormously in understanding the Our vision assumes improvements in some space-borne details of how jets are launched. Adding to the EHT one telescope subsystems that we believe to be tractable within or more telescopes near geosynchronous orbit would enable less than a decade. We assume that an aperture of a few detailed study of other black hole sources such as the Som- meters in diameter with appropriate surface accuracy for brero Galaxy, an M87 analogue with a much weaker jet. observations at 1.3 mm can be deployed cheaply. One Space VLBI will also help answer the question of whether promising approach might be to stow the surface within a jet collimation is universal across a wide range of jet power. standard secondary payload volume and unfurl it in space. And, as is clear from the diversity of presentations at the Other approaches may become nancially viable as the in- workshop \The Future of High-Resolution Radio Interfer- creasing number of commercial launch opporunities drive ometry in Space" held in Noordwijk, The Netherlands, in costs down. We assume that stable receivers and signal 2018 , AGN jet science is just one of the many areas where chains with bandwidths of many GHz can provide ade- space VLBI could have a large impact. quate sensitivity at a cost that is not prohibitive. We as- In this work, we focus on the applicability of a 230 GHz sume that a very accurate frequency standard can be pro- space-VLBI array to AGN jet studies. We motivate an ar- vided at reasonable cost. Onboard atomic clocks on each chitecture and possible space-VLBI array from practical element may be the easiest solution, although distributed considerations (Section 2), generate synthetic data (Sec- signals with a round-trip loop may also be feasible. We as- tion 3), and examine the imaging power of such an ar- sume that laser communications links will be able to sup- ray (Section 4). We nd that an array consisting of a port data rates of many gigabits per second. Transferring half dozen or so satellites of modest aperture can provide large amounts of data to the ground may require substan- the fast microarcsecond-scale angular resolution needed to tial onboard data storage and a geosynchronous satellite make next-generation breakthroughs in AGN jet science. acting as a relay. We have been purposefully vague in the preceding para- graph. Other scienti c, industrial, and military applica- 2. Considerations for Designing a Space VLBI Ar- tions are already driving some of the assumed advances. ray Given adequate time and funding, focused e orts could enable major progress in the remaining areas. All of the 2.1. Technical Assumptions required pieces of technology for a space-VLBI 1.3 mm ar- This work focuses on what could be achieved scientif- ray exist, even if cost or performance issues may preclude ically by launching highly capable satellites into several advancing a complete mission today. Furthermore, as will classes of orbits around the Earth. Issues regarding tech- become clearer in Section 2.5, the achievable performance nology and engineering are necessarily beyond the scope of a space-VLBI array depends on multiple parameters of this work, and in any case it is impossible to predict (aperture size, aperture eciency, bandwidth, and system with full accuracy what the landscape will look like in the temperature) of both the space-based and ground-based future. Nevertheless, it is worth specifying a few key tech- elements. Improvements in one of these parameters are nical assumptions to assess whether the concept described interchangeable with improvements in another. in this paper might be feasible within the next 5{10 years. The cost of access to space is decreasing. Rideshare op- 2.2. Timescales portunities are becoming plentiful, with reduced or even In order to produce static images or movies of a source zero marginal launch costs for secondary payloads. Tak- with varying structure, it is desirable to sample the (u; v) ing full advantage of these opportunities will likely require plane before the source structure changes appreciaby. A that space-VLBI payloads t within the size and weight useful characteristic timescale for a black hole source is limits of a small satellite that could be launched from an t = GM=c , the light-crossing time of the gravitational EELV (Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles) Secondary radius. For Sgr A*, whose mass is approximately 4:3 Payload Adapter (ESPA) Grande ring, for instance. As an 10 M , this time is about 20 s. Structures in an ac- added bene t, keeping the payload size small may reduce cretion ow may be bigger than r , and material in the accretion ow moves at subluminal velocities, so a source may e ectively be static over a timescale of a few t . In- It is possible that a large number of additional ground stations deed, Sgr A* is seen to vary across the electromagnetic could enable snapshot imaging of Sgr A*, although the geographical distribution of sites suitable for 230 GHz observing imposes funda- spectrum on timescales of minutes (e.g., Marrone et al., mental limits on a ground-only approach. 2008). https://www.ru.nl/astrophysics/news-agenda/ Other supermassive black holes of interest are much future-high-resolution-radio-interferometry-space/ submitted-abstracts/ (accessed 2019 March 13) more massive and therefore vary on longer timescales. For 2 instance, t  9 hr for M87, assuming a mass of 6:6  ground{ground VLBI baselines or enough elements in low 10 M (Gebhardt et al., 2011). For these sources, visi- Earth orbit (LEO) to ll in the center of the (u; v) plane. bilities obtained over the course of a day are sampling a Sky images are inherently two-dimensional. Previous nearly static source. space-VLBI e orts have focused on placing a single ele- For more distant sources, structural changes are only ment into orbit (Levy et al., 1986; Hirabayashi et al., 1998; relevant if they are on a suciently large angular scale to Kardashev et al., 2013). RadioAstron provides an instruc- be detected. AGN jets often exhibit superluminal appar- tive case: its images often su er from having poor resolu- ent motion, but these sources are farther away, resulting tion orthogonal to the direction of its orbit (e.g., G omez et in a small apparent angular motion on the sky. For in- al., 2016). An imaging array should therefore have at least stance, features in the jet of 3C 279 are seen to move at two elements in high, approximately orthogonal orbits. many times the speed of light (Whitney et al., 1971; Keller- 2.4. Classes of Orbits mann et al., 1974; Cohen et al., 1977, and many others), corresponding to a motion of 1 as in a few days. Such Low Earth orbits range from a few hundred to 2000 km structural changes are evident in early EHT data, which above the ground. Since the mean radius of the Earth is detected small changes in the closure phase even on a trian- approximately 6370 km, satellites in LEO do not signi - gle of stations with a longest baseline of 3{4 G (Lu et al., cantly extend angular resolution beyond what is available 2013). The fractional changes in the data on longer (e.g., from a ground-based array alone. However, LEO orbits space{ground) baselines would, of course, be substantially provide fast baseline coverage. Satellites in LEO circle the larger. Earth in approximately 90 to 120 minutes. LEO{ground It is possible for small portions of a source to vary in and LEO{LEO baselines can quickly ll in the (u; v) plane brightness on even faster timescales. In this case, it may out to  12 G at 1.3 mm. Even for \snapshot" observa- be possible to mitigate the loss in image delity by treat- tions of a few minutes, during which ground{ground base- ing the constant and variable components separately when lines are e ectively stationary in the (u; v) plane, LEO{ calibrating the data, as is sometimes done for connected- ground baselines sweep out substantial arcs. Satellites in element interferometry of Sgr A* (e.g., Marrone et al., LEO may therefore be essential for dynamic imaging of 2007, 2008). Sgr A* (Palumbo et al., 2018). Satellites in LEO are also Thus, with the exception of Sgr A*, nearly all super- helpful for fast imaging of M87, though they are not as massive black hole targets of a millimeter-wavelength space- critical as for Sgr A*, due to the longer timescale of vari- VLBI array can be considered to be static on the timescale ability in M87 (Sec. 2.2). of a day. The orbits of the satellites in a millimeter- With orbits at  6:6 R , satellites in geosynchronous wavelength space-VLBI array should therefore be designed Earth orbit (GEO) provide signi cantly more angular res- to swing through (u; v) space on timescales of approxi- olution than LEO. More than one satellite near GEO or mately one day or less. This argues for the highest ele- Medium Earth orbit (MEO) may be required in order to ment of an Earth-centered space-VLBI array to be near provide approximately equal angular resolution at a wide geosynchronous orbit. range of position angles on the sky. A GEO satellite could serve double duty as the communications link to other 2.3. Baseline Coverage satellites in the array. Satellites in LEO are only visible from a ground station for a small fraction of their orbit, All things being equal, a VLBI array with smaller cov- yet for most of their orbit they have a direct line of sight to erage holes in the (u; v) plane will produce images with a geosynchronous satellite, which in turn is always visible higher delity, since there are fewer missing data points from the ground. for image reconstruction algorithms to have to try to ll Higher orbits provide even greater angular resolution in. The ner angular resolution provided by very long at the expense of slower (u; v) coverage. Very high or- baselines is desirable, but it can be dicult or impossi- bits (e.g., translunar or Sun{Earth L2) may provide in- ble to reconstruct images from long-baseline data without sucient (u; v) coverage to produce a high- delity image data on short and intermediate baselines to ll in the gaps. within the timescale of variation of many sources, with This argues against placing a single satellite in a very high the additional problem that the lack of intermediate-length orbit. baselines would make it very dicult to connect data from The short baselines will be especially important in all the remote space-borne element to the ground array (or but the most compact sources. A baseline of 1 D is ap- satellites near the Earth). Therefore, for the remainder of proximately 10 G at  = 1:3 mm, with a fringe spacing of this work we consider space arrays consisting only of tele- =D  20 as. Almost all AGN jet sources have structure scopes in GEO or lower: GEO or high MEO satellites for on scales larger than this, sometimes into the hundreds or angular resolution, LEO satellites for fast baseline cover- thousands of microarcseconds in extent. Short (< 1 D ) age (for snapshot imaging of Sgr A*) or dense sampling of baselines to reconstruct the large-scale emission will be baselines within about an Earth diameter (for higher im- necessary to make use of longer baselines for the increased age delity of other sources), and ground-based telescopes angular resolution. This argues for the inclusion of either for sensitivity. 3 1 2.5. Aperture and Sensitivity rate of 128{144 Mb s , transmitted back to the ground at radio frequencies (Hirabayashi et al., 1998; Kardashev It can be expensive to build and launch large apertures. et al., 2013). Both of these missions were designed in an Rocket payload fairings will impose a maximum upper size era when this was a typical data rate for terrestrial VLBI. to potential satellites. While we cannot predict at this There are many sensitive ground stations, including time what this size will be many years in the future, it phased ALMA, the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) Al- seems prudent to try to limit the aperture size to a few fonso Serrano in Mexico, the phased SMA in Hawai`i, and meters in diameter. the phased Northern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) The system equivalent ux density (SEFD) of a tele- in France. Any one of these would be likely be sucient scope is related to the geometric area (A), aperture e- to obtain rapid detections to a space aperture. So long ciency ( ), and the system temperature (T ) by A sys as fringes can be found to all telescopes from a sensitive 2kT sys ground station, data on all baselines can be fringe tted SEFD = A and used, even if the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is small in any given interval. D  T A sys 42000 Jy (1); 3 m 0:7 75 K 3. Methods with lower values corresponding to more sensitive tele- scopes. As a point of reference, the system temperature of 3.1. General Approach the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Current studies have created arrays with space-based is approximately 75 K in the lower part of the 230 GHz telescopes that are designed for one particular purpose. band in very dry conditions (Warmels et al., 2018). While For instance, Palumbo (2018) explored an array consist- all current ground-based observatories in the EHT are ca- ing of four telescopes in LEO, optimized for dynamical pable of producing a lower SEFD at high elevation in good imaging. Roelofs et al. (2018) explored a minimal con g- weather, some EHT scans in 2013 with the Submillime- uration of two MEO satellites in a con guration such that ter Telescope (SMT) in Arizona or a single Combined Ar- the orbits slowly evolve over the course of six months to ray for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) image Sgr A*. The uniting theme in these studies is that dish in California had SEFDs near or above 42000 Jy on they have focused on a single scienti c case and identi ed Sgr A* due to a combination of mediocre weather and low a single type of array to address that speci c case. In this source elevation (Johnson et al., 2015). A satellite of mod- paper, we focus on an array con guration that can exibly est aperture can achieve the sensitivity of a signi cantly address multiple science cases. larger aperture on the ground. Building o of the concept of Palumbo (2018), we start The sensitivity of a baseline of two telescopes is given with a LEO array consisting of up to four telescopes, which by provides excellent (u; v) coverage within 10 G at 230 GHz. We add a geosynchronous satellite to signi cantly increase 1 SEFD SEFD 1 2 = ; (2) the resolution in the east-west direction. This single satel- lite can also provide north-south coverage for high-declination where  is the noise,  is the sampling quantization loss sources. To add north-south coverage for the rest of the factor ( 0:88 for 2-bit sampling),  is the bandwidth, sky, we add a satellite in an inclined, eccentric MEO or- and  is the integration time. Thus, all else being equal, bit. Given these constraints, we have chosen satellites the rms noise on a space{ground baseline scales as from among existing unclassi ed NORAD two-line ele- ments (TLEs) available from CelesTrak in order to sim- 1=2 / (A A  ) ; (3) space ground ulate data from satellites in real orbits. The selection of these satellites is quasi-arbitrary, and our results do where A is the area of each aperture. This immediately not appear to be particularly dependent upon the speci c suggests that a cost-e ective strategy to achieve high sen- satellites chosen, which is encouraging for a rideshare con- sitivity is to build modest space apertures that leverage cept. A more detailed trade study of orbital parameters the very sensitive apertures on the ground and to observe would, of course, be necessary before a speci c mission is with a high bandwidth. If the partner station is phased advanced. ALMA with an SEFD of 70 Jy (Fish et al., 2013) and an observing bandwidth of 8 GHz,   2 mJy in one minute 3.2. Imaging to a 42000 Jy space telescope. Even wider bandwidths are Representative model images were selected, and then possible from ground-based telescopes, as demonstrated by simulated data were produced using the ehtim (eht-imaging) the upgraded Submillimeter Array (SMA) system (Primi- library. The ground array was assumed to include the ani et al., 2016). These bandwidths are signi cantly larger than used by previous space VLBI e orts. VSOP and RadioAstron both satellite numbers 07276, 19822, 25635, 27854, 29107, and 43132 typically observe(d) two 16 MHz channels for a total data from https://www.celestrak.com/NORAD/elements 4 observatories that currently observe as part of the EHT: ALMA, the Atacama Path nder Experiment (APEX), the Greenland Telescope (GLT), the James Clark Maxwell Tele- scope (JCMT), the LMT, the IRAM 30-meter telescope on Pico Veleta, the South Pole Telescope (SPT), the SMA, and the SMT. Other ground observatories, NOEMA and the ALMA prototype antenna at Kitt Peak, are currently being upgraded to join the EHT and were therefore in- cluded as well. To reduce the number of data points to be imaged (thereby speeding convergence), we simulate data with = 360 s and B = 4 GHz over a 24-hour period. From equation (3), this is equivalent to  = 90 s with two orthog- onal polarizations, each of B = 8 GHz. Large integration times limit the eld of view that can be imaged, although data can be segmented to much shorter time intervals after fringes are found. Data with SNR less than 3 were agged. Figure 1 illustrates a representative (u; v) coverage that the space array might obtain. The baselines involving at least one ground station (red, black, and blue points) have enough sensitivity to be able to detect sources with as little as a few mJy of correlated ux density. For weak sources, the space{space baselines (green points) may fall below Figure 1: Representative (u; v) coverage obtainable in 24 hr for a the SNR cuto for useful data. Regardless, the space{ source at the declination of M104. Individual points are spaced 90 s apart. The addition of telescopes in MEO/GEO signi cantly ex- space baselines add little (u; v) coverage that cannot be 5 pands the maximum baseline length compared to LEO alone. obtained from space{ground baselines alone . Datasets to image consisted of visibility amplitudes and closure phases. For ground-based stations, absolute visi- 4. Results bility phases are dicult to estimate due to very rapid To demonstrate the power of a full space-VLBI array, variations in tropospheric delays. Space{space baseline we examine three scienti c use cases relevant to super- phases will be uncontaminated by these atmospheric con- massive black holes and AGN jets. Can a full space array tributions, and it is possible that visibility phases will be resolve the black hole shadow in sources other than Sgr A* usable on these baselines directly, along with hybrid map- and M87, and, if so, what is the limit? Can such an array ping techniques to estimate visibility phases on other base- resolve details of the jet launch zone of M87? And can it lines. Nevertheless, for simplicity our reconstructions use bring out the ne details necessary to help understand the closure phases as the only phase information included. collimation and propagation of AGN jets? Images were then reconstructed from the simulated data using the Sparse Modeling Imaging Library for Interferom- 4.1. Resolving Shadows Around Other Black Holes etry (SMILI). In addition to incorporating a sparsity (` - norm minimizing) regularizer, SMILI includes total vari- The two prime targets of the EHT, Sgr A* and M87, ation (TV) and total square variation (TSV) regularizers are the only known black hole sources for which terrestrial for smoothness (Akiyama et al., 2017b; Kuramochi et al., VLBI at 1.3 mm can resolve the shadow around the black 2018). In our simulations, we use both the sparsity and hole. The increased resolution of space VLBI can extend TSV regularizers. Optimal values of the hyperparame- this capability to new sources. ters are determined using a cross-validation approach on Johannsen et al. (2012) originally looked at prospects a ground-truth data set. Images were reconstructed from for obtaining masses of other nearby supermassive black three arrays: a ground-only array (i.e., without any el- holes using VLBI. One of the most promising sources on ements in space), a ground+LEO array, and a full array their list is the Sombrero Galaxy (NGC 4594, M104). The consisting of the ground+LEO array plus one satellite each supermassive black hole in M104 has a mass of 6:6 in equatorial GEO and high-inclination MEO. 10 M at a distance of 9:9 Mpc (Greene et al., 2016), which leads to a predicted shadow diameter of  6:8 as. At longer wavelengths, the emission is seen to be very com- A possibly signi cant exception to this is the baseline between pact, with a slight elongation indicating the presence of a the two MEO/GEO satellites, which samples a di erent area of (u; v) very weak jet (Hada et al., 2013). The authors contrast space. This baseline vector changes very slowly, and it may be possi- M104 with M87, which has a much more powerful radio jet, ble to integrate for   several minutes to obtain robust detections. and note the importance of observing M104 at high angu- lar resolution to determine whether the stark di erence in 5 jet power is due to di erences in the black hole spin, the of AGN have been a subject of active investigation. In par- accretion rate, or other properties of the accretion ow, ticular, after the launch of the Fermi telescope and the ad- going so far as to say that \M104 and M87 are a unique vent of ground Cherenkov telescopes (e.g., HESS, MAGIC, pair for testing this issue because the black hole vicinity is and VERITAS), VLBI has played an important role in actually accessible at a simlar horizon-scale resolution." locating the aring counterpart of high-energy emission Figure 2 illustrates the importance of having telescopes (Marscher et al., 2008). High angular resolution obser- in MEO or GEO orbits to image the black hole region of vations at millimeter VLBI wavelengths have been useful the Sombrero Galaxy. Neither the ground array alone nor for constraining properties of the aring region such as the an array consisting of both ground and LEO telescopes source size (Akiyama et al., 2015). In the context of multi- is sucient to resolve the black hole shadow region. The messenger observations, resolving the detailed structure of shadow is well imaged when MEO/GEO satellites are in- jets will be increasingly important in the next decades, cluded. (We have assumed a static image for these sim- including next-generation Cherenkov telescopes and neu- ulations, but several tracks may be required if the source trino observatories. is in an active state, since t is about an hour for the Increased resolution would also allow AGN jet pro les Sombrero Galaxy.) Simulations demonstrate that the full to be traced closer to the black hole. While radio galaxies space array could resolve a black hole shadow down to often exhibit parabolic collimation pro les near the black approximately 3 as in diameter (Fig. 3), which would hole and a transition to a more conical pro le outside add M104, IC 1459, M84, and perhaps IC 4296 to the list (Asada & Nakamura, 2012; Nagai et al., 2014; Boccardi et of supermassive black holes that are bright enough and al., 2016; Tseng et al., 2016; Giovannini et al., 2018; Hada are predicted to have a suciently large shadow to be re- et al., 2018; Nakahara et al., 2018), quasar jet properties solved (see Johannsen et al. 2012 for mass and distance are less well studied. A study of the 3C 273 jet is sug- estimates). gestive of a similar transition near its Bondi radius, possi- bly indicating that jet collimation processes are universal 4.2. M87 Jet Launch (Akiyama et al., 2018). It has been dicult to obtain enough data to test this hypothesis due to a lack of su- The shadow of M87 is within the reach of the resolution cient resolution. Figure 5 illustrates that a full space-VLBI of a ground-based array alone, and it is probable that the array may be necessary to accurately determine jet colli- EHT will produce successful images of the M87 shadow mation, with lower-resolution arrays possibly providing an within the next few years. Models of M87 suggest that the incorrect qualitative understanding of the collimation near 1.3 mm emission is mainly concentrated near the shadow the core. region (e.g., Broderick & Loeb, 2009; Dexter et al., 2012; Mo scibrodzka et al., 2016), a conclusion supported by early EHT data (Doeleman et al., 2012). In contrast, longer- 5. Discussion wavelength data show a prominent jet extending far away from the location of the black hole (e.g., Walker et al., In this work, we have explored a space-VLBI concept 2018). How this jet is launched is an open question. that includes space{ground baselines. Such an array can Inhomogeneities in the accretion disk and jet may pro- provide fast and/or dense (u; v) coverage with only a few duce useful tracers of the motions and magnetic eld in orbiters. Large apertures on the ground provide a cost- the jet launch region around the black hole. The models e ective way to maximize sensitivity. Our simulations of Mo scibrodzka et al. (2016, 2017) illustrate physically demonstrate that a modest space-VLBI array is sucient plausible emission pro les that might be seen at millime- to make signi cant breakthroughs, including measuring ter wavelengths. Imaging and tracking the evolution of the shadows of a larger sample of supermassive black holes, these substructures may help to distinguish whether the providing detailed images of the jet launch region in M87, observed emission is associated with the jet sheath and and resolving the collimation pro les of a larger collection whether the disk and jet have di erent proton-to-electron of AGN jet sources near the black hole. temperature ratios. A space-VLBI array would provide While many architectural decisions for a space-VLBI greater clarity than is available from ground-based VLBI concept can be postponed, the question of whether to alone (Fig. 4). include space{ground baselines or rely upon only space{ space baselines is fundamental and must be decided early. 4.3. AGN Jet Collimation and Variability Bringing the data back to the ground has some key advan- tages, including much faster (u; v) coverage, better sensi- Higher-resolution, higher- delity imaging would also be tivity, and greater robustness in fringe nding, since a cor- a boon to studies of AGN on spatial scales much greater relator on the ground can more easily handle uncertainties than r . In the last decade, multiwavelength observations in spacecraft orbits and local-oscillator frequencies/timing. An underappreciated advantage of building space{ground VLBI into the architecture is extensibility. For instance, a The very bright source Cen A may also be on this list, although the black hole mass estimate from stellar kinematics is less encour- pair of telescopes that are in identical orbits but for a small aging (Cappellari et al., 2009). 6 10 10 10 10 5 5 5 5 0 0 0 0 5 5 5 5 10 10 10 10 10 5 0 5 10 10 5 0 5 10 10 5 0 5 10 10 5 0 5 10 Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Figure 2: Imaging simulation of the Sombrero Galaxy. Left to right : Model image, reconstruction with the ground array only, with the ground array plus four telescopes in LEO, and with the full space array. The shadow region can be resolved, but only if telescopes in MEO/GEO orbits are included. A linear transfer function from zero to the maximum pixel value, as shown in the colorbar on the right, is used in this and the two subsequent gures. Pixel sizes are automatically selected based on the e ective resolution of the array. 8.4 44.0 26.3 6.3 33.0 19.7 4.2 22.0 13.1 2.1 11.0 6.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 -2.1 -11.0 -6.6 -4.2 -22.0 -13.1 -6.3 -33.0 -19.7 -8.4 -44.0 -26.3 44.0 33.0 22.0 11.0 0.0 -11.0 -22.0 -33.0 -44.0 26.3 19.7 13.1 6.6 0.0 -6.6 -13.1 -19.7 -26.3 8.4 6.3 4.2 2.1 0.0 -2.1 -4.2 -6.3 -8.4 Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) 8.8 44.8 26.9 6.6 33.6 20.1 4.4 22.4 13.4 2.2 11.2 6.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 -2.2 -11.2 -6.7 -4.4 -22.4 -13.4 -6.6 -33.6 -20.1 -8.8 -44.8 -26.9 44.8 33.6 22.4 11.2 0.0 -11.2 -22.4 -33.6 -44.8 26.9 20.1 13.4 6.7 0.0 -6.7 -13.4 -20.1 -26.9 8.8 6.6 4.4 2.2 0.0 -2.2 -4.4 -6.6 -8.8 Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Figure 3: Test to determine the shadow resolution power of space arrays. In the panels from left to right, the model (left panel of Figure 2) was rescaled to have a shadow diameter of 15 as, 9 as, and 3 as. The top row shows reconstructions from the ground+LEO array, which can marginally resolve shadows down to a diameter of 9 as. The bottom row shows reconstructions from the full space array, which can marginally resolve shadows down to 3 as. 100 100 100 100 75 75 75 50 50 50 50 25 25 25 25 0 0 0 0 25 25 25 25 50 50 50 75 75 75 75 100 100 100 100 100 50 0 50 100 100 50 0 50 100 100 50 0 50 100 100 50 0 50 100 Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Figure 4: Left to right : Model of the M87 accretion disk and jet (Mo scibrodzka et al., 2016, 2017) along with reconstructions of simulated data from the ground-only, ground+LEO, and full space-VLBI array. The helical structure, which is barely resolved with LEO satellites, is clearly visible when MEO/GEO satellites are included. Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) Relative Dec ( as) 20 20 20 20 0 0 0 0 20 20 20 20 40 40 40 40 60 60 60 60 80 80 80 80 80 60 40 20 0 20 80 60 40 20 0 20 80 60 40 20 0 20 80 60 40 20 0 20 Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Relative RA ( as) Figure 5: Left to right : Model of the Mrk 501 jet based on rescaling the MOJAVE (Monitoring Of Jets in Active galactic nuclei with VLBA Experiments) 15 GHz image (Lister et al., 2018) along with reconstructions of simulated data from the ground-only, ground+LEO, and full space-VLBI array. 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AstrophysicsarXiv (Cornell University)

Published: Mar 22, 2019

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