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Analysis and Design of Commutation-Based Circulator-Receivers for Integrated Full-Duplex Wireless

Analysis and Design of Commutation-Based Circulator-Receivers for Integrated Full-Duplex Wireless SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 1 Analysis and Design of Commutation-Based Circulator-Receivers for Integrated Full-Duplex Wireless Negar Reiskarimian, Student Member, IEEE, Mahmood Baraani Dastjerdi, Student Member, IEEE, Jin Zhou, Member, IEEE, and Harish Krishnaswamy, Member, IEEE Abstract—Previously, we presented a non-magnetic, non- reciprocal N-path-filter-based circulator-receiver (circ.-RX) ar- chitecture for full-duplex (FD) wireless which merges a commutation-based linear periodically-time-varying (LPTV) non-magnetic circulator with a down-converting mixer and directly provides the baseband (BB) receiver signals at its output, while suppressing the noise contribution of one set of the commutating switches. The architecture also incorporates an on-chip balance network to enhance the transmitter (TX)- receiver (RX) isolation. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the architecture, including a noise analysis and an analysis of the effect of the balance network. The analyses are verified by simulation and measurement results of a 65 nm CMOS Fig. 1: FD N-path-filter-based circulator-receiver conceptual 750 MHz circulator-receiver prototype. The circulator-receiver architecture and block diagram. can handle up to +8 dBm of TX power, with 8 dB noise figure (NF) and 40 dB average isolation over 20 MHz RF bandwidth taneous transmission and reception, while achieving low loss, (BW). In conjunction with digital self-interference (SI) and its low noise, high linearity, especially for TX-side excitations, third-order intermodulation (IM3) cancellation, the FD circ.-RX and high isolation between the TX and the RX. Single-antenna demonstrates 80 dB overall SI suppression for up to +8 dBm TX average output power. The claims are also verified through FD is important to enable FD capability in hand-held devices an FD demonstration where a -50 dBm weak desired received [21], as well as extending it to MIMO applications, such as signal is recovered while transmitting a 0 dBm average-power FD massive MIMO base-stations to reduce the overhead of OFDM-like TX signal. channel state information (CSI) estimation [22]. Previously I. I NTRODUCTION reported single-antenna FD interfaces either use reciprocal electrical-balance duplexers [9]–[11], magnetic circulators [23] HE thousand-fold data capacity increase envisioned in or non-reciprocal active quasi-circulators [17], [24]. Recipro- the next generation of wireless communication networks cal antenna interfaces suffer from a fundamental minimum or ”5G” is expected to be delivered by technology candi- of 3dB loss in the TX-ANT and ANT-RX paths. In electrical dates such as full-duplex wireless and massive multiple-input balance duplexers, the losses can be made asymmetric to favor multiple-output (MIMO) wireless [1], [2]. FD aims to instantly either TX-ANT or RX NF performance [25]. Ferrite circulators double the link capacity in the physical layer by simultane- require the use of magnetic materials which renders them ously transmitting and receiving at the same frequency, as well incompatible with CMOS fabrication, and therefore bulky and as providing other benefits in the higher layers such as better expensive. Active quasi-circulators are limited by the noise spectral efficiency, reducing network and feedback signaling and linearity performance of the active devices. delays, and resolving hidden-node problems to avoid collisions Reciprocity can be broken using temporal modulation, a fact [3]–[6]. recognized decades ago in the microwave community [26], Achieving the 2 throughput gain and the other benefits [27]. More recently, there has been work on non-magnetic mentioned above is contingent upon overcoming several fun- passive non-reciprocal circulators based on spatio-temporal damental challenges associated with FD operation. The first modulation of material properties such as permittivity [28]– is the tremendous amount of self-interference from the trans- [30] and conductivity [7], [31]–[33]. These approaches are mitter at its own receiver. An FD system handling +8 dBm promising since they can theoretically achieve low loss, low of transmit power, with 20 MHz signal bandwidth and 8 dB noise, and high isolation, and can be configured to maximize NF budget, requires almost 100 dB of self-interference can- linearity for TX-side excitations as we have shown before in cellation (SIC) to cancel the TX leakage down to the receiver [7], [8], [34]. However, the practical demonstrations of these noise floor of 93 dBm. This can only be achieved through exciting but nascent approaches currently remain limited in multi-domain SIC at the antenna interface [7]–[13], RF/analog performance, particularly in noise and TX power handling. baseband [8], [12], [14]–[20] and in digital [3], [8]. The second challenge is the implementation of fully- In [7], [8], [34], non-reciprocity is achieved through phase- integrated single-antenna interfaces which can support simul- shifted commutation across a capacitor bank, i.e., within an arXiv:1805.05884v1 [eess.SP] 15 May 2018 SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 2 Fig. 2: A reciprocal antenna interface: (a) matched at the RX port; (b) unmatched at the RX port where RX reflection returns to the ANT port. A non-reciprocal antenna interface: (a) matched at the RX port; (b) unmatched at the RX port but Fig. 3: Circulator-receiver features: (a) noise circulation and preserving ANT matching. (b) isolation-enhancement through a balance network that tracks antenna variations. N-path filter. In [35], we introduced a new FD receiver architecture, namely an N-path-filter-based circ.-RX, which re-purposes the commutation-based non-reciprocal circulator to also perform down-conversion and provides direct access to baseband signals at its output, while maintaining noise performance that is comparable to mixer-first receivers [17], [36]. The resulting circ.-RX architecture has lower power consumption and NF since the antenna interface and mixing functionalities are achieved within the same block, eliminating the additional LNA/LNTA and mixer and their sources of Fig. 4: Simplified model to analyze the effect of balance noise. It also has the additional benefits of allowing the co- impedance on the performance of the circulator using the design of the antenna interface and the RX, and the embedding analytical S-parameters of the N-path filter (for N ! 1) and of TX-RX isolation-enhancing techniques. The enhancement series switch resistances - (a) for TX and ANT excitations, (b) of TX-RX isolation through the embedding of a reconfig- and for noise. urable balance network increases TX power handling, as the TX swing across the N-path switches is reduced, and more isolation is achieved before the first active baseband amplifier. some of the interesting features of an FD system where the This paper expands on [35] by providing additional in- antenna interface and FD receiver are co-designed and co- formation on system requirements and circ.-RX evolution in optimized as a whole. Section II, analyses to quantify the noise performance, effect A. FD Link Requirements of the embedded balance network, and the trade-off between linearity to TX excitations, isolation/balancing range, and TX- Consider an FD system with a TX average output power ANT/ANT-RX insertion loss in Section III, implementation of +8 dBm, signal BW of 20 MHz and NF budget of 8dB. details of the 65 nm CMOS 0:6 0:9 GHz circ.-RX in Section The equivalent half-duplex noise floor is 93 dBm, requiring IV, and a description of the measurement results and an FD >100 dB SIC. Our current system, shown in Fig. 1, is capable demonstration in Sections V and VI. Finally, Section VII of providing about +80 dB of SIC across antenna and digital concludes the paper. domains, as is discussed later in Section V. Additionally, we have previously reported in [8] the feasibility of BB SIC which II. FD S YSTEM REQUIREMENTS AND can provide an additional 20 dB cancellation. CIRCULATOR-R ECEIVER EVOLUTION Assuming a required SNR of 15 dB, 2.5 dBi TX and As mentioned earlier, we have shown that LPTV circuits RX dipole antenna gain, implementation losses of 5 dB, such as N-path filters enable the achievement of passive non- 10 dB margin for signal fading, and 5 dB (3) sensitivity reciprocity without the use of magnetic materials, and the degradation due to the residual SI and its IM3, the link budget integration of circulators in CMOS [7], [8]. This opens new of 8 dBm+5 dBi(93 dBm+5 dB+15 dB)5 dB10 dB = opportunities for the design of fully-integrated FD transceivers 71 dB translates to a transmission distance of 100 meters where the transceiver is co-designed with the antenna interface. at a frequency of 750 MHz, which begins to approach the In this section, we define the FD link requirements and discuss requirements for small-cell FD communication. SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 3 Detailed discussions of linearity requirements for such FD transceivers have been presented previously in [8]. A higher circulator isolation relaxes both the ADC dynamic range and the SI-canceling RX effective IIP3. Additionally, in our circulator architecture, increasing the isolation from TX to RX translates to lower voltage swings on the switches of the non- reciprocal element, which enhances the circulator linearity and transmitter power handling as well. B. RX Matching in Non-Reciprocal Antenna Interfaces Integrated receivers are typically designed to have a 50 input impedance to provide matching for the conventional Fig. 5: Analysis and simulation results of the ideal circ.-RX reciprocal antenna interfaces that precede them, such as SAW shown in Fig. 4(a), (a) without and (b) with the balance net- duplexers and filters. Matching is necessary to obtain best work across frequency for V = 2 V . The analysis is shown in;tx filtering performance from the duplexer or filter. Additionally, with markers while the lines represent simulations across any mismatch at the receiver port causes a reflection which frequency. Z = 50 , R = 3:5 and Z = 50 ant sw ant travels back to the antenna due to reciprocity and causes undesired ANT re-radiation (Figs. 2(a)-(b)). The need to simultaneously achieve input matching to 50 and noise matching for low noise performance, particularly over wide bandwidths, is the fundamental challenge of LNA/LNTA de- sign. Our FD receiver in [8] followed a similar conventional design methodology, where the integrated circulator and the subsequent receiver were both designed to provide a 50 impedance at the RX port. However, in the case of non- reciprocal antenna interfaces such as circulators, the receiver Fig. 6: Analysis of the effect of balance network on the ideal reflection circulates away from the ANT and is absorbed at circ.-RX: gyrator voltage V , representing the BB nodes, as the TX port (Fig. 2(c)-(d)). Hence, the Z value shown in rx a function of the balance resistance (a) for a V = 2 V in;tx Fig. 2(d) does not need to be 50 . It can be shown that TX excitation in Fig. 4(a) (V = 0 V ), and (b) for a in;ant increasing Z increases the voltage gain from ANT to the RX, rx V = 2 V ANT excitation in Fig. 4(a) (V = 0 V ). in;ant in;tx and for the case of a high impedance RX interface (Z ! 1), rx Z = 50 and R = 3:5 ant sw the voltage gain is maximized to 6 dB for an ideal circulator. 2V ant jV j = j j; for Z ! 1 : jV j = j2V j: (1) rx rx rx ant Recall that in a passive non-return-to-zero (NRZ) mixer, we 1 + rx have [38]: I 2 sin(D) It is worth pointing out that a non-reciprocal antenna BB;1path = : (2) interface can provide additional benefits such as lower LO I  2D RF;in and harmonic re-radiation at the ANT port, since these signals where I and I are the currents flowing into one BB1path RF;in circulate away from the antenna as well. of the baseband paths and from the RF source, respectively. As an example, for an 8-path NRZ mixer with D = 12:5%, BB1path 2 C. Embedded Down-Conversion and Noise Circulation = 0:22 dB, compared to 20log( ) = 3:92 dB RF;in in a 2-path mixer. In other words, similar to the case of the A conceptual architecture and block diagram of the NRZ mixer, by having a higher number of paths in the N- circulator-receiver are presented in Fig. 1. The circulator path filter, N , with lower duty cycle, D = , the RF-to- consists of a non-reciprocal LPTV gyrator built using an N- IF loss is improved since the fundamental component of the path filter [37], combined with three transmission line sections Fourier series for each LO waveform is stronger. Subsequent of an overall length of 3=4 at the operation frequency [7], recombination of different phases to create the I/Q signal [8]. As with all N-path filters, the non-reciprocal element can provide an effective RF-to-IF voltage gain. For example, can also be viewed as a mixer-low pass filter (LPF)-mixer combining the 8 phases for 3rd and 5th harmonic rejec- structure with phase-shifted clocks. In such a structure, it can 1 1 p p tion with 1; ; 0; weights for 0 /180 , 45 /225 , be seen intuitively that any RF signal appearing on Z is rx 2 2 90 /270 and 135 /315 phases results in an additional 12 dB down-converted and low-pass-filtered by the BB capacitors. recombination voltage gain. In other words, the circulator structure inherently includes a mixer-first receiver, and the BB signals captured on the BB An additional interesting behavior in the circ.-RX is noise capacitors can be used for further BB processing. Importantly, circulation. As we will show in Section III, the noise of the isolation continues to be seen between the TX port and the RX-side switches contribute mainly to the RX NF while the N-path filter BB nodes. noise of the TX-side switches circulates away. Hence, the SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 4 Fig. 7: Balance network structure used in simulations [10]. Fig. 9: (a) Noise transfer functions based on (11) and (b) theoretical NF of the circulator-receiver in the presence of the balance network. Fig. 8: Simulated (a) TX-BB isolation and (b) ANT-BB gain of the circulator receiver. Simulations are run on the extracted post-layout schematics of the circulator-receiver, including wirebond inductance and package parasitics, with the LC ladder-based balance network (inductor Q=20) model shown Fig. 10: Simulated NF of the circulator-receiver with and in Fig. 7. without the balance network optimized for 40 dB average isolation. The settings are similar to those of the simulation results shown in Fig. 8. NF of the circ.-RX is theoretically as low as that of tradi- tional mixer-first RXs despite the additional set of switches (Fig. 3(a)). III. ANALYSIS OF I NTEGRATED COMMUTATION-BASED CIRCULATOR-R ECEIVER PERFORMANCE M ETRICS A. Effect of the Balance Network In [8], we demonstrated a simplified method of analyzing D. Enhancing Circulator Isolation the N-path-filter-based circulator, by using the fundamental- to-fundamental S parameters of the N-path filter as a sim- The TX-to-RX isolation in any three-port shared-antenna plified model (ignoring harmonic conversion effects) along interface is limited to the quality of matching at the antenna with conventional microwave circuit analysis techniques for port. In a practical system, antenna matching depends heavily the overall structure. Using the same method, a simplified on environmental reflections. As a result, antenna tuners model for analyzing the circulator-receiver in the presence of are necessary to maintain TX-to-RX isolation across ANT the balance network is shown in Fig. 4(a). The N-path filter variations. If placed at the antenna port, the tuner should be is modeled using an ideal gyrator (assuming a large number as linear as the antenna interface itself for TX signals. In of paths N ) and the effect of switch resistance is captured addition, parasitics within the circulator itself can limit the through two series resistances with the gyrator element. isolation achieved. Inspired by the concept of the balance For an excitation at the TX, V in Fig. 4, the voltages in;tx network in electrical-balance duplexers [10], we have found at various nodes within the circulator can be found as: that incorporating a tunable impedance on the TX side of Z 1 the N-path filter, as shown in Fig. 3(b), can enhance TX- V = jV (3) ant in;tx Z Z R 0 0 sw RX isolation. In essence, the tunable impedance creates a 2 + 1 + R Z sw ant reflection that cancels out the reflected TX signal leaking to the BB nodes. It is also notable that in this work, the balance Z Z 0 0 2 + 1 network is placed at a low-voltage-swing node with respect R Z sw ant V = jV      (4) bal in;tx to the TX, hence maintaining the linearity benefits of the Z Z Z 0 0 0 1 + 2 + 1 + Z R Z bal sw ant circulator. However, there exists a trade-off between linearity, isolation, and loss, as will be discussed in the following Z Z Z 0 0 0 section. In this work, we have prioritized linearity and TX 1 + 1 Z R Z bal sw ant power handling, and therefore the balance network is mainly V = jV = jV 1 2 in;tx Z Z Z 0 0 0 1 + 2 + 1 + effective in combating the effect of circuit parasitics, rather Z R Z bal sw ant than handling large ANT variations. (5) SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 5 Fig. 13: The SMD CLC-based ANT matching network used on the PCB to compensate for parasitics and achieve a reasonable nominal TX-to-RX isolation. Z R Z 0 sw ant Z = (7) bal R Z + Z (Z Z ) sw ant 0 0 ant Fig. 11: Block diagram and schematic of the implemented 65 nm CMOS FD circulator-RX with integrated circulator and Various important points can be deduced from the equations balancing impedance. above. Firstly, Z becomes 0 when R is 0. This is bal sw representative of the fact that when R is 0, the gyrator is sw ideal, which means that if balancing has been accomplished and V is 0, then V is 0 as well. This would render a shunt 1 bal impedance at V ineffectual. Therefore, while placing the bal balancing impedance at V leads to linearity benefits due bal to the low swing at that node for TX excitations, it limits the utility of the balancing impedance to the compensation of parasitics within the circulator and minor ANT impedance variations. For R 6= 0, for Z = 50 , the required Z sw ant bal that results in perfect isolation is also 50 . Fig. 5 shows the results of our analysis at the center frequency as well as simulations across frequency using Cadence for the ideal circuit analyzed above without the balance network and with the addition of the balance network for an excitation at the TX port. As can be seen, without the balance network, in the Fig. 12: Chip microphotograph of the 65 nm CMOS full- presence of finite R , perfect isolation is seen at V but there duplex circulator-receiver. sw rx is finite voltage swing at V and V . However, by tuning 1 BAL the balance network according to Eq. (7) (i.e. to 50 ), the TX leakage is cancelled at the gyrator node V . Secondly, the TX- to-ANT loss in this case is largely not affected by the balance 2Z Z Z 0 0 0 + 1 Z R Z bal sw ant impedance Z , and only depends on the R and Z . This bal sw ant V = V (6) rx in;tx Z Z Z 0 0 0 is another expected benefit of placing the balancing impedance 1 + 2 + 1 + Z R Z bal sw ant at a node which has low swing for TX signals. Thirdly, as where V is the voltage at the antenna port, V and V are an example after balancing, V is -23 dB below V for ant rx bal bal tx the voltages at the right and left sides of the simplified non- R = 3:5 and Z = 50 , indicating the extent to which sw ant reciprocal N-path filter in Fig. 4(a), and V and V are the 1 2 the power handling requirements on the balance network are voltages at the ideal gyrator ports (essentially the BB nodes, relaxed. but without the frequency translation effect). This analysis Similarly, for an excitation at the ANT port, V , the in;ant in its current form is only valid at the center frequency of various voltages are: operation. However, an approach similar to [8] can be used to model the variation of the transmission lines’ response Z Z 1 Z 0 0 0 + 1 + Z R 2 Z ant sw bal across frequency, as well as that of the N-path filter. Due to V = jV = 2V 1 2 in;ant Z Z Z the complexity of the equations, here we opted to limit the 0 0 0 1 + 2 + 1 + Z R Z bal sw ant analysis to the center frequency and use Cadence PSS+PAC (8) simulations to verify our results and show the performance across frequency. From Eq. (5), by setting V to 0, a formula for the desired Z Z 1 0 0 Z R ant sw Z can be derived which nulls the TX leakage at the gyrator bal V = 2V (9) bal in;ant Z Z Z 0 0 0 as follows: 1 + 2 + 1 + Z R Z bal sw ant SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 6 Fig. 14: (a) Circulator TX-to-ANT S-parameter measurements for 750 MHz clock frequency. (b) Measured TX-to-ANT loss at the center frequency as the clock frequency is tuned. Phase tuning is used at each frequency to ensure minimum loss. The black/red curves are without/with the SMD-based ANT matching network. (c) Measured IB TX-to-ANT IIP3. Z Z Z 0 0 0 + 1 + Z R Z ant sw bal V = 2V      (10) rx in;ant Z Z Z 0 0 0 1 + 2 + 1 + Z R Z bal sw ant Fig. 6 shows the trade-off between TX-BB isolation and ANT-RX loss by plotting V using the equations above for both TX and ANT excitations and different values of the balancing resistance (Z = 50 and R = 3:5 ). It can ant sw be seen that unlike the previous case, the ANT-to-gyrator loss increases with a lowering of the magnitude of Z . Therefore, bal there exists a trade-off between TX-BB isolation and ANT-BB loss using this balancing scheme. The aforementioned approximate analysis captures the ba- sics of how the balancing network functions in the circ.- RX, and shows how it can compensate for switch resistance parasitics. To verify this intuitive understanding for other Fig. 15: Measured circulator-receiver (a) conversion gain, (b) types of parasitics, we have simulated our circ.-RX, along IIP3, (c) small-signal TX-to-BB isolation for -40 dBm TX with an LC ladder-based balance network model as used power and (d) NF. The balance network is not engaged in in [10], also shown in Fig. 7. This impedance network can these measurements. provide orthogonal impedance tunability just by varying the capacitor values. The inductors are fixed with a Q of 20. The circulator-receiver contains extracted layout parasitics, overall noise voltage at the gyrator is shown in Eq. (11) wirebond inductance and package parasitics. Fig. 8 shows the (assuming equal switch resistance on both sides of the gy- ANT-to-BB gain and the TX-to-BB isolation with and without rator). Where is the reflection coefficient of the balance bal the balance network, assuming 50 antenna impedance. As network, V = 4KTZ , V = 4KTR (i = 1; 2) and n;ant 0 n;i sw;i mentioned earlier, the balancing network is being used to V = 4KT:Re(Z ). This results in an equivalent noise n;bal bal compensate for layout parasitics, wirebond inductance and figure as in Eq. (12). package parasitics. More than 40dB average isolation can be It should be mentioned that Eq. (12) only captures the noise achieved over 20MHz RF BW with a 2.5 dB degradation in of the circulator alone and does not include the noise of the the ANT-RX loss. In our implementation, discussed later in following BB circuitry. Additionally, the noise equations are this paper, we have implemented a balance network consisting all derived for Z = Z , but can be modified to include ant 0 only of tunable capacitors and resistors, thanks to an SMD the effect of varying antenna impedance. Since we are not CLC-based fixed ANT tuning network incorporated on the working with large ANT variations in this work, we have used printed circuit board (PCB) performing a minor transformation the nominal antenna impedance for simplicity here. (VSWR=1.2). From these equations, it can be seen that the noise of the left-hand-side switches contributes differently to the noise B. Noise Circulation voltage at the gyrator than the noise from the antenna and Here, we derive equations for the noise transfer function the right-hand-side switches. Assuming that R is relatively sw of the switch noise sources as well as the balance network. small compared to Z , it can be seen from (11) that the The circuit diagram for noise analysis is shown in Fig. 4(b) noise from the left-hand-side switches vanishes at the gyrator where the various noise sources are highlighted in red. The node when there’s no balance network. In the presence of the SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 7 ! ! ! 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 bal bal bal 2 2 2 2 2 2 V = V = V 1 + + V 1 + V 1 + + V (1 ) (11) bal 1 2 n;ant n;1 n;2 n;bal R R R sw sw sw 4 4 4 4 1 + 1 + 1 + Z Z Z 0 0 0 ! ! 2 2 R R sw sw 1 + (1 + )(1 ) R bal R Re(Z ) bal sw sw Z bal Z 0 0 F = 1 + + + : (12) R R sw sw Z Z Z 0 1 + + 0 0 1 + + bal bal Z Z 0 0 Fig. 17: Measured ANT-to-RX-BB gain compression of a weak desired signal with and without balance network tuning Fig. 16: (a) Measured small and large signal TX-to-BB isola- versus varying TX output power level. tion after engaging the balance network. The balance network is reconfigured to maintain isolation for each TX power level. (b) Measured impact of the balance network on RX NF in the FD mode. balance network, the noise transfer functions from the switches depend on the network’s reflection coefficient. Fig. 9 shows the noise transfer functions and the NF calculated above as a func- tion of the balance network impedance for R = 3:5 (no sw other post-layout parasitics included). It should be mentioned that this NF plot is the worst case scenario, assuming that the balance network is completely resistive. As the balance network impedance becomes smaller, the noise contribution Fig. 18: (a) Nonlinear tapped delay line used for digital SIC, from the left-hand-side switches and the balance network and (b) measured two-tone TX test tracking the SI and its IM3 increases. For the optimal isolation (Z = 50 , as calculated bal distortion at the RX BB output with SI suppression across earlier) , the NF degrades by about 3 dB. This shows the antenna and digital domains. trade-off between the TX-to-BB isolation and RX NF. Fig. 10 shows NF simulations of the circ.-RX for Z = 50 ant with and without the balance network compensating for post- layout and package parasitics. The overall NF is degraded by around 2.5 dB to 4dB. Our measured NF is higher due capacitance of each path is 16 pF. Switch resistance for each to the additional noise contributions from the BB amplifiers of the sixteen transistors is around 3.5 . The sources/drains and the clock circuitry. An interesting future expansion of this of switches are biased at 1.2 V and are DC coupled to the noise analysis is to analyze the effect of phase noise on the BB amplifiers (which run off a 2.4 V supply as is discussed circulator, as has recently been done for N-path filters in [39]. later). The gates of the switches are AC coupled to the buffers and are biased at 1.35 V (DC level of a 12.5% pulse swinging IV. IMPLEMENTATION from 1.2 V - 2.4 V). The balance network is designed using a parallel resistive bank (6 bits) and a parallel capacitive bank The block diagram and schematic of the 65 nm CMOS FD (5 bits). More complex balance networks as demonstrated circulator-RX is shown in Fig. 11. in [10] can be used to increase the range of balancing that can be performed. An input clock at 4 times the operating A. Integrated Circulator frequency provides eight output phases in a Johnson-counter- The circulator was designed for tunable operation around based divide-by-4 block. Clock phase-shifting is performed for 750 MHz in 65 nm CMOS technology. The line is miniatur- one set of switches prior to division using multiplexed digital ized using three CLC sections implemented with on-chip MiM delay cells with analog varactor-based fine-tuning to cover a capacitors and off-chip air-core 8.9 nH inductors (0806SQ range of 76 to 78 around the nominal phase setting at from Coilcraft, Q >100). The N-path filter uses 8-paths to 750 MHz based on schematic-level simulations at the typical increase the ANT-RX BB recombination gain and achieve corner. Simulations also reveal that in the worst-case (slow- harmonic cancellation for the 3rd and 5th harmonics. The slow corner) the clock path degrades the NF by about 0.25 dB. SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 8 the G cells. The overall harmonic rejection of the circulator- receiver is expected to be more, due to the band-limited nature of the circulator transmission lines implemented in this work. V. M EASUREMENT RESULTS The chip microphotograph of the 65 nm CMOS circulator- receiver is shown in Fig. 12. It has an active area of 0.94 mm and is mounted in a 40-pin QFN package. An SMD CLC- based fixed ANT tuning network as shown in Fig. 13 has been incorporated on the printed circuit board (PCB) performing a minor transformation (VSWR=1.2) to compensate for QFN parasitics and achieve a reasonable nominal TX-to-BB isola- tion when the balance network is off. A. Integrated Circulator The measured two-port TX-to-ANT S-parameters of the circulator for a clock frequency of 750 MHz are shown in Fig. 19: (a) Simulated BB frequency domain representation Fig. 14(a). Note that the RX is not available as a separate RF of the generated pulse-shaped OFDM-like signal used in the port, and hence the circulator’s ANT-to-RX and TX-to-RX FD demo. (b) FD demonstration setup. FD demo results: a performance cannot be measured directly using S-parameters. -50 dBm weak desired signal is received while transmitting These performance metrics of the circulator are a part of a 0dBm average-power OFDM-like signal. Power spectral the circ.-RX measurements reported in the next subsection. density and time-domain representation of the RX BB output The minimum measured TX-to-ANT loss is 1.8 dB with only before and after digital SIC are shown (c) without the desired 0.1 dB degradation in a 100 MHz BW around the center ANT signal, and (d) with the desired ANT signal. The single frequency. Both TX and ANT ports are well matched across tone ANT signal is recovered after digital SIC. a 300 MHz BW. Fig. 14(b) shows the TX-to-ANT loss at the center frequency as clock frequency is tuned. For each clock frequency, phase-shift tuning between the clocks on B. Integrated Receiver either side is used to minimize the losses. The off-chip SMD- based matching network also improves the frequency range The baseband circuitry consists of a baseband amplification across which the S remains below 3 dB by making the ANT stage and harmonic recombination circuitry. All the BB cir- impedance closer to the nominal 50 . Less than 3 dB loss is cuitry use thick-oxide devices and run off a 2.4 V supply to maintained over 610-975 MHz by using the off-chip matching increase the power-handling of the circ.-RX. Four differential network. The measured circulator in-band (IB) TX-to-ANT BB amplifiers are implemented, each using an inverter with IIP3 is +32.3 dBm as shown in Fig. 14(c). This is higher large resistive feedback for self biasing and a common mode compared to the implementation in [8] due to the lower R feedback circuit. A 5-bit variable resistor is added at the output sw and the higher initial TX-to-RX isolation due to the SMD- to control the gain and BW. based matching network. Since the circulator is based on an 8-path filter, the BB signals have to be recombined to provide differential I/Q outputs. The outputs of the BB amplifiers are connected to the B. Circulator-Receiver Measurements without the Balance harmonic-recombination variable-gain G cells. The G cells m m Network are implemented as open-drain differential pairs with switch- The circulator-receiver operates over the frequency range of able devices for 5-bit variable gain. Note that the variable-gain the on-chip integrated circulator, namely, 610-975 MHz, with control is common for all the G cells, and therefore, is not a measured variable gain of 10-42 dB and a nominal gain of intended for harmonic rejection calibration. The differential 28 dB. The RF BW of the circulator varies over 10-32 MHz outputs of the G cells are connected to off-chip baluns as the gain is varied (Fig. 15(a)). The measured in-band IIP3 for testing. The I+/- outputs are created by combining the of the circ.-RX is -18.4 dBm at the nominal gain setting, and differential 0/180 phases with a weight of 1, 45/225 phases the measured out-of-band IIP3 is +15.4 dBm at a 500 MHz with a weight of 2=2 and 135/315 phases with a weight of offset frequency as shown in Fig. 15(b). Our measured OOB 2=2. Similarly, the Q+/- outputs are generated by assigning IIP3 value is similar to that of mixer-first receivers [17], [36], a weight of 1 to the 90/270 phases, and 2=2 weights to and can be improved to reach higher values with the use of 45/225 and 135/315 . This weighting cancels harmonics of more stages of low-pass-filtering through the receiver chain. the following orders: 3rd and 5th, 11th and 13th, and so on The measured TX-to-BB isolation referred to the ANT port is [36]. Similar to prior work, the harmonic rejection is limited better than 20 dB over more than 50 MHz BW (6:7% fractional to the precision of the 2=2 implementation and the mismatch BW) for a -40 dBm TX excitation after optimizing the on- between the devices. In this work, this scaling factor has been board matching network. A receiver NF of 6.3dB is measured, incorporated into the relative width of the NMOS devices in and is comparable to or better than that of mixer-first receivers SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 9 TABLE I: Performance summary and comparison with state-of-the-art full-duplex receivers. used for FD [17], [19] thanks to the relaxed receiver 50 -93 dBm and enable a link range of 100 m at the operation matching requirements and the effect of noise circulation. It frequency. should be emphasized that our reported NF encompasses both D. Comparison to the State of the Art the receiver and an on-chip shared-ANT interface. Table I compares this paper to prior integrated FD RXs. This work has the highest TX power handling and isolation C. Circulator-Receiver Measurements with the Balance Net- BW and the lowest NF among FD RXs with an integrated work antenna interface. It also provides the benefit of embedding Engaging and optimizing the balance network dramatically a balancing impedance to tune TX-to-RX isolation for minor improves the isolation for both small-signal and large-signal antenna VSWRs. When compared with our prior work in [8], TX excitations (Fig. 16(a)). The average large-signal isola- this work has lower power consumption, better NF, higher tion for a TX power of +7 dBm improves to 40 dB over tuning range, wider isolation BW, and higher effective IIP3 20 MHz BW. At the optimized balance network setting, the with respect to the TX port (and hence, higher TX power NF degrades by 1.7 dB to 8 dB (Fig. 16(b)). Enabling the handling). balance network also enhances the TX power for 1 dB gain compression of a weak desired signal from 0 dBm to +8 dBm VI. FD DEMONSTRATION as shown in Fig. 17. Fig. 18(b) depicts a two-tone TX test, tracking the TX main SI and its IM3 distortion at the RX To demonstrate the effectiveness of the circulator-receiver output. We have also implemented digital SIC in Matlab after architecture, a demonstration has been carried out in which capturing the baseband signals using an oscilloscope (a 12b a powerful modulated transmitted signal is canceled while quantizer). The digital SIC cancels not only the main SI but a weak continuous-wave desired signal is received from the also the IM3 distortion generated from the SI (Fig. 18(a)). antenna port. The total SIC for the main TX tones and TX IM3 tones are An OFDM-like BB signal is generated at a sampling rate 86 dB and 80 dB at +8 dBm average TX power, respectively. of 160 MSa/s, and it consists of 10 sub-carriers each with a The effective noise floor after digital SIC is -73 dBm. As bandwidth of 0.4 MHz occupying a total bandwidth of 5 MHz mentioned before, providing an additional 20 dB BB SIC, as (DC-1 MHz has been omitted due to implementation limita- shown before in [8], would result in an overall noise floor of tions related to the high-pass cut-off frequency of the off-chip SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 10 baseband baluns). The OFDM-like signal is pulse-shaped with REFERENCES square-root raised cosine (SRRC) filter with a roll-off factor of [1] C. L. I, C. Rowell, S. Han, Z. Xu, G. Li, and Z. Pan, “Toward green = 0:22. The total length of the OFDM-like signal is chosen and soft: a 5G perspective,” IEEE Communications Magazine, vol. 52, to be 50000 samples with an extra 2000 samples to sync the no. 2, pp. 66–73, February 2014. [2] S. Chen and J. Zhao, “The requirements, challenges, and technologies received sequence to the transmitted signal. 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Krishnaswamy, “Low- antenna systems is of significant interest. noise active cancellation of transmitter leakage and transmitter noise SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 11 in broadband wireless receivers for FDD/co-existence,” IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, vol. 49, no. 12, pp. 3046–3062, December 2014. [21] D. Korpi, J. Tamminen, M. Turunen, T. Huusari, Y. S. Choi, L. Anttila, S. Talwar, and M. Valkama, “Full-duplex mobile device: pushing the limits,” IEEE Communications Magazine, vol. 54, no. 9, pp. 80–87, September 2016. [22] X. Du, J. Tadrous, and A. Sabharwal, “Sequential beamforming for multiuser MIMO with full-duplex training,” IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, vol. 15, no. 12, pp. 8551–8564, Dec 2016. [23] “SKYFR-000709 miniature 2110-2170MHz single junction robust lead circulator data sheet,” Skyworks Solutions, Woburn, MA, USA. [24] S. A. Ayati, D. Mandal, B. Bakkaloglu, and S. 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Analysis and Design of Commutation-Based Circulator-Receivers for Integrated Full-Duplex Wireless

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0018-9200
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ARCH-3348
DOI
10.1109/JSSC.2018.2828827
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Abstract

SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 1 Analysis and Design of Commutation-Based Circulator-Receivers for Integrated Full-Duplex Wireless Negar Reiskarimian, Student Member, IEEE, Mahmood Baraani Dastjerdi, Student Member, IEEE, Jin Zhou, Member, IEEE, and Harish Krishnaswamy, Member, IEEE Abstract—Previously, we presented a non-magnetic, non- reciprocal N-path-filter-based circulator-receiver (circ.-RX) ar- chitecture for full-duplex (FD) wireless which merges a commutation-based linear periodically-time-varying (LPTV) non-magnetic circulator with a down-converting mixer and directly provides the baseband (BB) receiver signals at its output, while suppressing the noise contribution of one set of the commutating switches. The architecture also incorporates an on-chip balance network to enhance the transmitter (TX)- receiver (RX) isolation. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the architecture, including a noise analysis and an analysis of the effect of the balance network. The analyses are verified by simulation and measurement results of a 65 nm CMOS Fig. 1: FD N-path-filter-based circulator-receiver conceptual 750 MHz circulator-receiver prototype. The circulator-receiver architecture and block diagram. can handle up to +8 dBm of TX power, with 8 dB noise figure (NF) and 40 dB average isolation over 20 MHz RF bandwidth taneous transmission and reception, while achieving low loss, (BW). In conjunction with digital self-interference (SI) and its low noise, high linearity, especially for TX-side excitations, third-order intermodulation (IM3) cancellation, the FD circ.-RX and high isolation between the TX and the RX. Single-antenna demonstrates 80 dB overall SI suppression for up to +8 dBm TX average output power. The claims are also verified through FD is important to enable FD capability in hand-held devices an FD demonstration where a -50 dBm weak desired received [21], as well as extending it to MIMO applications, such as signal is recovered while transmitting a 0 dBm average-power FD massive MIMO base-stations to reduce the overhead of OFDM-like TX signal. channel state information (CSI) estimation [22]. Previously I. I NTRODUCTION reported single-antenna FD interfaces either use reciprocal electrical-balance duplexers [9]–[11], magnetic circulators [23] HE thousand-fold data capacity increase envisioned in or non-reciprocal active quasi-circulators [17], [24]. Recipro- the next generation of wireless communication networks cal antenna interfaces suffer from a fundamental minimum or ”5G” is expected to be delivered by technology candi- of 3dB loss in the TX-ANT and ANT-RX paths. In electrical dates such as full-duplex wireless and massive multiple-input balance duplexers, the losses can be made asymmetric to favor multiple-output (MIMO) wireless [1], [2]. FD aims to instantly either TX-ANT or RX NF performance [25]. Ferrite circulators double the link capacity in the physical layer by simultane- require the use of magnetic materials which renders them ously transmitting and receiving at the same frequency, as well incompatible with CMOS fabrication, and therefore bulky and as providing other benefits in the higher layers such as better expensive. Active quasi-circulators are limited by the noise spectral efficiency, reducing network and feedback signaling and linearity performance of the active devices. delays, and resolving hidden-node problems to avoid collisions Reciprocity can be broken using temporal modulation, a fact [3]–[6]. recognized decades ago in the microwave community [26], Achieving the 2 throughput gain and the other benefits [27]. More recently, there has been work on non-magnetic mentioned above is contingent upon overcoming several fun- passive non-reciprocal circulators based on spatio-temporal damental challenges associated with FD operation. The first modulation of material properties such as permittivity [28]– is the tremendous amount of self-interference from the trans- [30] and conductivity [7], [31]–[33]. These approaches are mitter at its own receiver. An FD system handling +8 dBm promising since they can theoretically achieve low loss, low of transmit power, with 20 MHz signal bandwidth and 8 dB noise, and high isolation, and can be configured to maximize NF budget, requires almost 100 dB of self-interference can- linearity for TX-side excitations as we have shown before in cellation (SIC) to cancel the TX leakage down to the receiver [7], [8], [34]. However, the practical demonstrations of these noise floor of 93 dBm. This can only be achieved through exciting but nascent approaches currently remain limited in multi-domain SIC at the antenna interface [7]–[13], RF/analog performance, particularly in noise and TX power handling. baseband [8], [12], [14]–[20] and in digital [3], [8]. The second challenge is the implementation of fully- In [7], [8], [34], non-reciprocity is achieved through phase- integrated single-antenna interfaces which can support simul- shifted commutation across a capacitor bank, i.e., within an arXiv:1805.05884v1 [eess.SP] 15 May 2018 SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 2 Fig. 2: A reciprocal antenna interface: (a) matched at the RX port; (b) unmatched at the RX port where RX reflection returns to the ANT port. A non-reciprocal antenna interface: (a) matched at the RX port; (b) unmatched at the RX port but Fig. 3: Circulator-receiver features: (a) noise circulation and preserving ANT matching. (b) isolation-enhancement through a balance network that tracks antenna variations. N-path filter. In [35], we introduced a new FD receiver architecture, namely an N-path-filter-based circ.-RX, which re-purposes the commutation-based non-reciprocal circulator to also perform down-conversion and provides direct access to baseband signals at its output, while maintaining noise performance that is comparable to mixer-first receivers [17], [36]. The resulting circ.-RX architecture has lower power consumption and NF since the antenna interface and mixing functionalities are achieved within the same block, eliminating the additional LNA/LNTA and mixer and their sources of Fig. 4: Simplified model to analyze the effect of balance noise. It also has the additional benefits of allowing the co- impedance on the performance of the circulator using the design of the antenna interface and the RX, and the embedding analytical S-parameters of the N-path filter (for N ! 1) and of TX-RX isolation-enhancing techniques. The enhancement series switch resistances - (a) for TX and ANT excitations, (b) of TX-RX isolation through the embedding of a reconfig- and for noise. urable balance network increases TX power handling, as the TX swing across the N-path switches is reduced, and more isolation is achieved before the first active baseband amplifier. some of the interesting features of an FD system where the This paper expands on [35] by providing additional in- antenna interface and FD receiver are co-designed and co- formation on system requirements and circ.-RX evolution in optimized as a whole. Section II, analyses to quantify the noise performance, effect A. FD Link Requirements of the embedded balance network, and the trade-off between linearity to TX excitations, isolation/balancing range, and TX- Consider an FD system with a TX average output power ANT/ANT-RX insertion loss in Section III, implementation of +8 dBm, signal BW of 20 MHz and NF budget of 8dB. details of the 65 nm CMOS 0:6 0:9 GHz circ.-RX in Section The equivalent half-duplex noise floor is 93 dBm, requiring IV, and a description of the measurement results and an FD >100 dB SIC. Our current system, shown in Fig. 1, is capable demonstration in Sections V and VI. Finally, Section VII of providing about +80 dB of SIC across antenna and digital concludes the paper. domains, as is discussed later in Section V. Additionally, we have previously reported in [8] the feasibility of BB SIC which II. FD S YSTEM REQUIREMENTS AND can provide an additional 20 dB cancellation. CIRCULATOR-R ECEIVER EVOLUTION Assuming a required SNR of 15 dB, 2.5 dBi TX and As mentioned earlier, we have shown that LPTV circuits RX dipole antenna gain, implementation losses of 5 dB, such as N-path filters enable the achievement of passive non- 10 dB margin for signal fading, and 5 dB (3) sensitivity reciprocity without the use of magnetic materials, and the degradation due to the residual SI and its IM3, the link budget integration of circulators in CMOS [7], [8]. This opens new of 8 dBm+5 dBi(93 dBm+5 dB+15 dB)5 dB10 dB = opportunities for the design of fully-integrated FD transceivers 71 dB translates to a transmission distance of 100 meters where the transceiver is co-designed with the antenna interface. at a frequency of 750 MHz, which begins to approach the In this section, we define the FD link requirements and discuss requirements for small-cell FD communication. SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 3 Detailed discussions of linearity requirements for such FD transceivers have been presented previously in [8]. A higher circulator isolation relaxes both the ADC dynamic range and the SI-canceling RX effective IIP3. Additionally, in our circulator architecture, increasing the isolation from TX to RX translates to lower voltage swings on the switches of the non- reciprocal element, which enhances the circulator linearity and transmitter power handling as well. B. RX Matching in Non-Reciprocal Antenna Interfaces Integrated receivers are typically designed to have a 50 input impedance to provide matching for the conventional Fig. 5: Analysis and simulation results of the ideal circ.-RX reciprocal antenna interfaces that precede them, such as SAW shown in Fig. 4(a), (a) without and (b) with the balance net- duplexers and filters. Matching is necessary to obtain best work across frequency for V = 2 V . The analysis is shown in;tx filtering performance from the duplexer or filter. Additionally, with markers while the lines represent simulations across any mismatch at the receiver port causes a reflection which frequency. Z = 50 , R = 3:5 and Z = 50 ant sw ant travels back to the antenna due to reciprocity and causes undesired ANT re-radiation (Figs. 2(a)-(b)). The need to simultaneously achieve input matching to 50 and noise matching for low noise performance, particularly over wide bandwidths, is the fundamental challenge of LNA/LNTA de- sign. Our FD receiver in [8] followed a similar conventional design methodology, where the integrated circulator and the subsequent receiver were both designed to provide a 50 impedance at the RX port. However, in the case of non- reciprocal antenna interfaces such as circulators, the receiver Fig. 6: Analysis of the effect of balance network on the ideal reflection circulates away from the ANT and is absorbed at circ.-RX: gyrator voltage V , representing the BB nodes, as the TX port (Fig. 2(c)-(d)). Hence, the Z value shown in rx a function of the balance resistance (a) for a V = 2 V in;tx Fig. 2(d) does not need to be 50 . It can be shown that TX excitation in Fig. 4(a) (V = 0 V ), and (b) for a in;ant increasing Z increases the voltage gain from ANT to the RX, rx V = 2 V ANT excitation in Fig. 4(a) (V = 0 V ). in;ant in;tx and for the case of a high impedance RX interface (Z ! 1), rx Z = 50 and R = 3:5 ant sw the voltage gain is maximized to 6 dB for an ideal circulator. 2V ant jV j = j j; for Z ! 1 : jV j = j2V j: (1) rx rx rx ant Recall that in a passive non-return-to-zero (NRZ) mixer, we 1 + rx have [38]: I 2 sin(D) It is worth pointing out that a non-reciprocal antenna BB;1path = : (2) interface can provide additional benefits such as lower LO I  2D RF;in and harmonic re-radiation at the ANT port, since these signals where I and I are the currents flowing into one BB1path RF;in circulate away from the antenna as well. of the baseband paths and from the RF source, respectively. As an example, for an 8-path NRZ mixer with D = 12:5%, BB1path 2 C. Embedded Down-Conversion and Noise Circulation = 0:22 dB, compared to 20log( ) = 3:92 dB RF;in in a 2-path mixer. In other words, similar to the case of the A conceptual architecture and block diagram of the NRZ mixer, by having a higher number of paths in the N- circulator-receiver are presented in Fig. 1. The circulator path filter, N , with lower duty cycle, D = , the RF-to- consists of a non-reciprocal LPTV gyrator built using an N- IF loss is improved since the fundamental component of the path filter [37], combined with three transmission line sections Fourier series for each LO waveform is stronger. Subsequent of an overall length of 3=4 at the operation frequency [7], recombination of different phases to create the I/Q signal [8]. As with all N-path filters, the non-reciprocal element can provide an effective RF-to-IF voltage gain. For example, can also be viewed as a mixer-low pass filter (LPF)-mixer combining the 8 phases for 3rd and 5th harmonic rejec- structure with phase-shifted clocks. In such a structure, it can 1 1 p p tion with 1; ; 0; weights for 0 /180 , 45 /225 , be seen intuitively that any RF signal appearing on Z is rx 2 2 90 /270 and 135 /315 phases results in an additional 12 dB down-converted and low-pass-filtered by the BB capacitors. recombination voltage gain. In other words, the circulator structure inherently includes a mixer-first receiver, and the BB signals captured on the BB An additional interesting behavior in the circ.-RX is noise capacitors can be used for further BB processing. Importantly, circulation. As we will show in Section III, the noise of the isolation continues to be seen between the TX port and the RX-side switches contribute mainly to the RX NF while the N-path filter BB nodes. noise of the TX-side switches circulates away. Hence, the SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 4 Fig. 7: Balance network structure used in simulations [10]. Fig. 9: (a) Noise transfer functions based on (11) and (b) theoretical NF of the circulator-receiver in the presence of the balance network. Fig. 8: Simulated (a) TX-BB isolation and (b) ANT-BB gain of the circulator receiver. Simulations are run on the extracted post-layout schematics of the circulator-receiver, including wirebond inductance and package parasitics, with the LC ladder-based balance network (inductor Q=20) model shown Fig. 10: Simulated NF of the circulator-receiver with and in Fig. 7. without the balance network optimized for 40 dB average isolation. The settings are similar to those of the simulation results shown in Fig. 8. NF of the circ.-RX is theoretically as low as that of tradi- tional mixer-first RXs despite the additional set of switches (Fig. 3(a)). III. ANALYSIS OF I NTEGRATED COMMUTATION-BASED CIRCULATOR-R ECEIVER PERFORMANCE M ETRICS A. Effect of the Balance Network In [8], we demonstrated a simplified method of analyzing D. Enhancing Circulator Isolation the N-path-filter-based circulator, by using the fundamental- to-fundamental S parameters of the N-path filter as a sim- The TX-to-RX isolation in any three-port shared-antenna plified model (ignoring harmonic conversion effects) along interface is limited to the quality of matching at the antenna with conventional microwave circuit analysis techniques for port. In a practical system, antenna matching depends heavily the overall structure. Using the same method, a simplified on environmental reflections. As a result, antenna tuners model for analyzing the circulator-receiver in the presence of are necessary to maintain TX-to-RX isolation across ANT the balance network is shown in Fig. 4(a). The N-path filter variations. If placed at the antenna port, the tuner should be is modeled using an ideal gyrator (assuming a large number as linear as the antenna interface itself for TX signals. In of paths N ) and the effect of switch resistance is captured addition, parasitics within the circulator itself can limit the through two series resistances with the gyrator element. isolation achieved. Inspired by the concept of the balance For an excitation at the TX, V in Fig. 4, the voltages in;tx network in electrical-balance duplexers [10], we have found at various nodes within the circulator can be found as: that incorporating a tunable impedance on the TX side of Z 1 the N-path filter, as shown in Fig. 3(b), can enhance TX- V = jV (3) ant in;tx Z Z R 0 0 sw RX isolation. In essence, the tunable impedance creates a 2 + 1 + R Z sw ant reflection that cancels out the reflected TX signal leaking to the BB nodes. It is also notable that in this work, the balance Z Z 0 0 2 + 1 network is placed at a low-voltage-swing node with respect R Z sw ant V = jV      (4) bal in;tx to the TX, hence maintaining the linearity benefits of the Z Z Z 0 0 0 1 + 2 + 1 + Z R Z bal sw ant circulator. However, there exists a trade-off between linearity, isolation, and loss, as will be discussed in the following Z Z Z 0 0 0 section. In this work, we have prioritized linearity and TX 1 + 1 Z R Z bal sw ant power handling, and therefore the balance network is mainly V = jV = jV 1 2 in;tx Z Z Z 0 0 0 1 + 2 + 1 + effective in combating the effect of circuit parasitics, rather Z R Z bal sw ant than handling large ANT variations. (5) SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 5 Fig. 13: The SMD CLC-based ANT matching network used on the PCB to compensate for parasitics and achieve a reasonable nominal TX-to-RX isolation. Z R Z 0 sw ant Z = (7) bal R Z + Z (Z Z ) sw ant 0 0 ant Fig. 11: Block diagram and schematic of the implemented 65 nm CMOS FD circulator-RX with integrated circulator and Various important points can be deduced from the equations balancing impedance. above. Firstly, Z becomes 0 when R is 0. This is bal sw representative of the fact that when R is 0, the gyrator is sw ideal, which means that if balancing has been accomplished and V is 0, then V is 0 as well. This would render a shunt 1 bal impedance at V ineffectual. Therefore, while placing the bal balancing impedance at V leads to linearity benefits due bal to the low swing at that node for TX excitations, it limits the utility of the balancing impedance to the compensation of parasitics within the circulator and minor ANT impedance variations. For R 6= 0, for Z = 50 , the required Z sw ant bal that results in perfect isolation is also 50 . Fig. 5 shows the results of our analysis at the center frequency as well as simulations across frequency using Cadence for the ideal circuit analyzed above without the balance network and with the addition of the balance network for an excitation at the TX port. As can be seen, without the balance network, in the Fig. 12: Chip microphotograph of the 65 nm CMOS full- presence of finite R , perfect isolation is seen at V but there duplex circulator-receiver. sw rx is finite voltage swing at V and V . However, by tuning 1 BAL the balance network according to Eq. (7) (i.e. to 50 ), the TX leakage is cancelled at the gyrator node V . Secondly, the TX- to-ANT loss in this case is largely not affected by the balance 2Z Z Z 0 0 0 + 1 Z R Z bal sw ant impedance Z , and only depends on the R and Z . This bal sw ant V = V (6) rx in;tx Z Z Z 0 0 0 is another expected benefit of placing the balancing impedance 1 + 2 + 1 + Z R Z bal sw ant at a node which has low swing for TX signals. Thirdly, as where V is the voltage at the antenna port, V and V are an example after balancing, V is -23 dB below V for ant rx bal bal tx the voltages at the right and left sides of the simplified non- R = 3:5 and Z = 50 , indicating the extent to which sw ant reciprocal N-path filter in Fig. 4(a), and V and V are the 1 2 the power handling requirements on the balance network are voltages at the ideal gyrator ports (essentially the BB nodes, relaxed. but without the frequency translation effect). This analysis Similarly, for an excitation at the ANT port, V , the in;ant in its current form is only valid at the center frequency of various voltages are: operation. However, an approach similar to [8] can be used to model the variation of the transmission lines’ response Z Z 1 Z 0 0 0 + 1 + Z R 2 Z ant sw bal across frequency, as well as that of the N-path filter. Due to V = jV = 2V 1 2 in;ant Z Z Z the complexity of the equations, here we opted to limit the 0 0 0 1 + 2 + 1 + Z R Z bal sw ant analysis to the center frequency and use Cadence PSS+PAC (8) simulations to verify our results and show the performance across frequency. From Eq. (5), by setting V to 0, a formula for the desired Z Z 1 0 0 Z R ant sw Z can be derived which nulls the TX leakage at the gyrator bal V = 2V (9) bal in;ant Z Z Z 0 0 0 as follows: 1 + 2 + 1 + Z R Z bal sw ant SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 6 Fig. 14: (a) Circulator TX-to-ANT S-parameter measurements for 750 MHz clock frequency. (b) Measured TX-to-ANT loss at the center frequency as the clock frequency is tuned. Phase tuning is used at each frequency to ensure minimum loss. The black/red curves are without/with the SMD-based ANT matching network. (c) Measured IB TX-to-ANT IIP3. Z Z Z 0 0 0 + 1 + Z R Z ant sw bal V = 2V      (10) rx in;ant Z Z Z 0 0 0 1 + 2 + 1 + Z R Z bal sw ant Fig. 6 shows the trade-off between TX-BB isolation and ANT-RX loss by plotting V using the equations above for both TX and ANT excitations and different values of the balancing resistance (Z = 50 and R = 3:5 ). It can ant sw be seen that unlike the previous case, the ANT-to-gyrator loss increases with a lowering of the magnitude of Z . Therefore, bal there exists a trade-off between TX-BB isolation and ANT-BB loss using this balancing scheme. The aforementioned approximate analysis captures the ba- sics of how the balancing network functions in the circ.- RX, and shows how it can compensate for switch resistance parasitics. To verify this intuitive understanding for other Fig. 15: Measured circulator-receiver (a) conversion gain, (b) types of parasitics, we have simulated our circ.-RX, along IIP3, (c) small-signal TX-to-BB isolation for -40 dBm TX with an LC ladder-based balance network model as used power and (d) NF. The balance network is not engaged in in [10], also shown in Fig. 7. This impedance network can these measurements. provide orthogonal impedance tunability just by varying the capacitor values. The inductors are fixed with a Q of 20. The circulator-receiver contains extracted layout parasitics, overall noise voltage at the gyrator is shown in Eq. (11) wirebond inductance and package parasitics. Fig. 8 shows the (assuming equal switch resistance on both sides of the gy- ANT-to-BB gain and the TX-to-BB isolation with and without rator). Where is the reflection coefficient of the balance bal the balance network, assuming 50 antenna impedance. As network, V = 4KTZ , V = 4KTR (i = 1; 2) and n;ant 0 n;i sw;i mentioned earlier, the balancing network is being used to V = 4KT:Re(Z ). This results in an equivalent noise n;bal bal compensate for layout parasitics, wirebond inductance and figure as in Eq. (12). package parasitics. More than 40dB average isolation can be It should be mentioned that Eq. (12) only captures the noise achieved over 20MHz RF BW with a 2.5 dB degradation in of the circulator alone and does not include the noise of the the ANT-RX loss. In our implementation, discussed later in following BB circuitry. Additionally, the noise equations are this paper, we have implemented a balance network consisting all derived for Z = Z , but can be modified to include ant 0 only of tunable capacitors and resistors, thanks to an SMD the effect of varying antenna impedance. Since we are not CLC-based fixed ANT tuning network incorporated on the working with large ANT variations in this work, we have used printed circuit board (PCB) performing a minor transformation the nominal antenna impedance for simplicity here. (VSWR=1.2). From these equations, it can be seen that the noise of the left-hand-side switches contributes differently to the noise B. Noise Circulation voltage at the gyrator than the noise from the antenna and Here, we derive equations for the noise transfer function the right-hand-side switches. Assuming that R is relatively sw of the switch noise sources as well as the balance network. small compared to Z , it can be seen from (11) that the The circuit diagram for noise analysis is shown in Fig. 4(b) noise from the left-hand-side switches vanishes at the gyrator where the various noise sources are highlighted in red. The node when there’s no balance network. In the presence of the SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 7 ! ! ! 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 bal bal bal 2 2 2 2 2 2 V = V = V 1 + + V 1 + V 1 + + V (1 ) (11) bal 1 2 n;ant n;1 n;2 n;bal R R R sw sw sw 4 4 4 4 1 + 1 + 1 + Z Z Z 0 0 0 ! ! 2 2 R R sw sw 1 + (1 + )(1 ) R bal R Re(Z ) bal sw sw Z bal Z 0 0 F = 1 + + + : (12) R R sw sw Z Z Z 0 1 + + 0 0 1 + + bal bal Z Z 0 0 Fig. 17: Measured ANT-to-RX-BB gain compression of a weak desired signal with and without balance network tuning Fig. 16: (a) Measured small and large signal TX-to-BB isola- versus varying TX output power level. tion after engaging the balance network. The balance network is reconfigured to maintain isolation for each TX power level. (b) Measured impact of the balance network on RX NF in the FD mode. balance network, the noise transfer functions from the switches depend on the network’s reflection coefficient. Fig. 9 shows the noise transfer functions and the NF calculated above as a func- tion of the balance network impedance for R = 3:5 (no sw other post-layout parasitics included). It should be mentioned that this NF plot is the worst case scenario, assuming that the balance network is completely resistive. As the balance network impedance becomes smaller, the noise contribution Fig. 18: (a) Nonlinear tapped delay line used for digital SIC, from the left-hand-side switches and the balance network and (b) measured two-tone TX test tracking the SI and its IM3 increases. For the optimal isolation (Z = 50 , as calculated bal distortion at the RX BB output with SI suppression across earlier) , the NF degrades by about 3 dB. This shows the antenna and digital domains. trade-off between the TX-to-BB isolation and RX NF. Fig. 10 shows NF simulations of the circ.-RX for Z = 50 ant with and without the balance network compensating for post- layout and package parasitics. The overall NF is degraded by around 2.5 dB to 4dB. Our measured NF is higher due capacitance of each path is 16 pF. Switch resistance for each to the additional noise contributions from the BB amplifiers of the sixteen transistors is around 3.5 . The sources/drains and the clock circuitry. An interesting future expansion of this of switches are biased at 1.2 V and are DC coupled to the noise analysis is to analyze the effect of phase noise on the BB amplifiers (which run off a 2.4 V supply as is discussed circulator, as has recently been done for N-path filters in [39]. later). The gates of the switches are AC coupled to the buffers and are biased at 1.35 V (DC level of a 12.5% pulse swinging IV. IMPLEMENTATION from 1.2 V - 2.4 V). The balance network is designed using a parallel resistive bank (6 bits) and a parallel capacitive bank The block diagram and schematic of the 65 nm CMOS FD (5 bits). More complex balance networks as demonstrated circulator-RX is shown in Fig. 11. in [10] can be used to increase the range of balancing that can be performed. An input clock at 4 times the operating A. Integrated Circulator frequency provides eight output phases in a Johnson-counter- The circulator was designed for tunable operation around based divide-by-4 block. Clock phase-shifting is performed for 750 MHz in 65 nm CMOS technology. The line is miniatur- one set of switches prior to division using multiplexed digital ized using three CLC sections implemented with on-chip MiM delay cells with analog varactor-based fine-tuning to cover a capacitors and off-chip air-core 8.9 nH inductors (0806SQ range of 76 to 78 around the nominal phase setting at from Coilcraft, Q >100). The N-path filter uses 8-paths to 750 MHz based on schematic-level simulations at the typical increase the ANT-RX BB recombination gain and achieve corner. Simulations also reveal that in the worst-case (slow- harmonic cancellation for the 3rd and 5th harmonics. The slow corner) the clock path degrades the NF by about 0.25 dB. SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 8 the G cells. The overall harmonic rejection of the circulator- receiver is expected to be more, due to the band-limited nature of the circulator transmission lines implemented in this work. V. M EASUREMENT RESULTS The chip microphotograph of the 65 nm CMOS circulator- receiver is shown in Fig. 12. It has an active area of 0.94 mm and is mounted in a 40-pin QFN package. An SMD CLC- based fixed ANT tuning network as shown in Fig. 13 has been incorporated on the printed circuit board (PCB) performing a minor transformation (VSWR=1.2) to compensate for QFN parasitics and achieve a reasonable nominal TX-to-BB isola- tion when the balance network is off. A. Integrated Circulator The measured two-port TX-to-ANT S-parameters of the circulator for a clock frequency of 750 MHz are shown in Fig. 19: (a) Simulated BB frequency domain representation Fig. 14(a). Note that the RX is not available as a separate RF of the generated pulse-shaped OFDM-like signal used in the port, and hence the circulator’s ANT-to-RX and TX-to-RX FD demo. (b) FD demonstration setup. FD demo results: a performance cannot be measured directly using S-parameters. -50 dBm weak desired signal is received while transmitting These performance metrics of the circulator are a part of a 0dBm average-power OFDM-like signal. Power spectral the circ.-RX measurements reported in the next subsection. density and time-domain representation of the RX BB output The minimum measured TX-to-ANT loss is 1.8 dB with only before and after digital SIC are shown (c) without the desired 0.1 dB degradation in a 100 MHz BW around the center ANT signal, and (d) with the desired ANT signal. The single frequency. Both TX and ANT ports are well matched across tone ANT signal is recovered after digital SIC. a 300 MHz BW. Fig. 14(b) shows the TX-to-ANT loss at the center frequency as clock frequency is tuned. For each clock frequency, phase-shift tuning between the clocks on B. Integrated Receiver either side is used to minimize the losses. The off-chip SMD- based matching network also improves the frequency range The baseband circuitry consists of a baseband amplification across which the S remains below 3 dB by making the ANT stage and harmonic recombination circuitry. All the BB cir- impedance closer to the nominal 50 . Less than 3 dB loss is cuitry use thick-oxide devices and run off a 2.4 V supply to maintained over 610-975 MHz by using the off-chip matching increase the power-handling of the circ.-RX. Four differential network. The measured circulator in-band (IB) TX-to-ANT BB amplifiers are implemented, each using an inverter with IIP3 is +32.3 dBm as shown in Fig. 14(c). This is higher large resistive feedback for self biasing and a common mode compared to the implementation in [8] due to the lower R feedback circuit. A 5-bit variable resistor is added at the output sw and the higher initial TX-to-RX isolation due to the SMD- to control the gain and BW. based matching network. Since the circulator is based on an 8-path filter, the BB signals have to be recombined to provide differential I/Q outputs. The outputs of the BB amplifiers are connected to the B. Circulator-Receiver Measurements without the Balance harmonic-recombination variable-gain G cells. The G cells m m Network are implemented as open-drain differential pairs with switch- The circulator-receiver operates over the frequency range of able devices for 5-bit variable gain. Note that the variable-gain the on-chip integrated circulator, namely, 610-975 MHz, with control is common for all the G cells, and therefore, is not a measured variable gain of 10-42 dB and a nominal gain of intended for harmonic rejection calibration. The differential 28 dB. The RF BW of the circulator varies over 10-32 MHz outputs of the G cells are connected to off-chip baluns as the gain is varied (Fig. 15(a)). The measured in-band IIP3 for testing. The I+/- outputs are created by combining the of the circ.-RX is -18.4 dBm at the nominal gain setting, and differential 0/180 phases with a weight of 1, 45/225 phases the measured out-of-band IIP3 is +15.4 dBm at a 500 MHz with a weight of 2=2 and 135/315 phases with a weight of offset frequency as shown in Fig. 15(b). Our measured OOB 2=2. Similarly, the Q+/- outputs are generated by assigning IIP3 value is similar to that of mixer-first receivers [17], [36], a weight of 1 to the 90/270 phases, and 2=2 weights to and can be improved to reach higher values with the use of 45/225 and 135/315 . This weighting cancels harmonics of more stages of low-pass-filtering through the receiver chain. the following orders: 3rd and 5th, 11th and 13th, and so on The measured TX-to-BB isolation referred to the ANT port is [36]. Similar to prior work, the harmonic rejection is limited better than 20 dB over more than 50 MHz BW (6:7% fractional to the precision of the 2=2 implementation and the mismatch BW) for a -40 dBm TX excitation after optimizing the on- between the devices. In this work, this scaling factor has been board matching network. A receiver NF of 6.3dB is measured, incorporated into the relative width of the NMOS devices in and is comparable to or better than that of mixer-first receivers SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 9 TABLE I: Performance summary and comparison with state-of-the-art full-duplex receivers. used for FD [17], [19] thanks to the relaxed receiver 50 -93 dBm and enable a link range of 100 m at the operation matching requirements and the effect of noise circulation. It frequency. should be emphasized that our reported NF encompasses both D. Comparison to the State of the Art the receiver and an on-chip shared-ANT interface. Table I compares this paper to prior integrated FD RXs. This work has the highest TX power handling and isolation C. Circulator-Receiver Measurements with the Balance Net- BW and the lowest NF among FD RXs with an integrated work antenna interface. It also provides the benefit of embedding Engaging and optimizing the balance network dramatically a balancing impedance to tune TX-to-RX isolation for minor improves the isolation for both small-signal and large-signal antenna VSWRs. When compared with our prior work in [8], TX excitations (Fig. 16(a)). The average large-signal isola- this work has lower power consumption, better NF, higher tion for a TX power of +7 dBm improves to 40 dB over tuning range, wider isolation BW, and higher effective IIP3 20 MHz BW. At the optimized balance network setting, the with respect to the TX port (and hence, higher TX power NF degrades by 1.7 dB to 8 dB (Fig. 16(b)). Enabling the handling). balance network also enhances the TX power for 1 dB gain compression of a weak desired signal from 0 dBm to +8 dBm VI. FD DEMONSTRATION as shown in Fig. 17. Fig. 18(b) depicts a two-tone TX test, tracking the TX main SI and its IM3 distortion at the RX To demonstrate the effectiveness of the circulator-receiver output. We have also implemented digital SIC in Matlab after architecture, a demonstration has been carried out in which capturing the baseband signals using an oscilloscope (a 12b a powerful modulated transmitted signal is canceled while quantizer). The digital SIC cancels not only the main SI but a weak continuous-wave desired signal is received from the also the IM3 distortion generated from the SI (Fig. 18(a)). antenna port. The total SIC for the main TX tones and TX IM3 tones are An OFDM-like BB signal is generated at a sampling rate 86 dB and 80 dB at +8 dBm average TX power, respectively. of 160 MSa/s, and it consists of 10 sub-carriers each with a The effective noise floor after digital SIC is -73 dBm. As bandwidth of 0.4 MHz occupying a total bandwidth of 5 MHz mentioned before, providing an additional 20 dB BB SIC, as (DC-1 MHz has been omitted due to implementation limita- shown before in [8], would result in an overall noise floor of tions related to the high-pass cut-off frequency of the off-chip SUBMITTED TO IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS 10 baseband baluns). The OFDM-like signal is pulse-shaped with REFERENCES square-root raised cosine (SRRC) filter with a roll-off factor of [1] C. L. I, C. Rowell, S. Han, Z. Xu, G. Li, and Z. Pan, “Toward green = 0:22. The total length of the OFDM-like signal is chosen and soft: a 5G perspective,” IEEE Communications Magazine, vol. 52, to be 50000 samples with an extra 2000 samples to sync the no. 2, pp. 66–73, February 2014. [2] S. Chen and J. Zhao, “The requirements, challenges, and technologies received sequence to the transmitted signal. 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Published: May 15, 2018

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