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Gaia: the Galaxy in six (and more) dimensions

Gaia: the Galaxy in six (and more) dimensions The ESA cornerstone mission Gaia was successfully launched in 2013, and is now scanning the sky to accurately measure the positions and motions of about two billion point-like sources of 3.V.20.5 mag, with the main goal of reconstructing the 6D phase space structure of the Milky Way. The typical uncertainties in the astrometry will be in the range 30-500 as. The sky will be repeatedly scanned (70 times on average) for ve years or more, adding the time dimension, and the Gaia data are complemented by mmag photometry in three broad bands, plus line-of-sight velocities from medium resolution spectroscopy for brighter stars. This impressive dataset is having a large impact on various areas of astrophysics, from solar system objects to distant quasars, from nearby stars to unresolved galaxies, from binaries and extrasolar planets to light bending experiments. This invited review paper presents an overview of the Gaia mission and describes why, to reach the goal performances in astrometry and to adequately map the Milky Way kinematics, Gaia was also equipped with state-of-the-art photometers and spectrographs, enabling us to explore much more than the 6D phase-space of positions and velocities. Scienti c highlights of the rst two Gaia data releases are brie y presented. Keywords: The Galaxy, Astrometry, Astronomical surveys Corresponding author Email address: elena.pancino@inaf.it (Elena Pancino) Preprint submitted to Advances in Space Research December 20, 2019 arXiv:1912.09233v1 [astro-ph.SR] 19 Dec 2019 1. Introduction Astrometry, one of the oldest branches of astronomy, is the science of measuring the positions and motions of objects on the celestial sphere. Be- sides providing the apparent motion of celestial objects, which is one of the ingredients for stellar kinematics and dynamics, astrometry answers two fun- damental questions of astrophysics. The rst concerns the de nition of a ref- erence system of celestial positions { astronomical coordinates are the most powerful tool to identify individual objects and to combine and compare large catalogues coming from observational surveys. The ICRF (Interna- tional Coordinates Reference Frame, Arias et al., 1995; Fey et al., 2015) is the standard in the eld, based on very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) of compact radio sources. The second ingredient is distance, an elusive but fundamental ingredient, without which it would be impossible to fully under- stand the universe. Astrometry, by measuring parallax { the re ection of the Earth's motion around the Sun { is one of the few available techniques to pro- vide direct estimates of distances, without assumptions on objects properties such as intrinsic luminosity. The more accurate and precise the astrometric measurement, the smaller the parallax that can be accurately measured, the larger the distance that can be reached. Gaia (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2016b), is the ESA cornerstone astro- metric mission, launched in 2013, whose main goal is to provide absolute as- trometry, 100 times more accurate than its extremely successful predecessor (Hipparcos, Perryman et al., 1992) and to target much fainter objects, down to a magnitude of V ' 20.5 mag, thus providing a catalogue of two billion objects, covering the entire sky. The ambition of Gaia is to provide a homo- geneous census of the phase space of positions and motions of as much as 1% of the stars in the Milky Way. Gaia is also equipped with a spectrograph, to measure line-of-sight velocities of millions of stars of various spectral types, down to G ' 16-17 mag . To give an idea of the improvement that Gaia is meant to provide, Figure 1 shows how astrometric measurement uncertain- ties have evolved through time: Gaia's predecessor, Hipparcos, could obtain positions and parallaxes with uncertainties of the order of 1 mas, for 10 stars The Gaia white-light magnitude is not too di erent from the Johnson V magnitude for stars with non-extreme colors. A full set of transformations between the Gaia photometry and widely used photometric systems can be found in Evans et al. (2018). The Gaia photometry is described more in detail in Section 2.2. 2 Figure 1: The improvements of astrometry measurements in the course of the centuries. Dotted lines show the rate of improvement for positions (red dots) and parallaxes (blue circles), while the vertical line shows the enormously accelerated improvement obtained in the last century. Gaia's contribution to the eld brings a further improvement of a few orders of magnitude compared to Hipparcos (see text). Image source: ESA. down to V'12 mag. Gaia, on the other hand, will provide astrometry with uncertainties of the order of 0.01 mas, for 10 stars down to V'21 mag (at the end of the mission). To be able to provide such high quality astrometry, however, Gaia will need also to collect exquisite photometry in three wide bands, which is nec- essary to correct for chromatic e ects on the measurements of object's po- sitions. Gaia will also provide time sampling: on average each object will be observed 70 times over the nominal mission duration of 5 years, to al- low for accurate global astrometry and to break the degeneracy between proper motion and parallax. In substance, Gaia's exquisite astrometry re- quires excellent photometry and spectroscopy, and the full catalogue will be unprecedented in optical astronomy in terms of the number of measured sources, characterized by (quasi-)simultaneous measurements with several di erent techniques. This is one of the reasons why Gaia is bringing a real revolution in many elds of modern astrophysics, from stellar structure and evolution, to the reconstruction of the Milky Way history and present day chemo-dynamical status; from the study of the motion of Solar System ob- 3 ject, to a wealth of data on distant, unresolved galaxies and QSO; from its planet-hunting capabilities, to the experiments of fundamental physics that it will enable. All Gaia released data can be obtained from various sources, like the ESA Gaia archive or the Gaia Partner Data Centers . In this paper, I brie y describe the mission capabilities and performances, and I provide a few examples of the exciting results that have been obtained by the community using Gaia data coming from its rst (DR1, Gaia Collabo- ration et al., 2016a) and second (DR2, Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018a) data releases. The paper is organized as follows: Section 2 presents the spacecraft, onboard instrumentation, and science performances; Section 3 presents the Gaia data releases and their content, and highlights some early results ob- tained with the rst two releases; Section 4 summarizes the main points and concludes with a future outlook. 2. Gaia The idea for an astrometric mission that could improve on Hipparcos dates back to the 80s, and started appearing in international Journals of the eld in 1994 (Lindegren et al., 1994), with an interferometric design that later was abandoned. The mission was formally approved by ESA in 2000, as part of its Horizon 2000 Plus program. Its main scienti c goal is to study the struc- ture, formation and evolution of our galaxy, the Milky way, by studying stars belonging to all its components and to the Local Group (Perryman et al., 2001). In 2006, after the Announcement of Opportunity by ESA, the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) was formed, to take care of all aspects of data treatment and to deliver the data to the community. At about the same time, the contract for the construction of Gaia was granted to Astrium (now Airbus Defence and Space). Launch occurred successfully in December 2013, and the satellite reached very smoothly its Lissajus orbit around L2, the unstable Lagrangian point of the Sun and Earth-Moon sys- tem, where it started its technical and scienti c commissioning phase, and started nominal operations about six months later. The nominal ve years of Gaia observations were completed in July 2019, but the onboard fuel reserve is expected to keep Gaia operational until 2024. After a careful cost-bene t analysis, ESA formally approved the rst mission https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/data-access 4 Figure 2: Left panel: Gaia payload. The two Gaia mirrors are mounted on the paylod torus (top), observing two di erent lines of sight that are focalized through a series of mirrors (M4 and M5 are visbile, in cyan) onto a single focal plane (its back side is visible at the bottom of the gure, see also Figure 3). Right panel: Gaia scanning the sky, by precessing its spin axis around the Sun direction. Images source: ESA. extension of two years, on November 2018. This ensures that Gaia will receive support to operate until at least 2020. Contextually, a preliminary pre-approval of a further two-year extension was given, to be re-examined later, to keep on observing until 2022. The Gaia mission extension is expected to improve positions, parallaxes, photometry, and radial velocities by about 40% and to improve upon proper motions even more. The mission extension will also have a positive e ect on the detection of exoplanets and asteroids as well as on the time-sampling of variable objects . 2.1. Astrometry Like Hipparcos, Gaia is one of the few missions designed to perform global astrometric measurements. To this aim, it is equipped with two telescopes observing two di erent lines of sight, separated by a wide angle { the basic angle of 106.5 deg { and whose light is then combined on a single focal plane (Figure 2, left panel) to allow for the simultaneous measurements of large angular di erences between celestial objects. The satellite scans the whole More information on Gaia can be found in the ocial ESA webpages for the public (http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Gaia) and for scientists (https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/). 5 Figure 3: The Gaia focal plane. Each rectangle represents one CCD. Light passing through di erent instruments is collected by groups of CCDs marked in di erent colors, as anno- tated on the Figure. Thanks to Gaia's continuous sky scanning, celestial objects appear on the focal plane on the left side and travel horizontally across it to exit on the right side. Image source: ESA, Alexander Short. sky by slowly precessing its spin axis (Figure 2, right panel) and by doing so, it passes repeatedly on the same regions of the sky (on average 70 times) each time with a di erent orientation. The large basic angle, the repeated measurements, and the onboard metrology system (Mignard, 2011), provide global astrometric measurements and good control over the systematic un- certainties of the astrometry. Thanks to its design, Gaia can thus de ne its own kinematically non-rotating reference system (Mignard et al., 2016; Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018c), based on more than half a million Quasars, that are in part also observed with VLBI, thus allowing the axes of the reference system to be aligned with the ICRF (Fey et al., 2015). As described more in details by Gaia Collaboration et al. (2016b), the light from the two telescopes reaches the focal plane, where 106 CCDs (Charge- Coupled Devices) gather the light and are read out continously as Gaia scans the sky. From the point of view of the focal plane, thus, it looks as if celestial objects enter the focal plane on one side, travel across it at a speed that carefully matches the read-out speed (about 4 s per CCD), and then exit on the other side. To save telemetry bandwidth, objects are detected on board in the rst two CCD columns (Sky Mapper CCDs, or SM, colored in light blue in Figure 3), and con rmed in the third column: only the charges accumulated 6 in little windows that follow the object on the focal plane are transmitted to the ground. The next set of 62 CCDs, the Astrometric Field (AF, colored in grey in Figure 3) collects photons in white light (300-1100 nm), to allow the PSF (Point Spread Function) modeling and accurate centroiding, that is the basis for the astrometric solution . The complex data processing is described by Lindegren et al. (2016, 2018). Its heart is the Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS). Each time a new chunk of data comes in from the satellite and is preprocessed, AGIS is re-run on all the data available, using its previous solution as a starting point for the new solution. This happens approximately every 6 months. AGIS solves for the satellite attitude and for all ve astrometric parameters: on sky positions ( and ), proper motions ( and  ) and parallax ($). To help pinpointing Gaia's position in the sky, a network of medium-sized telescopes regularly observes it from Earth (the GBOT, Ground-Based Optical Tracking project, Altmann et al., 2014; Buzzoni et al., 2016). This is a novel approach for ESA: Gaia is the rst mission that is tracked from the ground not only with radio tracking and ranging, but also with optical imaging. The volume of AF data processed is of tens of billions of measurements, and every AGIS cycle contains of course more data than the previous one, increasing the computational challenge. The satellite's attitude and Basic Angle monitoring on board and in post-processing from the ground is so accurate and sensitive that thermal changes and micro-meteoroid impacts in the L2 region produce jumps, oscillations, and the so-called micro-clancks, very well visible in the astrometric solution. Thus, they provide an entirely new insight into the space weather conditions at L2. The expected end-of-mission performances of Gaia are presented and up- dated on the ESA webpages . With DR2, that is based on roughly two years of data over the nominal ve, Gaia is already approaching the exquisite qual- ity expected at the faint end. This is because the mission is not optimized for bright stars (V.13 mag), and more work and more data are required to improve the bright end. In spite of the preliminary nature of the released data, DR2 is already spawned numerous new discoveries in the rst few weeks (Section 3). see also https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/astrometric-instrument https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/science-performance 7 Figure 4: Gaia Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, Gaia absolute magnitude M versus G - G BP G color, as a function of the stars tangential velocity (V ), using Gaia DR2 with relative RP T parallax uncertainty better than 10% and low extinction stars (E(B-V)<0.015 mag), to- gether with astrometric and photometric quality lters. The color scale represents the square root of the density of stars. Image source: ESA/Gaia/DPAC, Carine Babusiaux. 2.2. Photometry To obtain the required quality in astrometric measurements, it is necessary to map extremely well the di erential object displacement that occurs in dif- ferent regions of the large Gaia focal plane, depending on the object intrinsic color. In other words, the blue light and the red light emitted by each celes- tial source travel through slightly di erent optical paths and end on sligthly di erent positions on the focal plane. The net result is that cool or reddened stars and galaxies have systematically di erent centroid measurements than hot and blue objects. With Gaia, we aim at 10-500 as uncertainties in the absolute astrom- etry, and the chromaticity e ects cannot be neglected. This is one of the reasons why { besides the white light magnitudes measured on the AF { Gaia is equipped with two low-dispersion spectrographs: the blue and the red (spectro-)photometers (hereafter, BP and RP). They produce spectra with a resolution (R==) varying between 20 and 100, each covering roughly 8 6 half of the optical range covered by Gaia SM and AF images , the BP from 330 to 670 nm and the RP from 620 to 1050 nm. The BP-RP color is obtained by extracting integrated magnitudes from the BP and RP spectra. The obtained three-band photometry of white light, integrated BP and RP magnitudes already in GDR2 contains 1.3 billion sources, down to G ' 21 mag and has internal uncertainties of the order of a few millimagnitudes. This constitutes a problem because none of the exisiting photometric catalogues has comparable uncertainties, and thus one cannot eciently use external catalogues to fully validate Gaia photometry (Evans et al., 2018). The external (absolute) ux calibration is based on an extension of the CALSPEC set of spectro-photometric standard stars (Bohlin, 2014; Pancino et al., 2012), that provides external uncertainties of about 1% or better in ux, i.e., the best that can be done with current technology. The three-band color-magnitude diagram from the latest Gaia release (Figure 4) shows an impressive amount of detail, and has spawned new discoveries even in the relatively old eld of stellar structure and evolution (see section 3). Besides integrated magnitudes and colors, Gaia BP and RP spectra pro- vide a wealth of additional astrophysical information. They can be used { together with the medium-resolution spectra described in the next section { to classify astrophysical objects, for example separating stars from galaxies or quasars. The spectra also provide accurate astrophysical parameters such as surface temperatures and gravities, metallicities, or interstellar reddening and extinction. A preliminary set of astrophysical parameters was provided with Gaia DR2 (Andrae et al., 2018), using solely integrated magnitudes. We expect signi cant improvement in the quantity and quality of the released astrophysical parameters in the upcoming releases. 2.3. Spectroscopy Gaia astrometry is designed to provide ve of the six phase-space dimen- sions { the space of positions and motions { for roughly 2 billion stars: sky position (right ascension and declination, or and ), distance (through par- see https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/iow_20180316 The term integrated magnitude, widely used in the Gaia community, simply means that all photons collected in the white AF passband or in the BP/RP low resolution spectra, or in the RVS spectrograph, are summed and converted to a magnitude scale. For each instrument, respectively, the obtained integrated magnitudes are indicated as G, G , G , and G . BP RP RVS 9 allax, or $), and the on-sky motion (proper motion in and , or  and ). It cannot however provide information on the motion along the line of sight, also called radial velocity (RV hereafter). For this reason, Gaia is equipped with a medium resolution spectrograph that provides line-of-sight velocities based on the Doppler shift: the Radial Velocity Spectrometer or RVS (Cropper et al., 2018). The spectra have a resolution R'11 500 and cover the widely used region around the Calcium IR triplet (846{874 nm), which allows for accurate RV measurements for late type stars. For early type stars, the Paschen lines are well visible in this range and for very cool stars the molecular bands of TiO can be used for RV determination, albeit with lower performances compared to the Calcium triplet. The region is also rich in atomic lines belonging mostly to the iron-peak and -elements, and can thus be used to accurately parametrize stars and to derive their chemical composition. Some di use interstellar bands are also present, for the independent determination of interstellar absorption. The science performances depend on the spectral type and the brightness of the observed stars, where the expected limiting magnitude is brighter than the one of AF, BP, and RP: G '16 mag. For the brigthest stars (G.13{ 14 mag) it is about 1 km/s or less, which is quite competitive with existing RV surveys . For the less favorable cases of very blue and faint stars it can reach 15 km/s or more. All RV measurements are accurately calibrated using a set of more than 1000 RV standard stars (Soubiran et al., 2018). The currently released RV measurements constitute the largest available set of homogeneously and accurately measured RV in the literature to date, with more than 7 million stars in the DR2 catalogue. 2.4. Time coverage and variability The last necessary ingredient to obtain extremely accurate astrometry is time coverage, i.e., repeated observations. One of the reasons why time cov- erage is necessary is the so-called parallax-proper motion degeneracy. The motion of a star on the plane of the sky is a combination of its actual mo- tion (proper motion) with the re ection of the Earth's orbit around the Sun (parallax). If an object is observed for less than one year, the measured (apparent) motion vector cannot be accurately separated into the two com- https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/science-performance 10 Figure 5: Gaia eld-of-view transits for the ve-year Nominal Scanning Law in ICRF coordinates. The Ecliptic plane is within the blue curved strip, while the number of passages is maximum on the two lines at 45 deg from it. Image source: Berry Holl. ponents, while if observations are carried out for at least one full year, one full parallax ellipse will be covered, and the two components will be accurately disentangled. Another important reason is that Gaia is a complex instru- ment, with a scanning law that generally allows to cover the same region of the sky multiple times with di erent observations (Figure 5) . Because the accuracy in position measurements is largest along the scanning direction and the combination of Gaia's spin and spin axis precession provides many observations with a di erent scanning orientation, it is thus possible to re- construct the 2D sources positions much more accurately, at the same time keeping systematic errors under control. Gaia is therefore designed to observe each source on average 70 times over the ve 5 years of its nominal operation timeframe. The RVS instrument, being designed di erently, gathers about 40 di erent observations instead of 70, on average. This opens up a range of time-domain astrophysical stud- ies based on photometry (light-curves), spectroscopy (RV curves), and as- trometry (centroid motions), obtained quasi-simultaneously in case of bright sources (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2019). The repeated observations allow to study periodically varying objects such as variable stars or quasars (Gaia For more details: https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/iow_20120312. 11 Collaboration et al., 2017; Hwang et al., 2019) or transient objects such as no- vae, supernovae, and microlensing events (Wyrzykowski, 2016). In addition repeated observations allow to detect planets through astrometric variabil- ity, opening a discovery window that is complementary to other techniques (Perryman et al., 2014). They also allow to fully model binary stars, which are a fundamental ingredient for understanding the formation and evolution of stars and stellar systems (Eyer et al., 2015): the rst release containing non-single stars measurements will be DR3 (see Section 3.3). 3. Data releases and science highlights Hundreds of scientists and engineers in Europe and in the world have con- tributed a signi cant fraction of their carreers to designing, building, launch- ing, and operating Gaia, but also to process, analyze, validate, and publish its data in a form that the community can use for their scienti c research, for teaching, and for outreach activities and events. Two public data re- leases have taken place so far (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2016a, 2018a), and at least two more are foreseen . Indeed, the analysis of Gaia data in the DPAC is subdivided in 9 di erent Coordination Units (CUs) that take care of various aspects such as: sowftware and database infrastructures, data sim- ulations, astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic processing, time-series analysis of variable and peculiar objects, and the like. Closing the loops of communication, validation, and data exchanges among the CUs smoothly is a slow and careful process of growing complexity. Therefore, each data re- lease presents more data products and improves on the quality of previously released products. 3.1. The rst Gaia data release The rst Gaia data release, in 2016 (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2016a) con- tained: positions and G magnitudes of more than billion sources; the TGAS (Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution) catalogue, obtained by combining Hip- parchos and Gaia positions and thus limited to G'12 mag; and light-curves for a few thousand variable stars at the ecliptic poles. It was thought as a demonstrational release, to show the Gaia mission's potential and to prepare the community for the upcoming releases. It was instead used intensively Ocial release scenario: https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/release. 12 not only to test ideas and algorithms to use in future releases, but also to obtain many new and original scienti c results in di erent research elds. The results were published in more than 1000 refereed papers, that cited the Gaia rst release papers between 2016 and 2018 alone. Many projects were carried out to test the data and methods in view of DR2. The rotation of the Large Magellanic Cloud was studied with 29 TGAS stars (van der Marel and Sahlmann, 2016); a similar study was later carried out with DR2, using 8 million stars, and discovering for the rst time rotation in the Small Magellanic Cloud (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018b). The quality of TGAS parallaxes was compared with various catalogues, and a small bias was found in the comparison with eclipsing binaries and previously published astrometry, of '2.5 mas (Stassun et al., 2017; Jao et al., 2016), while other indicators like variable stars (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2017; Casertano et al., 2017) were found to be in good agreement. Finally, the problem of converting parallaxes into meaningful distances for individual stars was tackled using TGAS data (Astraatmadja and Bailer-Jones, 2016). The modeling of the Milky using the new DR1 and TGAS data, one of the main goals of the Gaia mission, was carried out by various groups. I list here just some of the most cited works: the mass distribution and halo substructure with Gaia, RAVE, and APOGEE was studied in some detail (Helmi et al., 2017; Bonaca et al., 2017); the dynamics of the galactic bar and the Hercules stream were studied by (Monari et al., 2017); the galactic rotation was studied by (Bovy, 2017); and a 3D study of the Orion region revealed an age gradient in the OB-star population (Zari et al., 2017). Gaia DR1 and TGAS data were also used to study Galaxy dynamics and stellar structure and evolution, by compiling catalogues of comoving pairs and wide binaries (Oh et al., 2017; Andrews et al., 2017) or very cool stars (Smart et al., 2017), or by deriving fundamental relations such as the mass-radius relation for white dwarfs (Tremblay et al., 2017), or nally by testing and recalibrating various relations for pulsating variable stars (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2017). Among the many scienti c studies, a few received attention because they presented new results and were covered in various Gaia press releases, Gaia stories, or Images of the Week: (Koposov et al., 2017) discovered two new stellar clusters, one very close to Sirius, and thus dicult to study with more traditional instruments ; the rst supernova discovered by Gaia was Although the discovery of the Sirius star cluster was presented by Koposov et al. 13 published by (Wyrzykowski, 2016) as part of the science alerts program and its ground-based follow-up network; RR Lyrae stars were used to discover a tidal bridge between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (Belokurov et al., 2017). Gaia DR1 was also used to observe new gravitationally lensed Quasars at high redshift (Lemon et al., 2017; Ostrovski et al., 2018). 3.2. The second Gaia data release The second Gaia data release was issued in April 2018, and was a large improvement over the previous one. It was the rst release to include: pure Gaia astrometry down to G ' 21 mag and G G colors for more than BP RP one billion sources; mean RV measurements for more than seven million sources; asteroid astrometry for 14 000 known objects; and astrophysical pa- rameters (surface temperature and interstellar extinction) for approximately 100 million objects. Gaia DR2 data have such exquisite precision, that the internal structure of the data starts to be visibile in the form of small sys- tematic e ects such as a parallax bias of 0.025 mas (ten times smaller than in DR1 TGAS, Lindegren et al., 2018; Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018b), or the G magnitude trend of 4 millimag per magnitude (Evans et al., 2018). These systematic e ects are expected to decrease with each upcoming data release, as more data { with di erent characteristics { are processed and the processing pipelines are progressively re ned. At the time, more than 1800 refereed papers cite the second Gaia data release paper. According to the NASA ADS, the majority of the new publi- cations are related to the elds of Galactic halo and disk studies (see below), but also to solar system studies (Cellino et al., 2007; Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018d), exoplanet and host star characterization (Kervella et al., 2019), char- acterization of variable or binary objects (Ziegler et al., 2018) and of objects with astroseismological data (Berger et al., 2018). Work was done also in the eld of extragalactic studies, for example on Quasars variability (Hwang et al., 2019) or gravitational lensing (Wertz et al., 2019). Gaia DR2 data have even been used to search for a plausible home star for the interstellar object 'Oumuamua (Bailer-Jones et al., 2018), which recently was discovered transiting in the solar system . Summarizing such a huge and diverse body (2017) as entirely new, a simple ADS search showed that the cluster was already known in the past (Auner et al., 1980). Nevertheless, Gaia is the only current instrument that allows to study such cluster in detail. http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/info/press-releases/interstellar/ 14 of literature in a fair and complete way is out of the scope of the present paper, so I will just present a few highlights of galactic and stellar science from the ESA Gaia press releases, in-depth stories, and Images of the Week. On the Milky Way studies front, a lot of work has been done on stellar clusters, including a full census and dynamical characterisation of open clus- ters (with many new discovered clusters, Cantat-Gaudin et al., 2018, 2019) and globular clusters (Vasiliev, 2019), including the internal dynamics and substructure of individual clusters (Franciosini et al., 2018; Bianchini et al., 2018). An impressive study on the distribution of thousands of young clusters and OB association showed that they lie along lamentary structures across the galaxy disk, whose orientation changes systematically with age (Kounkel and Covey, 2019). New streams, kinematic substructures and past accretion events have been found (Helmi et al., 2017; Koppelman et al., 2018), from the inner galaxy to the outer halo, and studies of dwarf galxies in the local group were carried out as well (Fritz et al., 2018). Various tracers were used to further explore the galaxtic structure, such as cepheids to trace the warp of the galactic disk (Ripepi et al., 2019). Even relatively old research elds like stellar structure and evolution re- ceived a boost from Gaia: given the extremely large statistics and high pre- cision of the of Gaia DR2 photometry, a new feature in the CMD of the galaxy was found (Jao et al., 2018), i.e., a gap along the main sequence that was predicted theoretically but never con rmed observationally , caused by the transition of M stars from the fully convective to the partially convective regime. Similarly, the sequence of white dwarfs, now very populous in the Gaia DR2 data, showed for the rst time its detailed substructure, not only the double sequence traced by di erent types of white dwarfs, but also the piling-up of white dwarfs towards the bottom of the cooling sequence, seen in Gaia data for the rst time, and likely caused by internal processes of crystallization (Tremblay et al., 2019). 3.3. Upcoming data releases The third Gaia data release will occur in two stages in 2020 and 2021. The early release, EDR3, will contain new astrometry and integrated photometry based on the rst 34 months of observations. The measurements uncertainties A search a posteriori in other survey data, such as 2MASS, indeed showed that the gap was present, but there was not enough statistics to con rm its reality. 15 in both astrometry and photometry will improve thanks to the increase in the number of observations for each source, and the re nements or the addition of various pipelines to produce the data (for example: crowding treatment, binary stars, and extended objects). This, in turn, will increase the number of sources that pass the quality ltering, bringing both the expected errors and the number of sources closer to the expected end-of-mission performances. Some internal systematics that were present in DR2, such as the parallax bias of about 0.03 mas (Lindegren et al., 2018; Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018b) and the trends seen in photometry of about 4 millmags/mag or the bright blue stars systematics (Evans et al., 2018) are expected to improve signi cantly. The full EDR3 release, expected in 2021, will complement EDR3 with a wealth of additional data products obtained from the same 34 months of data. DR3 will improve incrementally on the quality of all DR2 data prod- ucts (astrometry and integrated photometry will be those of EDR3), but will also include entirely new ones, such as: mean BP/RP spectra, non-single stars catalogues , results for Quasars and extended objects, object classi- cation and parametrization, and an additional data set, Gaia Andromeda Photometric Survey (GAPS), consisting of the photometric time series for all sources located in a 5.5 degree eld centred on the Andromeda galaxy. Expected presumably in 2023, DR4 will be the last release of the nomi- nal ve-year observations period. As such, it will contain all the obtained data, reaching the expected end-of-mission quality, and all connected data products, such as mean and epoch data from all instruments, and results from all pipelines. Finally, as mentioned in the introduction, the Gaia mis- sion extension of two more years has been nally approved and observations are already ongoing, including a scanning law reversal period that will help in breaking the remaining degeneracies in the astrometric solution and will bring understanding of remaining systematic e ects. A further extension of two more years, for Gaia operations until 2022 has also been pre-approved. The on-board fuel reserve is estimated to be sucient to operate Gaia at least until 2024, thus more extensions are in principle possible, and data In particular, a full binary treatment is foreseen for all stars that show evidence of multiplicity, including full orbital solution when possible. The non-single-stars pipelines will be relatively simple in DR3, but as any other processing chain in DPAC (crowding treatment, extended objects, variables, and so on), they will improve and increase in detail and complexity from release to release. 16 releases beyond DR4 are to be expected. 4. Conclusions To achieve the required quality in astrometric measurements, Gaia is also collecting high-quality photometry and spectroscopy, and repeatingly ob- serving two billion point-like sources on the sky. The resulting dataset is huge, preriodically released and availale, to be freely explored not only by professional astronomers, but also by amateurs, outreach professionals, and teachers at all levels. Among the published papers that cite Gaia, a trend has emerged of com- bining Gaia data with large existing datasets like asteroiseismic studies, multiband photometry, or large spectroscopic surveys for the determination of stellar abundance ratios. This trend con rms that astronomy research is progressing towards a multi-dimensional kind of data exploration, that can simultaneously take into account a diversity of astrophysical properties, to gain a deeper insight. This is true both for large data samples, where data mininig and machine learning techniques are employed to statistically decipher the collective behaviour of astrophysical sources prior to physical modelling, or for small data sets, where rare or new objects can be studied in depth. 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Gaia: the Galaxy in six (and more) dimensions

Astrophysics , Volume 2019 (1912) – Dec 19, 2019

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Abstract

The ESA cornerstone mission Gaia was successfully launched in 2013, and is now scanning the sky to accurately measure the positions and motions of about two billion point-like sources of 3.V.20.5 mag, with the main goal of reconstructing the 6D phase space structure of the Milky Way. The typical uncertainties in the astrometry will be in the range 30-500 as. The sky will be repeatedly scanned (70 times on average) for ve years or more, adding the time dimension, and the Gaia data are complemented by mmag photometry in three broad bands, plus line-of-sight velocities from medium resolution spectroscopy for brighter stars. This impressive dataset is having a large impact on various areas of astrophysics, from solar system objects to distant quasars, from nearby stars to unresolved galaxies, from binaries and extrasolar planets to light bending experiments. This invited review paper presents an overview of the Gaia mission and describes why, to reach the goal performances in astrometry and to adequately map the Milky Way kinematics, Gaia was also equipped with state-of-the-art photometers and spectrographs, enabling us to explore much more than the 6D phase-space of positions and velocities. Scienti c highlights of the rst two Gaia data releases are brie y presented. Keywords: The Galaxy, Astrometry, Astronomical surveys Corresponding author Email address: elena.pancino@inaf.it (Elena Pancino) Preprint submitted to Advances in Space Research December 20, 2019 arXiv:1912.09233v1 [astro-ph.SR] 19 Dec 2019 1. Introduction Astrometry, one of the oldest branches of astronomy, is the science of measuring the positions and motions of objects on the celestial sphere. Be- sides providing the apparent motion of celestial objects, which is one of the ingredients for stellar kinematics and dynamics, astrometry answers two fun- damental questions of astrophysics. The rst concerns the de nition of a ref- erence system of celestial positions { astronomical coordinates are the most powerful tool to identify individual objects and to combine and compare large catalogues coming from observational surveys. The ICRF (Interna- tional Coordinates Reference Frame, Arias et al., 1995; Fey et al., 2015) is the standard in the eld, based on very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) of compact radio sources. The second ingredient is distance, an elusive but fundamental ingredient, without which it would be impossible to fully under- stand the universe. Astrometry, by measuring parallax { the re ection of the Earth's motion around the Sun { is one of the few available techniques to pro- vide direct estimates of distances, without assumptions on objects properties such as intrinsic luminosity. The more accurate and precise the astrometric measurement, the smaller the parallax that can be accurately measured, the larger the distance that can be reached. Gaia (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2016b), is the ESA cornerstone astro- metric mission, launched in 2013, whose main goal is to provide absolute as- trometry, 100 times more accurate than its extremely successful predecessor (Hipparcos, Perryman et al., 1992) and to target much fainter objects, down to a magnitude of V ' 20.5 mag, thus providing a catalogue of two billion objects, covering the entire sky. The ambition of Gaia is to provide a homo- geneous census of the phase space of positions and motions of as much as 1% of the stars in the Milky Way. Gaia is also equipped with a spectrograph, to measure line-of-sight velocities of millions of stars of various spectral types, down to G ' 16-17 mag . To give an idea of the improvement that Gaia is meant to provide, Figure 1 shows how astrometric measurement uncertain- ties have evolved through time: Gaia's predecessor, Hipparcos, could obtain positions and parallaxes with uncertainties of the order of 1 mas, for 10 stars The Gaia white-light magnitude is not too di erent from the Johnson V magnitude for stars with non-extreme colors. A full set of transformations between the Gaia photometry and widely used photometric systems can be found in Evans et al. (2018). The Gaia photometry is described more in detail in Section 2.2. 2 Figure 1: The improvements of astrometry measurements in the course of the centuries. Dotted lines show the rate of improvement for positions (red dots) and parallaxes (blue circles), while the vertical line shows the enormously accelerated improvement obtained in the last century. Gaia's contribution to the eld brings a further improvement of a few orders of magnitude compared to Hipparcos (see text). Image source: ESA. down to V'12 mag. Gaia, on the other hand, will provide astrometry with uncertainties of the order of 0.01 mas, for 10 stars down to V'21 mag (at the end of the mission). To be able to provide such high quality astrometry, however, Gaia will need also to collect exquisite photometry in three wide bands, which is nec- essary to correct for chromatic e ects on the measurements of object's po- sitions. Gaia will also provide time sampling: on average each object will be observed 70 times over the nominal mission duration of 5 years, to al- low for accurate global astrometry and to break the degeneracy between proper motion and parallax. In substance, Gaia's exquisite astrometry re- quires excellent photometry and spectroscopy, and the full catalogue will be unprecedented in optical astronomy in terms of the number of measured sources, characterized by (quasi-)simultaneous measurements with several di erent techniques. This is one of the reasons why Gaia is bringing a real revolution in many elds of modern astrophysics, from stellar structure and evolution, to the reconstruction of the Milky Way history and present day chemo-dynamical status; from the study of the motion of Solar System ob- 3 ject, to a wealth of data on distant, unresolved galaxies and QSO; from its planet-hunting capabilities, to the experiments of fundamental physics that it will enable. All Gaia released data can be obtained from various sources, like the ESA Gaia archive or the Gaia Partner Data Centers . In this paper, I brie y describe the mission capabilities and performances, and I provide a few examples of the exciting results that have been obtained by the community using Gaia data coming from its rst (DR1, Gaia Collabo- ration et al., 2016a) and second (DR2, Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018a) data releases. The paper is organized as follows: Section 2 presents the spacecraft, onboard instrumentation, and science performances; Section 3 presents the Gaia data releases and their content, and highlights some early results ob- tained with the rst two releases; Section 4 summarizes the main points and concludes with a future outlook. 2. Gaia The idea for an astrometric mission that could improve on Hipparcos dates back to the 80s, and started appearing in international Journals of the eld in 1994 (Lindegren et al., 1994), with an interferometric design that later was abandoned. The mission was formally approved by ESA in 2000, as part of its Horizon 2000 Plus program. Its main scienti c goal is to study the struc- ture, formation and evolution of our galaxy, the Milky way, by studying stars belonging to all its components and to the Local Group (Perryman et al., 2001). In 2006, after the Announcement of Opportunity by ESA, the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) was formed, to take care of all aspects of data treatment and to deliver the data to the community. At about the same time, the contract for the construction of Gaia was granted to Astrium (now Airbus Defence and Space). Launch occurred successfully in December 2013, and the satellite reached very smoothly its Lissajus orbit around L2, the unstable Lagrangian point of the Sun and Earth-Moon sys- tem, where it started its technical and scienti c commissioning phase, and started nominal operations about six months later. The nominal ve years of Gaia observations were completed in July 2019, but the onboard fuel reserve is expected to keep Gaia operational until 2024. After a careful cost-bene t analysis, ESA formally approved the rst mission https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/data-access 4 Figure 2: Left panel: Gaia payload. The two Gaia mirrors are mounted on the paylod torus (top), observing two di erent lines of sight that are focalized through a series of mirrors (M4 and M5 are visbile, in cyan) onto a single focal plane (its back side is visible at the bottom of the gure, see also Figure 3). Right panel: Gaia scanning the sky, by precessing its spin axis around the Sun direction. Images source: ESA. extension of two years, on November 2018. This ensures that Gaia will receive support to operate until at least 2020. Contextually, a preliminary pre-approval of a further two-year extension was given, to be re-examined later, to keep on observing until 2022. The Gaia mission extension is expected to improve positions, parallaxes, photometry, and radial velocities by about 40% and to improve upon proper motions even more. The mission extension will also have a positive e ect on the detection of exoplanets and asteroids as well as on the time-sampling of variable objects . 2.1. Astrometry Like Hipparcos, Gaia is one of the few missions designed to perform global astrometric measurements. To this aim, it is equipped with two telescopes observing two di erent lines of sight, separated by a wide angle { the basic angle of 106.5 deg { and whose light is then combined on a single focal plane (Figure 2, left panel) to allow for the simultaneous measurements of large angular di erences between celestial objects. The satellite scans the whole More information on Gaia can be found in the ocial ESA webpages for the public (http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Gaia) and for scientists (https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/). 5 Figure 3: The Gaia focal plane. Each rectangle represents one CCD. Light passing through di erent instruments is collected by groups of CCDs marked in di erent colors, as anno- tated on the Figure. Thanks to Gaia's continuous sky scanning, celestial objects appear on the focal plane on the left side and travel horizontally across it to exit on the right side. Image source: ESA, Alexander Short. sky by slowly precessing its spin axis (Figure 2, right panel) and by doing so, it passes repeatedly on the same regions of the sky (on average 70 times) each time with a di erent orientation. The large basic angle, the repeated measurements, and the onboard metrology system (Mignard, 2011), provide global astrometric measurements and good control over the systematic un- certainties of the astrometry. Thanks to its design, Gaia can thus de ne its own kinematically non-rotating reference system (Mignard et al., 2016; Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018c), based on more than half a million Quasars, that are in part also observed with VLBI, thus allowing the axes of the reference system to be aligned with the ICRF (Fey et al., 2015). As described more in details by Gaia Collaboration et al. (2016b), the light from the two telescopes reaches the focal plane, where 106 CCDs (Charge- Coupled Devices) gather the light and are read out continously as Gaia scans the sky. From the point of view of the focal plane, thus, it looks as if celestial objects enter the focal plane on one side, travel across it at a speed that carefully matches the read-out speed (about 4 s per CCD), and then exit on the other side. To save telemetry bandwidth, objects are detected on board in the rst two CCD columns (Sky Mapper CCDs, or SM, colored in light blue in Figure 3), and con rmed in the third column: only the charges accumulated 6 in little windows that follow the object on the focal plane are transmitted to the ground. The next set of 62 CCDs, the Astrometric Field (AF, colored in grey in Figure 3) collects photons in white light (300-1100 nm), to allow the PSF (Point Spread Function) modeling and accurate centroiding, that is the basis for the astrometric solution . The complex data processing is described by Lindegren et al. (2016, 2018). Its heart is the Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS). Each time a new chunk of data comes in from the satellite and is preprocessed, AGIS is re-run on all the data available, using its previous solution as a starting point for the new solution. This happens approximately every 6 months. AGIS solves for the satellite attitude and for all ve astrometric parameters: on sky positions ( and ), proper motions ( and  ) and parallax ($). To help pinpointing Gaia's position in the sky, a network of medium-sized telescopes regularly observes it from Earth (the GBOT, Ground-Based Optical Tracking project, Altmann et al., 2014; Buzzoni et al., 2016). This is a novel approach for ESA: Gaia is the rst mission that is tracked from the ground not only with radio tracking and ranging, but also with optical imaging. The volume of AF data processed is of tens of billions of measurements, and every AGIS cycle contains of course more data than the previous one, increasing the computational challenge. The satellite's attitude and Basic Angle monitoring on board and in post-processing from the ground is so accurate and sensitive that thermal changes and micro-meteoroid impacts in the L2 region produce jumps, oscillations, and the so-called micro-clancks, very well visible in the astrometric solution. Thus, they provide an entirely new insight into the space weather conditions at L2. The expected end-of-mission performances of Gaia are presented and up- dated on the ESA webpages . With DR2, that is based on roughly two years of data over the nominal ve, Gaia is already approaching the exquisite qual- ity expected at the faint end. This is because the mission is not optimized for bright stars (V.13 mag), and more work and more data are required to improve the bright end. In spite of the preliminary nature of the released data, DR2 is already spawned numerous new discoveries in the rst few weeks (Section 3). see also https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/astrometric-instrument https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/science-performance 7 Figure 4: Gaia Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, Gaia absolute magnitude M versus G - G BP G color, as a function of the stars tangential velocity (V ), using Gaia DR2 with relative RP T parallax uncertainty better than 10% and low extinction stars (E(B-V)<0.015 mag), to- gether with astrometric and photometric quality lters. The color scale represents the square root of the density of stars. Image source: ESA/Gaia/DPAC, Carine Babusiaux. 2.2. Photometry To obtain the required quality in astrometric measurements, it is necessary to map extremely well the di erential object displacement that occurs in dif- ferent regions of the large Gaia focal plane, depending on the object intrinsic color. In other words, the blue light and the red light emitted by each celes- tial source travel through slightly di erent optical paths and end on sligthly di erent positions on the focal plane. The net result is that cool or reddened stars and galaxies have systematically di erent centroid measurements than hot and blue objects. With Gaia, we aim at 10-500 as uncertainties in the absolute astrom- etry, and the chromaticity e ects cannot be neglected. This is one of the reasons why { besides the white light magnitudes measured on the AF { Gaia is equipped with two low-dispersion spectrographs: the blue and the red (spectro-)photometers (hereafter, BP and RP). They produce spectra with a resolution (R==) varying between 20 and 100, each covering roughly 8 6 half of the optical range covered by Gaia SM and AF images , the BP from 330 to 670 nm and the RP from 620 to 1050 nm. The BP-RP color is obtained by extracting integrated magnitudes from the BP and RP spectra. The obtained three-band photometry of white light, integrated BP and RP magnitudes already in GDR2 contains 1.3 billion sources, down to G ' 21 mag and has internal uncertainties of the order of a few millimagnitudes. This constitutes a problem because none of the exisiting photometric catalogues has comparable uncertainties, and thus one cannot eciently use external catalogues to fully validate Gaia photometry (Evans et al., 2018). The external (absolute) ux calibration is based on an extension of the CALSPEC set of spectro-photometric standard stars (Bohlin, 2014; Pancino et al., 2012), that provides external uncertainties of about 1% or better in ux, i.e., the best that can be done with current technology. The three-band color-magnitude diagram from the latest Gaia release (Figure 4) shows an impressive amount of detail, and has spawned new discoveries even in the relatively old eld of stellar structure and evolution (see section 3). Besides integrated magnitudes and colors, Gaia BP and RP spectra pro- vide a wealth of additional astrophysical information. They can be used { together with the medium-resolution spectra described in the next section { to classify astrophysical objects, for example separating stars from galaxies or quasars. The spectra also provide accurate astrophysical parameters such as surface temperatures and gravities, metallicities, or interstellar reddening and extinction. A preliminary set of astrophysical parameters was provided with Gaia DR2 (Andrae et al., 2018), using solely integrated magnitudes. We expect signi cant improvement in the quantity and quality of the released astrophysical parameters in the upcoming releases. 2.3. Spectroscopy Gaia astrometry is designed to provide ve of the six phase-space dimen- sions { the space of positions and motions { for roughly 2 billion stars: sky position (right ascension and declination, or and ), distance (through par- see https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/iow_20180316 The term integrated magnitude, widely used in the Gaia community, simply means that all photons collected in the white AF passband or in the BP/RP low resolution spectra, or in the RVS spectrograph, are summed and converted to a magnitude scale. For each instrument, respectively, the obtained integrated magnitudes are indicated as G, G , G , and G . BP RP RVS 9 allax, or $), and the on-sky motion (proper motion in and , or  and ). It cannot however provide information on the motion along the line of sight, also called radial velocity (RV hereafter). For this reason, Gaia is equipped with a medium resolution spectrograph that provides line-of-sight velocities based on the Doppler shift: the Radial Velocity Spectrometer or RVS (Cropper et al., 2018). The spectra have a resolution R'11 500 and cover the widely used region around the Calcium IR triplet (846{874 nm), which allows for accurate RV measurements for late type stars. For early type stars, the Paschen lines are well visible in this range and for very cool stars the molecular bands of TiO can be used for RV determination, albeit with lower performances compared to the Calcium triplet. The region is also rich in atomic lines belonging mostly to the iron-peak and -elements, and can thus be used to accurately parametrize stars and to derive their chemical composition. Some di use interstellar bands are also present, for the independent determination of interstellar absorption. The science performances depend on the spectral type and the brightness of the observed stars, where the expected limiting magnitude is brighter than the one of AF, BP, and RP: G '16 mag. For the brigthest stars (G.13{ 14 mag) it is about 1 km/s or less, which is quite competitive with existing RV surveys . For the less favorable cases of very blue and faint stars it can reach 15 km/s or more. All RV measurements are accurately calibrated using a set of more than 1000 RV standard stars (Soubiran et al., 2018). The currently released RV measurements constitute the largest available set of homogeneously and accurately measured RV in the literature to date, with more than 7 million stars in the DR2 catalogue. 2.4. Time coverage and variability The last necessary ingredient to obtain extremely accurate astrometry is time coverage, i.e., repeated observations. One of the reasons why time cov- erage is necessary is the so-called parallax-proper motion degeneracy. The motion of a star on the plane of the sky is a combination of its actual mo- tion (proper motion) with the re ection of the Earth's orbit around the Sun (parallax). If an object is observed for less than one year, the measured (apparent) motion vector cannot be accurately separated into the two com- https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/science-performance 10 Figure 5: Gaia eld-of-view transits for the ve-year Nominal Scanning Law in ICRF coordinates. The Ecliptic plane is within the blue curved strip, while the number of passages is maximum on the two lines at 45 deg from it. Image source: Berry Holl. ponents, while if observations are carried out for at least one full year, one full parallax ellipse will be covered, and the two components will be accurately disentangled. Another important reason is that Gaia is a complex instru- ment, with a scanning law that generally allows to cover the same region of the sky multiple times with di erent observations (Figure 5) . Because the accuracy in position measurements is largest along the scanning direction and the combination of Gaia's spin and spin axis precession provides many observations with a di erent scanning orientation, it is thus possible to re- construct the 2D sources positions much more accurately, at the same time keeping systematic errors under control. Gaia is therefore designed to observe each source on average 70 times over the ve 5 years of its nominal operation timeframe. The RVS instrument, being designed di erently, gathers about 40 di erent observations instead of 70, on average. This opens up a range of time-domain astrophysical stud- ies based on photometry (light-curves), spectroscopy (RV curves), and as- trometry (centroid motions), obtained quasi-simultaneously in case of bright sources (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2019). The repeated observations allow to study periodically varying objects such as variable stars or quasars (Gaia For more details: https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/iow_20120312. 11 Collaboration et al., 2017; Hwang et al., 2019) or transient objects such as no- vae, supernovae, and microlensing events (Wyrzykowski, 2016). In addition repeated observations allow to detect planets through astrometric variabil- ity, opening a discovery window that is complementary to other techniques (Perryman et al., 2014). They also allow to fully model binary stars, which are a fundamental ingredient for understanding the formation and evolution of stars and stellar systems (Eyer et al., 2015): the rst release containing non-single stars measurements will be DR3 (see Section 3.3). 3. Data releases and science highlights Hundreds of scientists and engineers in Europe and in the world have con- tributed a signi cant fraction of their carreers to designing, building, launch- ing, and operating Gaia, but also to process, analyze, validate, and publish its data in a form that the community can use for their scienti c research, for teaching, and for outreach activities and events. Two public data re- leases have taken place so far (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2016a, 2018a), and at least two more are foreseen . Indeed, the analysis of Gaia data in the DPAC is subdivided in 9 di erent Coordination Units (CUs) that take care of various aspects such as: sowftware and database infrastructures, data sim- ulations, astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic processing, time-series analysis of variable and peculiar objects, and the like. Closing the loops of communication, validation, and data exchanges among the CUs smoothly is a slow and careful process of growing complexity. Therefore, each data re- lease presents more data products and improves on the quality of previously released products. 3.1. The rst Gaia data release The rst Gaia data release, in 2016 (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2016a) con- tained: positions and G magnitudes of more than billion sources; the TGAS (Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution) catalogue, obtained by combining Hip- parchos and Gaia positions and thus limited to G'12 mag; and light-curves for a few thousand variable stars at the ecliptic poles. It was thought as a demonstrational release, to show the Gaia mission's potential and to prepare the community for the upcoming releases. It was instead used intensively Ocial release scenario: https://www.cosmos.esa.int/web/gaia/release. 12 not only to test ideas and algorithms to use in future releases, but also to obtain many new and original scienti c results in di erent research elds. The results were published in more than 1000 refereed papers, that cited the Gaia rst release papers between 2016 and 2018 alone. Many projects were carried out to test the data and methods in view of DR2. The rotation of the Large Magellanic Cloud was studied with 29 TGAS stars (van der Marel and Sahlmann, 2016); a similar study was later carried out with DR2, using 8 million stars, and discovering for the rst time rotation in the Small Magellanic Cloud (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018b). The quality of TGAS parallaxes was compared with various catalogues, and a small bias was found in the comparison with eclipsing binaries and previously published astrometry, of '2.5 mas (Stassun et al., 2017; Jao et al., 2016), while other indicators like variable stars (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2017; Casertano et al., 2017) were found to be in good agreement. Finally, the problem of converting parallaxes into meaningful distances for individual stars was tackled using TGAS data (Astraatmadja and Bailer-Jones, 2016). The modeling of the Milky using the new DR1 and TGAS data, one of the main goals of the Gaia mission, was carried out by various groups. I list here just some of the most cited works: the mass distribution and halo substructure with Gaia, RAVE, and APOGEE was studied in some detail (Helmi et al., 2017; Bonaca et al., 2017); the dynamics of the galactic bar and the Hercules stream were studied by (Monari et al., 2017); the galactic rotation was studied by (Bovy, 2017); and a 3D study of the Orion region revealed an age gradient in the OB-star population (Zari et al., 2017). Gaia DR1 and TGAS data were also used to study Galaxy dynamics and stellar structure and evolution, by compiling catalogues of comoving pairs and wide binaries (Oh et al., 2017; Andrews et al., 2017) or very cool stars (Smart et al., 2017), or by deriving fundamental relations such as the mass-radius relation for white dwarfs (Tremblay et al., 2017), or nally by testing and recalibrating various relations for pulsating variable stars (Gaia Collaboration et al., 2017). Among the many scienti c studies, a few received attention because they presented new results and were covered in various Gaia press releases, Gaia stories, or Images of the Week: (Koposov et al., 2017) discovered two new stellar clusters, one very close to Sirius, and thus dicult to study with more traditional instruments ; the rst supernova discovered by Gaia was Although the discovery of the Sirius star cluster was presented by Koposov et al. 13 published by (Wyrzykowski, 2016) as part of the science alerts program and its ground-based follow-up network; RR Lyrae stars were used to discover a tidal bridge between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (Belokurov et al., 2017). Gaia DR1 was also used to observe new gravitationally lensed Quasars at high redshift (Lemon et al., 2017; Ostrovski et al., 2018). 3.2. The second Gaia data release The second Gaia data release was issued in April 2018, and was a large improvement over the previous one. It was the rst release to include: pure Gaia astrometry down to G ' 21 mag and G G colors for more than BP RP one billion sources; mean RV measurements for more than seven million sources; asteroid astrometry for 14 000 known objects; and astrophysical pa- rameters (surface temperature and interstellar extinction) for approximately 100 million objects. Gaia DR2 data have such exquisite precision, that the internal structure of the data starts to be visibile in the form of small sys- tematic e ects such as a parallax bias of 0.025 mas (ten times smaller than in DR1 TGAS, Lindegren et al., 2018; Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018b), or the G magnitude trend of 4 millimag per magnitude (Evans et al., 2018). These systematic e ects are expected to decrease with each upcoming data release, as more data { with di erent characteristics { are processed and the processing pipelines are progressively re ned. At the time, more than 1800 refereed papers cite the second Gaia data release paper. According to the NASA ADS, the majority of the new publi- cations are related to the elds of Galactic halo and disk studies (see below), but also to solar system studies (Cellino et al., 2007; Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018d), exoplanet and host star characterization (Kervella et al., 2019), char- acterization of variable or binary objects (Ziegler et al., 2018) and of objects with astroseismological data (Berger et al., 2018). Work was done also in the eld of extragalactic studies, for example on Quasars variability (Hwang et al., 2019) or gravitational lensing (Wertz et al., 2019). Gaia DR2 data have even been used to search for a plausible home star for the interstellar object 'Oumuamua (Bailer-Jones et al., 2018), which recently was discovered transiting in the solar system . Summarizing such a huge and diverse body (2017) as entirely new, a simple ADS search showed that the cluster was already known in the past (Auner et al., 1980). Nevertheless, Gaia is the only current instrument that allows to study such cluster in detail. http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/info/press-releases/interstellar/ 14 of literature in a fair and complete way is out of the scope of the present paper, so I will just present a few highlights of galactic and stellar science from the ESA Gaia press releases, in-depth stories, and Images of the Week. On the Milky Way studies front, a lot of work has been done on stellar clusters, including a full census and dynamical characterisation of open clus- ters (with many new discovered clusters, Cantat-Gaudin et al., 2018, 2019) and globular clusters (Vasiliev, 2019), including the internal dynamics and substructure of individual clusters (Franciosini et al., 2018; Bianchini et al., 2018). An impressive study on the distribution of thousands of young clusters and OB association showed that they lie along lamentary structures across the galaxy disk, whose orientation changes systematically with age (Kounkel and Covey, 2019). New streams, kinematic substructures and past accretion events have been found (Helmi et al., 2017; Koppelman et al., 2018), from the inner galaxy to the outer halo, and studies of dwarf galxies in the local group were carried out as well (Fritz et al., 2018). Various tracers were used to further explore the galaxtic structure, such as cepheids to trace the warp of the galactic disk (Ripepi et al., 2019). Even relatively old research elds like stellar structure and evolution re- ceived a boost from Gaia: given the extremely large statistics and high pre- cision of the of Gaia DR2 photometry, a new feature in the CMD of the galaxy was found (Jao et al., 2018), i.e., a gap along the main sequence that was predicted theoretically but never con rmed observationally , caused by the transition of M stars from the fully convective to the partially convective regime. Similarly, the sequence of white dwarfs, now very populous in the Gaia DR2 data, showed for the rst time its detailed substructure, not only the double sequence traced by di erent types of white dwarfs, but also the piling-up of white dwarfs towards the bottom of the cooling sequence, seen in Gaia data for the rst time, and likely caused by internal processes of crystallization (Tremblay et al., 2019). 3.3. Upcoming data releases The third Gaia data release will occur in two stages in 2020 and 2021. The early release, EDR3, will contain new astrometry and integrated photometry based on the rst 34 months of observations. The measurements uncertainties A search a posteriori in other survey data, such as 2MASS, indeed showed that the gap was present, but there was not enough statistics to con rm its reality. 15 in both astrometry and photometry will improve thanks to the increase in the number of observations for each source, and the re nements or the addition of various pipelines to produce the data (for example: crowding treatment, binary stars, and extended objects). This, in turn, will increase the number of sources that pass the quality ltering, bringing both the expected errors and the number of sources closer to the expected end-of-mission performances. Some internal systematics that were present in DR2, such as the parallax bias of about 0.03 mas (Lindegren et al., 2018; Gaia Collaboration et al., 2018b) and the trends seen in photometry of about 4 millmags/mag or the bright blue stars systematics (Evans et al., 2018) are expected to improve signi cantly. The full EDR3 release, expected in 2021, will complement EDR3 with a wealth of additional data products obtained from the same 34 months of data. DR3 will improve incrementally on the quality of all DR2 data prod- ucts (astrometry and integrated photometry will be those of EDR3), but will also include entirely new ones, such as: mean BP/RP spectra, non-single stars catalogues , results for Quasars and extended objects, object classi- cation and parametrization, and an additional data set, Gaia Andromeda Photometric Survey (GAPS), consisting of the photometric time series for all sources located in a 5.5 degree eld centred on the Andromeda galaxy. Expected presumably in 2023, DR4 will be the last release of the nomi- nal ve-year observations period. As such, it will contain all the obtained data, reaching the expected end-of-mission quality, and all connected data products, such as mean and epoch data from all instruments, and results from all pipelines. Finally, as mentioned in the introduction, the Gaia mis- sion extension of two more years has been nally approved and observations are already ongoing, including a scanning law reversal period that will help in breaking the remaining degeneracies in the astrometric solution and will bring understanding of remaining systematic e ects. A further extension of two more years, for Gaia operations until 2022 has also been pre-approved. The on-board fuel reserve is estimated to be sucient to operate Gaia at least until 2024, thus more extensions are in principle possible, and data In particular, a full binary treatment is foreseen for all stars that show evidence of multiplicity, including full orbital solution when possible. The non-single-stars pipelines will be relatively simple in DR3, but as any other processing chain in DPAC (crowding treatment, extended objects, variables, and so on), they will improve and increase in detail and complexity from release to release. 16 releases beyond DR4 are to be expected. 4. Conclusions To achieve the required quality in astrometric measurements, Gaia is also collecting high-quality photometry and spectroscopy, and repeatingly ob- serving two billion point-like sources on the sky. The resulting dataset is huge, preriodically released and availale, to be freely explored not only by professional astronomers, but also by amateurs, outreach professionals, and teachers at all levels. Among the published papers that cite Gaia, a trend has emerged of com- bining Gaia data with large existing datasets like asteroiseismic studies, multiband photometry, or large spectroscopic surveys for the determination of stellar abundance ratios. This trend con rms that astronomy research is progressing towards a multi-dimensional kind of data exploration, that can simultaneously take into account a diversity of astrophysical properties, to gain a deeper insight. This is true both for large data samples, where data mininig and machine learning techniques are employed to statistically decipher the collective behaviour of astrophysical sources prior to physical modelling, or for small data sets, where rare or new objects can be studied in depth. 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Published: Dec 19, 2019

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