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A Balloon-Borne Very Long Baseline Interferometry Experiment in the Stratosphere: Systems Design and Developments

A Balloon-Borne Very Long Baseline Interferometry Experiment in the Stratosphere: Systems Design... The balloon-borne very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment is a technical feasibility study for performing radio interferometry in the stratosphere. The flight model has been developed. A balloon-borne VLBI station will be launched to establish interferometric fringes with ground-based VLBI stations distributed over the Japanese islands at an observing frequency of approximately 20 GHz as the first step. This paper describes the system design and development of a series of observing instruments and bus systems. In addition to the advantages of avoiding the atmospheric effects of absorption and fluctuation in high frequency radio observation, the mobility of a station can improve the sampling coverage (“uv-coverage”) by increasing the number of baselines by the number of ground-based counterparts for each observation day. This benefit cannot be obtained with conventional arrays that solely comprise ground-based stations. The balloon-borne VLBI can contribute to a future progress of research fields such as black holes by direct imaging. Keywords: balloon, interferometry, satellite system, radio telescopes, radio astronomy, black holes 1. Introduction Received 28 May 2018, Revised 20 August 2018, Accepted 14 Cosmic radio waves are degraded during their propaga- September 2018 tion through Earth’s atmosphere because of atmospheric Corresponding authors Email addresses: akihiro.doi@vsop.isas.jaxa.jp (Akihiro attenuation that reduces the radio signals, atmospheric Doi), kono.yusuke@nao.ac.jp (Yusuke Kono) Preprint submitted to Advances in Space Research December 12, 2018 arXiv:1812.04255v1 [astro-ph.IM] 11 Dec 2018 radiation that increases the effective system noise of a re- been launched into the stratosphere. Note that position ceiving telescope, and atmospheric fluctuation in the time determination to an accuracy of . 1/20 in terms of observ- domain that degrades radio wave coherence. The column ing wavelength for each element is crucial for accumulat- density fluctuation of water vapor in the tropospheric flow ing radio signal to establish interferometric fringes. This is the primary cause of phase fluctuation in the interfer- requirement represents a primary technical challenge for ometry response of radio telescopes. The Atacama Large maintaining the phase stability of stratospheric VLBI us- Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) on Chajnantor ing drifting balloons, which experience pendulum motion plateau, Chile is located at an altitude of approximately and string vibration between the balloon and the gondola. 5,000 m, where the amount of precipitable water vapor is The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) is typically 1.0 mm and falls below 0.5 mm up to 25% of the a balloon-borne radio interferometer that is used to in- time . ALMA has interferometric baselines of up to 16 km vestigate radio pulses originating from the interactions of for observations at ∼ 70–960 GHz. Intercontinental base- cosmic ray air showers based on correlations between an- lines using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) tech- tenna elements located on a single gondola platform (Anita niques have been established at 230 GHz (λ1.3 mm) by the Collaboration et al., 2009). Far-infrared interferometry Event Horizon Telescope project (Doeleman et al., 2009). experiments, the Far-Infrared Interferometric Experiment The primary aim of the project is to image black hole (FITE; Shibai et al. 2010) and the Balloon Experimen- shadows, although observing frequencies of higher than tal Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII; 300 GHz (submillimeter wave) might be required for clear Rinehart et al. 2014), will employ a meter class baseline imaging to avoid opacity effects and interstellar scattering between two individual mirror elements located on the through the atmospheres (accreting material) surrounding same gondola. Overall, maintaining a correct working re- black holes (Falcke et al., 2000). On the ground, submil- lationship between individual interferometry elements in limeter VLBIs are potentially available at a limited num- the stratosphere at submillimeter/THz regimes represents ber of telescopes on sites in particularly good conditions a significant technical challenge. The dynamical fluctua- at high altitudes. tions in a balloon-borne platform can also affect the phase The VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP; Hirabayassthaibility of the frequency standard clock, which is a criti- et al. 1998) and RadioAstron (Kardashev et al., 2013) cal component of VLBI system. Furthermore, maintaining have established space VLBI missions in which a single the pointing stability required to track a target source de- space-based radio telescope makes baselines to ground- mands careful treatment. Individual radio interferometric based telescopes at ≦ 22 GHz. The purpose of these mis- elements generally comprise a single heterodyne receiver sions is not to reduce atmospheric effects but to expand on a high gain antenna with a diameter of at least a few baseline lengths beyond the Earth’s diameter. Although meters, thus resulting in a beam width of the order of an submilllimeter/tera-hertz (THz) interferometry can be po- arcminute or less, then making absolute pointing accuracy tentially available between space–space baselines through (and not just stability) is required. For the BLAST tele- the use of multiple satellites, it would be expensive. Scien- scope, a pointing accuracy of less than 5 arcsec r.m.s. has tific balloons can typically reach stratospheric altitudes of been achieved in raster mapping (Pascale et al., 2008); ∼ 20–40 km, which are above 99.9% of the atmosphere’s however, the dynamical fluctuation of the gondola plat- water content, and balloon-borne radio telescopes realize form necessitated post-flight pointing reconstruction. observing sites that are essentially equivalent to space in In this paper, we present the configuration of observ- terms of radio observations. ing systems and gondola bus systems on the flight model Many balloon-borne single-dish submillimeter telescope of a balloon-borne VLBI station that is to be used in a missions have been launched to observe the cosmic mi- technical feasibility study for future stratospheric interfer- crowave background. Several such missions— Archeops ometric missions. The flight model was developed at the (Benoit et al., 2002), BOOMERanG (Crill et al., 2003), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in Sagami- and EBEX (Reichborn-Kjennerud et al., 2010)—used off- hara and at the National Astronomical Observatory of axis 1.3–1.5-m Gregorian telescopes to scan a wide field us- Japan (NAOJ) in Mizusawa and Mitaka, Japan. In Sec- ing a bolometer array located in the focal plane. Observa- tion 2, we describe the concept of the test flight model tions at high angular resolutions were made by PRONAOS as a balloon-borne VLBI station. In Sections 3 and 4, (Serra et al., 2002) and BLAST (Devlin et al., 2004), two the configuration and development of the observing sys- balloon-borne experiments employing 2 m class, on-axis tem and gondola bus system are described. In Section 5, Cassegrain-type telescopes. Thus, balloon-borne submil- we briefly discuss the experiment. Finally, the conclusion limeter radio telescopes have been technically established. is presented in Section 6. Such a platform could potentially serve as a VLBI station if it were equipped with a VLBI backend system. How- 2. Concept of experiment ever, to date, no individual interferometric element has This paper discusses the first attempt to achieve VLBI observation using a stratospheric balloon. The results of https://almascience.eso.org/about-alma/atmosphere-model 2 (a) (b) (c) (d) Figure 1: Four side views of the balloon-borne VLBI station. Sun shields and ballast boxes are not described in this model. (a) Front view, (b) Side view, (c) back view, and (d) top view. this experimental engineering mission is valuable to evalu- emission and/or H O maser line emission from astronom- ate the technical feasibility of future VLBI using balloon- ical objects may be observed as secondary targets if extra borne radio telescopes. The technical challenges are as time is available at the level flight. follows: (1) implementing an on-board frequency standard The balloon-borne VLBI station is scheduled to be launched clock; (2) implementing an on-board VLBI data recorder; from the Taiki Aerospace Research Field (TARF; Fuke (3) controlling the pointing of the telescope; (4) determin- et al., 2010), a scientific balloon facility operated by JAXA ing the position of the VLBI element under the environ- in Hokkaido, Japan. A scientific B30 balloon (30, 000 m ), mental conditions of the balloon-borne platform. fabricated by Fujikura Co., Ltd., will be used. After as- As the first step, a single-element balloon-borne VLBI cending for 0.5 h and drifting eastward for 1.5 hours at an station with a radio telescope and K-band (∼ 20 GHz, altitude of ∼ 12 km in a so-called boomerang flight op- λ1.5 cm) receivers are employed (four side views and a pho- eration (Nishimura and Hirosawa, 1981), the balloon will tograph of the station are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respec- reach a level altitude of 26 km, at which it will remain for tively). Several ground-based VLBI stations distributed 1.5 h or more for experimental VLBI observations. The over the Japanese islands are incorporated as counterparts total platform weight, not including a 180 kg ballast, is of VLBI elements to form baselines ranging from ∼ 50 to approximately 600 kg. The specifications of the observing ∼ 1, 000 km in length during the flight. The ground-based and bus systems are listed in Table 1. radio telescopes used in test observations in 2017 were the Mizusawa 10 m (Kameya et al., 1996; Shibata et al., 1994) 3. Observing Systems operated by NAOJ, the Takahagi 32 m (Yonekura et al., 2016) operated by the Center for Astronomy, Ibaraki Uni- A block diagram of the on-board observing and bus versity, the Kashima 34 m (Sekido and Kawai, 2014) op- systems is shown in Figure 4. erated by the National Institute of Information and Com- munications Technology (NICT), the Usuda 10 m oper- 3.1. Antenna ated by JAXA, and the Osaka Prefecture University 1.8 m The antenna is a Cassegrain-focal design with primary telescope (Figure 3). As a primary target, we utilize an and secondary mirror diameters of 1, 500 and 200 mm, re- artificial signal source of the geostationary satellite “IP- spectively, and a primary focal length of 488.7 mm. These STAR” (or “THAICOM-4”), which appears across a fre- optics parameters have been determined to utilize an ex- quency range of ∼ 19.6–20.2 GHz and includes a beacon isting fabrication design of the primary mirror. To en- at 20.199827 GHz. The IPSTAR signal is very strong and hance its rigidity, the parabolic primary mirror is com- allows us to perform measurements at a high signal-to- posed of two 3-mm thick layers of aluminum (A1100), noise ratio (SNR), thus it is useful to evaluate of the phase which are 1, 500 and 455 mm in diameter, respectively. stability of the on-board VLBI components. Continuum 3 The two parabolas were formed through a cold working process using a spinning machine manufactured by Kita- jima Shibori Seisakusho Co., Ltd. Based on a structural modeling analysis, the maximum expected self-weight de- formation is 0.2 mm at a point on the outer edge of the primary mirror. The surface accuracy of the primary re- flector is ∼ 0.25 mm r.m.s. including a self-weight defor- mation at the elevation of 10 deg, which was measured by photogrametry using V-STARS together with PRO-SPOT Target Projector to an accuracy of 0.03 mm. Therefore, the surface efficiency is expected to be 95.7% at 20 GHz. A subreflector unit with a tripod stay structure was attached during the measurement. The secondary mirror is 200 mm in diameter and is fabricated from aluminum A5052 via a machining process. Through laser scanning measurement, the secondary mirror surface accuracy was measured to be 30 µ m r.m.s. A corrugated horn has half-angle of 11.7 deg and illuminates the main reflector with an edge level of −10 dB. The optically designed aperture efficiency is 0.59, and the spillover loss is estimated to be 0.06. The blocking efficiency of the subreflector unit is ∼ 0.05, thus resulting in a calculated effective radio telescope aperture efficiency of 0.50. The primary beam size at the frequency ranges to be used for observations of IPSTAR and the astronomical radio sources is ∼ 0.6 deg. In order to reduce thermal de- formation due to solar heat input, the front and rear sides of the primary mirror were painted white. 3.2. Frontend: Receivers The front end (FE) systems are contained within an aluminum box, called “FEBOX,” that mechanically sup- ports the antenna as a load path using a rotating ele- Figure 2: Photograph of the balloon-borne VLBI station during a hanging test in the assembly room in JAXA TARF. Sun shields and vation axis. The dual circular K-band polarization re- ballast boxes are not attached to the gondola at this time. The Taiki ceiving system comprises a septum-type polarizer (Kaiden 1.5-m ground-based station is shown on the left. et al., 2009), a Weinreb’s low-noise amplifier (LNA) man- ufactured by the Caltech Microwave Research Group, a MITEQ LNA for left-handed circular polarization (LHCP), and a B&Z LNA and a MITEQ LNA for right-handed cir- cular polarization (RHCP). The LHCP and RHCP signals are joined in a combiner and are subsequently transferred together at a radio frequency (RF) regime to the exterior Balloon-Borne VLBI Station of FEBOX. The system minimizes the amount of mechan- ical twisting torque by employing a single co-axial RF ca- ble passing through the elevation axis via a rotary joint Mizusawa 10 m (Section 4.3). Single circular polarization observations are (NAOJ) Taiki 1.5 m made via the alternate use of LHCP/RHCP by depowering the respective LNAs. Only LHCP observation is planned Usuda 10 m (JAXA) for nominal use in matching the ground-based station re- Takahagi 32 m (Ibaraki University) ceivers as VLBI counterparts, thus relegating the RHCP Osaka Prefecture University receiver to the status of a standby redundant system. Note 1.8 m Kashima 34 m (NICT) that the IPSTAR signal comes in a linear polarization, while most astronomical radio sources are almost perfectly unpolarized. Each receiver has an efficiency of 1/2 toward Figure 3: VLBI network for test observations in 2017. the IPSTAR signal and astronomical radio sources. The Geodetic Systems, Inc. 4 system LHCP noise temperature has been measured to be herence within unit integration time. Integration time is approximately 320 K. The assumed antenna aperture ef- necessary to obtain sufficient signal to noise ratio to de- ficiency of 0.50 (Section 3.1) corresponds to an expected tect interferometric fringes, which is typically 10 seconds system equivalent flux density (SEFD) of ∼ 1 × 10 jan- or more for VLBI observations. The ground-based VLBI sky (Jy) for the telescope; the SEFD in RHCP is slightly stations use a hydrogen maser atomic clock (H-maser) worse than that in LHCP owing to the receiver’s noise tem- that satisfies this requirement; however, factors, such as perature differences between the respective LNAs. The weight, physical size, and environmental conditions, dic- fringe detection sensitivities are presented in Section 3.4. tate the use of different resources for clocks mounted on a flying object. As a standard frequency generator for the 3.3. Intermediate frequency Division balloon-borne VLBI, we adopted an 8607-B series OCXO, The platform’s intermediate frequency (IF) systems are which represents the second generation of OCXOs devel- contained in an aluminum box, called “IFBOX,” located oped by Oscilloquartz SA using the technique of housing on the exposed section of the gondola base frame. The a state-of-the-art Boitier Vieillissement Ameliore (BVA) RF signal is split through a divider into two bandpass fil- stress compensation cut (SC-cut) crystal resonator and its ters, with down-conversions to IF signals made using a associated oscillator components within double oven tech- first local (LO) reference signal at 21.0 GHz. A phase- nology. The Allan standard deviation of the frequency −14 locked dielectric resonator oscillator (hereafter referred to stability is lower than 8× 10 at τ = 1–30 sec. We con- as PLO) manufactured by the Nexyn Corporation gener- ducted a comparison between two OCXO8607s and several ates the first LO in synchronization with a 5 MHz reference atomic clocks based on VLBI experimental observations at signal. Following amplification and transmission from IF- 230 GHz. The evaluation results are reported in a sepa- BOX, the two IF signals are supplied to respective wide- rate paper (Kono et al., submitted). In the balloon-borne and narrow-band data recording systems (Section 3.4). VLBI platform, the OCXO8607 is installed within the PVS IFBOX also contains a distributor that supplies 5 and (Section 4.1). 10 MHz reference signals using a 5 MHz reference from the Two VLBI data acquisition systems that can operate oven-controlled crystal oscillator (OCXO) in a small pres- simultaneously are employed for the experiment. The first surized vessel (PVS; Section 3.4) located on the outside of system is a wide-band VLBI system for observing both IFBOX. IFBOX is entirely covered with polystyrene foam IPSTAR and astronomical objects. Four base-band sig- to reduce the influence of sharp temperature changes in the nals (Section 3.3), each with a 512 MHz bandwidth, are outside environment. A chamber test of IFBOX in which sampled using an ADS3000+ analog-to-digital sampler de- the stratospheric environment was simulated in terms of veloped by the National Institute of Information and Com- ambient temperature and pressure was conducted to con- munications Technology (NICT). The sampling is initially firm the functionality of the filters, amplifiers, and PLO. performed in 8-bit quantization, and the data are subse- The IF signal used for wide-band observation is trans- quently resampled in a 2-bit quantization at the Nyquist mitted to a large pressurized vessel (PVL) and divided sampling rate after level adjustment, thus resulting in an and filtered into four baseband channels (BBCs) in the aggregated bit rate of 8.192 Gbps. The digitized data are ranges 1, 024–1, 536, 512–1, 024, 1, 024–1, 536, and 1, 536– recorded at 8.192 Gbps using a mission-dedicated VLBI 2, 048 MHz, corresponding, respectively, to RFs of: 19.464– software recorder that was developed by upgrading a VS- 19.976 GHz, 19.976–20.488 GHz, 22.024–22.536 GHz, and REC VLBI recorder that is being developed by NAOJ 22.536–23.048 GHz. The IPSTAR observation is performed (Oyama et al., 2012). The improvements involve replac- using the first two BBCs, while astronomical observation ing the VSREC hard disk drives with solid-state drives is performed using all four BBCs. The IF signal for the (SSDs) of 4 TB for data and 0.5 TB for operating system narrow band of observation is sent to a mid-sized pressur- and reducing the energy consumption rate by introducing ized vessel (PVM) and down-converted using the second a new motherboard (Skylake ) and CPU. Hereafter, we LO reference signal to a 0–32 MHz BBC, corresponding to refer to this dedicated VSREC as “VSREC.” The wide- an RF of 19.660–19.692 GHz for its use in IPSTAR obser- band VLBI system is installed within the PVL. With the vation. As the second LO generator, a Pilulu833 phase- 8 Gbps recording rate, the 7-sigma fringe detection sensi- 3 6 locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer module using an tivities of the baseline between the balloon-borne station HMC833 integrated circuit (IC) is employed. The second and Takahagi 32 m ground-based telescope is expected to LO is locked in synchronization with a 10 MHz reference be ∼ 3–10 Jy (T = 40–500 K; Yonekura et al. 2016). sys,32m signal to generate the 2nd LO frequency 1.34 GHz. We assume the integration of 1 sec. In our plan for the flight experiment, 3C 454.3 or 3C 84 (∼ 20 Jy) is observed 3.4. Backend: VLBI Systems as a target of the astronomical object. The frequency standard clock device used for VLBI Intel Corporation. observations is required to have stability to maintain co- The theoretical baseline sensitivity (1-sigma) is defined as −1 0.5 η (SEF D SEF D /(2Bτ)) in Jy, where η(≈ 0.8) is a correla- i j Denshiken Co., Ltd. tion efficiency, B is the bandwidth in Hz, and τ is the integration Hittite Microwave Corporation time in sec. 5 FEBOX PVL PVM GPS Antennas RF signal IFBOX POL RHCP LHCP GPS RX RX (R) RX (L) 1PPS I/F signal D/C 19G HYB 1PPS SW 21.0 GHz 1PPS HYB 1PPS RF signal BB I/F signal 10GbE RF BOX ADS3000+ VSREC K5VSSP32 D/C 22G D/C PLO lock Monior SAS PVS 1.34GHz 10 MHz 21.0 GHz PLO SSD SYNTH USB2 OCXO REF DIST NUC/PC 10 MHz 5 MHz Figure 4: Block diagram of the observing systems for balloon-borne VLBI station. Abbreviations in the figure are as follows. POL: polarizer, RX: Receiver for low-noise amplifiers, HYB: hybrid coupler, D/C: downconverter, REF DIST: reference signal distributor, SYNTH: synthesizer, SW: switch, BB: base band signals. The other VLBI system, which operates within the the radio telescope that is to be launched in the experi- PVM, is a narrow-band system that employs the a K5/VSSP32ment. VLBI sampler, which is developed by NICT (Kondo et al., 2006). A base-band signal with a bandwidth of 32 MHz is 4. Bus Systems sampled in a 2-bit quantization at the Nyquist sampling 4.1. Pressurized Vessels rate, thus resulting in an aggregated bit rate of 128 Mbps. The ambient pressure and temperature in the strato- Although using K5/VSSP32 makes 256 Mbps in two IFs sphere are expected to be ∼ 1/50 atm and ∼ −50 C, re- available, only one IF includes the most significant compo- spectively, during the level flight of the platform. Because nent in the IPSTAR signal at an RF of 19.675 GHz. The R many commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products are used digitized data are recorded on the SSD of an Intel Next for the experiment, the three pressure vessels (PVs) dis- Unit of Computing (NUC) mini PC. cussed in the previous sections are used to maintain en- To achieve time adjustment, the ADS3000+ and K5/VSSP32 vironmental conditions similar to those on the ground of samplers are synchronized to a 10 MHz reference signal ∼ 1 atm and room temperature. All the PVs are made during observation and with a 1 pulse-per-second (1PPS) of 4-mm thick domes and 11-mm thick aluminum (A5052) signal of the global positioning system (GPS) before obser- base plates fabricated by Kitajima Shibori Seisakusho Co., vation. Linear and quadratic drifts of the OCXO clock will Ltd. The PV domes and base plates are sealed together cause time offset to change. Off-line procedures of fringe by tightening them with a mechanical clamp, and the base search/fitting are applied in correlation/data-reduction pro- plates are equipped with several hermetic connectors for cesses after the observation. power supply lines, signal lines and co-axial cables. Two air cocks are also attached on each base plate for gas re- 3.5. Power detector and spectrometer placement of air potentially containing moisture by dry We designed the VLBI element so that it can be also nitrogen before the launch. used as a single telescope by adding a power detector soft- The small pressurized vessel (PVS) has a diameter of ware and a spectrometry software. The software processes 400 mm and a height of 271 mm. It contains the com- the digitized data acquired by K5/VSSP32 in which a ponents that require temperature stability, including the base-band signal with a width of 32 MHz in semi-real-time OCXO, the three-axis gyroscopes, and the three-axis ac- with delay of 0.8 seconds every 0.1 second. The power de- celerometers. Much of the internal volume of the PVS tector software calculates the square mean. We intend to is filled with a thermal insulating material to prevent the use the detector output for observations of the continuum devices from suffering rapid changes of temperature. The emissions of the Moon and Sun. The spectrometry soft- exterior is an unpainted aluminum surface that is expected ware calculates the power spectrum by FFT processing to to be insensitive to ambient radiation fields. output the power ratio of the carrier component the IP- The PVM has a diameter of 400 mm and a height of STAR signal to the adjacent noisy back ground spectrum. 611 mm and contains several Raspberry Pi operational At the location of TARF in the eastern part of Hokkaido, PCs (OPCs) for command/telemetry operation, attitude IPSTAR has been detected at approximately 2–3 dB using Raspberry Pi Foundation. 6 Table 1: Specifications of observing and bus systems for balloon-borne VLBI experiment. Parameters Unit Value Antenna diameter meter 1.5 Surface accuracy RMS mm 0.25 Aperture efficiency 0.50 System noise temperature T Kelvin 320 sys System equivalent flux density (SEFD) Jy 1,006,000 Observing frequency (mode A) GHz 19.660–19.692 Observing frequency (mode B) GHz 19.464–20.488 Observing frequency (mode C) GHz 19.464–20.488 22.024–23.048 Half-power beam width (HPBW) degree 0.64 1st local oscillator frequency GHz 21.000 Analog-to-digital conversion quantization bit 2 Recording rate (mode A) Gbps 0.128 Recording rate (mode B) Gbps 4.096 Recording rate (mode C) Gbps 8.192 SSD media capacity Tbyte 4 Dimension of gondola base frame (W×D×H) meter 2.60 × 1.40 × 4.18 Total weight (dry) kg 608 Ballast weight kg 180 Battery capacity Wh 5320 Power consumption (typical) W 370 Including the optics efficiency, the reflection loss, the blocking factor, and the spill over loss. Including an pointing error of 0.21 degree at maximum. Defined at the center frequency of mode B. determination (Section 4.2), attitude control (Section 4.3), full operation without fan activation, the air temperature and housekeeping. In addition, the PVM houses the GPS eventually increased to a hazardous level (> 40 C); how- compass receiver, the downconverter, a 1PPS distributor, ever, the air temperature maintained at ∼ +15 C during one of the two VLBI systems (K5/VSSP32; Section 3.4), fan activation, which was expected based on our analytical three Ethernet switching hubs, and relay array modules to thermal design. power on/off controls and reboot dysfunctional devices. 4.2. Attitude Determination Systems The PVL has a diameter of 550 mm and a height of 788 mm and contains the wide-band VLBI system that The attitude determination system (ADS) provides op- comprises the ADS3000+ and VSREC (Section 3.4). The erational attitude determination (OPC-AD) under the con- following two conflicting requirements make the thermal trol of a Raspberry Pi 3 model B installed within the design of this unit difficult. The considerable power con- PVM. The function of the OPC-AD is to collect informa- sumption (∼ 280 W) of these two instruments results in tion from the attitude sensors, calculate an attitude deter- a high rate of heat generation during their recording op- mination solution, and subsequently send attitude control eration. On the other hand, the retention of startup tem- commands to the operational PC for the attitude control perature condition is required during standby operation system (OPC-AC; Section 4.3). to obtain power saving (∼ 40 W) before VLBI observa- The attitude determination solutions in the azimuth tions. Owing to this dilemma in thermal design, we de- (AZ) angle are calculated by combining the outputs of a cided to place actively controlled fans between a heat dis- coarse sensor and a fine sensor through a complementary sipating compartment and a thermally insulated compart- filter. We use a JG-35F fiber optic gyro (FOG) as the ment, resulting in a dual-compartment PVL. The exterior fine AZ-axis sensor. The FOG has a resolution of a few surface of the PVL dome is painted white to aid in ra- arcseconds, and a coarse sensor that is less accurate but diation cooling. The assembly performed quite well in a provides an absolute angle is used to compensate for ap- thermal vacuum test in which an environment equivalent parent velocity drift in the gyro output. OPC-AD can se- to that during a level flight was simulated. The air tem- lect an on-board GPS compass, a geomagnetometer, or a perature of the thermally insulated compartment contain- ing the VLBI instruments did not decrease below ∼ 0 C Developed by Raspberry Pi Foundation. during the standby mode. As the instruments went into Japan Aviation Electronics Industry, Ltd. 7 solar angle sensor as the input to the complementary filter. stratosphere with these test models, although these are The GPS compass uses a PolaRx2e@ GPS receiver cou- not used for on-flight attitude determination in this ex- pled with one L1/L2 antenna and two L1 antennas . This periment. The star trackers in the daytime stratosphere compass configuration has been previously used in flight requests designed to prevent saturation due to foreground in the pGAPS experiment at TARF (Fuke et al., 2014). A radiation from the sky. Based on the conceptual design three-axis MAG-03 MS magnetic sensor is used as the of DayStar (Truesdale et al., 2013), we fabricated the fol- geomagnetometer; previously, it was used in flight and sub- lowing two daytime star trackers to be used as cameras to sequently retrieved from the sea in an ISAS balloon-borne detect star images: UI-3370CP-NIR-GL using a CMO- 15 16 infrared astronomy mission. The sun sensor is an imaging SIS image sensor and UI-1240ML-NIR-GL using an 17 18 camera based on a Raspberry Pi camera board with a field E2V image sensor with an LP610 red longpass filter of view of approximately 60 × 50 deg. The resulting out- with a cut-on wavelength of λ610 nm to reduce the blue put from the complementary filter has several arcseconds sky foreground. The trackers are equipped with baffles; to of stability and an absolute accuracy of ∼ 0.1–1 deg. enable an obstruction light avoidance of 12 degrees, they The attitude determination solutions in the elevation have lengths of approximately 400 mm and square aper- (EL) angle are also calculated using a complementary fil- tures of roughly 120 mm. In the stratosphere, we perform ter. As a fine sensor along the EL axis, CRH02-025 silicon a star shooting test at various sun angles and altitudes in- ring gyroscope sensors based on micro-electro-mechanical cluding ascent. In order to evaluate the design concepts of system technology are mounted on the radio telescope’s the baffle and camera system, we measure the sun angle frame. The EL gyro has a resolution of a few arcseconds dependence of stray light and the relationship between the and the pitch output from the three-axis geomagnetome- star magnitude and SNR, respectively. ter is used as one of the inputs of the complementary filter The pitch and roll orientations of the gondola base to compensate for the apparent velocity drift of the gyro frame are monitored by CRH01-025 and CRS39-02 sili- output. Note that the geomagnetometer is located on the con ring gyroscope sensors , an LCF-23102-D tilt meter, gondola base frame, and the difference in coordinate sys- an LCF-25302-D accelerometer , and a MMA84513-D ac- tem between the telescope and gondola frames is compen- celerometer, all of which are installed in the PVS (Sec- sated by the optical encoder used for driving the EL drive tion 4.1). Orientation is achieved with respect to the fol- (Section 4.3). In other words, the attitude determination lowing two frames: an pendulum orientation defined with in EL is not affected by the pitch component in the pendu- respect to the gravity vector, and a static orientation de- lum motion between the balloon and the gondola as both fined with respect to the flight train direction based on the gyroscope and the geomagnetometer are influenced by the imbalance in the mass distribution following ballast the inertial space system. Thus, the output from the com- discharge. Gyro sensors respond the former component, plementary EL filter also has several arcseconds of stability while accelerometers sense the latter one. If static orien- and an absolute accuracy of ∼ 0.1–1 deg. tations with respect to the AZ gyroscope’s axis remain in As the primary beam size of the radio telescope is ap- pitch and roll, a fraction of the pendulum motion would proximately 0.5 deg at FWHM (Section 3.1), an absolute contaminate the output from the AZ gyroscope; therefore, angle determination accuracy of 0.1 deg angle is required a determination of the dynamical orientation by the OPC- for pointing to the target. As solely the output of the AD is necessary for real-time correction of the AZ deter- compensation filter does not satisfy this requirement, our mination by taking static orientation into account. operational strategy involves performing a raster scan on the sky centered on the predicted location of IPSTAR and 4.3. Attitude Control Systems (ACS) pointing to it using the output of the spectrometer (Sec- The radio telescope is driven on an azimuth–elevation tion 3.5). Following this, we calibrate the coarse sensors (AZ–EL) mount coordination system. Attitude control for subsequent observations of astronomical objects. As- along the AZ axis is achieved by yawing the entire gon- tronomical maser objects normally used in ground-based dola using a reaction wheel (RW) equipped at the center VLBI telescopes can not be used for pointing calibration of the gondola and is aided by the coarse “PIVOT” AZ due to insufficient sensitivity of the on-board radio tele- actuator located on top of the gondola. Pointing along scope. the EL is performed by rotating only the radio telescope We are planning to use star trackers for fine attitude frame. determination in future missions. In this experiment, two test models of the star tracker are mounted parallel to IDS Imaging Development Systems GmbH. the optical axis of the radio telescope to the back of the ams AG. secondary mirror. We will make shooting tests in the IDS Imaging Development Systems GmbH. Teledyne e2v (UK) Ltd. Midwest Optical Systems, Inc. Septentrio Satellite Navigation N.V. Silicon Sensing Systems Ltd. Sensor Systems Inc. Jewell Instruments LLC. Bartington Instruments Ltd. Silicon Sensing Systems Ltd. 8 All of the actuators have direct drive motors, which are to feedback control excitation. Note that at EL 6= 0 deg, it superior to mechanical geared motors as they (1) experi- is necessary to utilize two-axis gimbals to perform rolling ence no backlash, (2) are unbreakable even under an unex- along the EL to compensate for the drift in the antenna pectedly large external torque, and (3) provide quasi-free pointing arising from the pendulum motion in the roll di- rotation on demand by depowering to avoid the influence rection in practice (e.g., Ward and Deweese, 2003). For the of external disturbance torques. However, the direct drive initial flight test, the WASP-like mechanism in the gondola motors are both dimensionally larger and heavier than system has a single one-axis actuator along the EL. geared motors. Kollmorgen’s frameless brushless direct The performance of the attitude controls under hanging drive motors are applied to the RW (Model KBMS17H03- testing will be reported in a separate paper. D), PIVOT, and EL drives (KBMS43S02-B). Sixteen-bit incremental shaft encoders are used for RW and PIVOT 4.4. Position Determination (DFS60A-THAK65536 ), while a non-contact optical en- Fluctuation in the line-of-sight direction component of coder read-head and φ150-mm stainless steel ring with the position of the VLBI station degrades the coherence 20 µ m pitch graduations combination (Model Ti2601 and of the received radio wave. The fluctuation must be kept RESM20USA150 ) is used for the EL drive. The mo- below about 1/20 wavelength to maintain the coherence. tors are driven using digital servo drivers (“Whitsle ”) This is the requirement for signal integration during the controlled from the OPC-AC via RS232C serial communi- time needed to improve the SNR (typically 10 s or longer) cation at a rate of 10 Hz. for the fringe detections of astronomical radio sources. Our The PIVOT drive plays the following two roles: unload- approach is to estimate the position change using onboard ing over-accumulated momentum of the wheel and cancel- sensors and correct the received radio wave by rotating the ing the twisting torque that occurs when the flight train phase during correlation processing. connects to the balloon, which can rotate randomly at a We install an accelerometer in the radio telescope frame typical rate of ∼ 0.1 rpm going up to ∼ 1 rpm. By turn- along the telescope’s optical axis to estimate the posi- ing off PIVOT’s power until it needs to be activated for tion change successively by integrating the second-order unloading of accumulated RW momentum, the gondola’s output of the accelerometer. To do this, we use a JA- yawing should be practically free from the perturbation 40GA02 accelerometer , which has a sensitivity of up to torque generated by the balloon. A ground-based test re- 0.7 µ G. Based on a numerical simulation assuming com- sulted in a controlled stability of ∼ 0.01 deg in the AZ bined translational and pendulum motion involving shear control during the simultaneous activation of both the RW disturbances of wind speed, we expect a sequential position and PIVOT drives. determination accuracy ∼ 40 µ m for 10 µ G measurement Pointing control along the EL is performed by rotat- noise. Although the output of the accelerometer usually ing the radio telescope frame using the elevation actuator, includes systematic errors in offset and drift, these can be which was designed on the basis of the mechanical con- solved through fringe search processing of the interferom- cept of the Wallops ArcSecond Pointing (WASP) system eter. The output of the accelerometer is recorded along (Stuchlik, 2014, 2015). The WASP concept involves the with the time stamp during the VLBI observation and use of a shaft that is continuously rotating at a constant subsequently analyzed following observation and recovery. rate of ∼ 30 rpm, with both the gondola base frame and Another position determination method is to estimate the telescope frame floating on the rotating shaft via axial the pendulum angle of the balloon-gondola system by in- roll bearings. As a result of this configuration, no static tegrating the velocity output of the pitch component from friction should affect the telescope with respect to the gon- the gyroscope mounted on the gondola base frame and dola during the switch-backing of the pendulum, and the multiplying the result by the physical length of the pen- dynamic friction on the axial roll bearings on the left and dulum to obtain the change in position. Application of this right sides of the EL axis should somewhat balance each strategy in a VLBI observation using the flight model un- other. The radio telescope is balanced with respect to the der pendulum disturbance during hanging test produced EL axis by a counter weight. In principle, the telescope a detectable clear fringe; the results to be reported in a should remain fixed with respect to the inertial space coor- separate paper (Kono et al., submitted). dinates even if a disturbance, such as pendulum vibration is added to the gondola frame. Accordingly, the EL drive 4.4.1. Power Supply Unit motor is activated with a very slight force when a pointing As a power supply, the platform employs PC40138LFP- displacement occurs. A ground-based test resulted in a 25 15Ah lithium-ion battery cells (3.3 V, 15 Ah) using LiFePO4 controlled stability of ∼ 0.01 deg in the EL control during as the positive electrode material. Each battery module the pendulum motion of ∼ 1 deg or less, and we found no comprises eight series-connected cells, assembled by Wings signature of potentially increased pendulum motion owing Japan Aviation Electronics Industry, Ltd. SICK AG. Phoenix Silicon International Co. Renishaw plc. Elmo Motion Control Ltd. 9 Co. Ltd, producing 26.4 V and 396 Wh/module. The gon- aperture of the radio telescope from an elevation angle of dola is equipped with 14 modules connected in parallel, 60 deg or above, making this the practical elevation limit producing approximately 5,500 Wh in total. The typi- of the telescope. The pressurized vessels, battery box, and cal power consumption during level flight is expected to radio telescope are supported by aluminum frames and be 400 W, reaching a maximum of approximately 600 W. are further mechanically interfaced to the nodes of the The PC40138LFP-15Ah battery cell has a recommended trusses. As the linear thermal expansion coefficients of operational temperature range of −10–+55 C during dis- SUS304 and aluminum differ, the truss structure and alu- charge. We conducted discharge tests at ambient tempera- minum frame are fastened with a degree of freedom left to tures of −20, 0, and +25 C and found that approximately accommodate the expected direction of thermal deforma- 50, 75, and 100% of the total capacity, respectively, were tion. Because the entire gondola will be recovered from available under these conditions. the sea at the end of the flight mission, a float fabricated The battery modules and housekeeping electronics are from expanded polystyrene foam (550ℓ in volume) is en- contained within a W1, 250×D480×H270 mm aluminum closed within the truss structure, with an additional 90ℓ box manufactured by Shin Kowa Industry Co., Ltd . The expanded polystyrene float installed near PIVOT. Com- box is made doubly waterproof in the case it gets sub- bined with the volume of the pressurized container and merged in seawater to recover the gondola system through the battery box, the net buoyancy is equivalent to approx- the inclusion of a thermal insulation box fabricated from imately 1, 000ℓ. We analyzed the expected altitude after expanded polystyrene foam with thermostatically controlled landing with respect to the mass and buoyancy distribu- 27 30 heaters. Vent filters located on the boxes are used to tions using the Grasshopper and found that PIVOT, adjust the internal pressure to conform to altitude-related which is the point that will be grappled by the crane of the changes. A thermal vacuum test conducted in a chamber- recovery ship, should float on the sea surface. The overall recreated stratospheric environment resulted in an internal gondola structure will either float with the antenna facing temperature of ∼ 10 C, which is consistent with the pre- downward (with a 70% probability) or with it facing up- dictions of our numerical thermal analysis. ward (30% probability). Four ballast boxes are installed at both lower sides of the gondola base frame, and approx- 4.4.2. Gondola Structure imately 180 kg of iron powder will be loaded as ballast. The gondola base frame was designed to meet require- ments in terms of weight, strength (including low-temperature 5. Discussion environments), nonmagnetism, the field of view of the tele- scope, and cost. The solution we obtained was a boat- The balloon-borne VLBI station described in this pa- shaped truss structure formed from SUS304 pipe rods, per has been fully developed. A first launch attempt from which helped to increase the specific rigidity of the gon- TARF was scheduled on July 24, 2017, but it was can- dola base frame. As our initial survey indicated that no celed owing to changes in the wind condition at ground commercially available truss system could satisfy our re- level. Through technical tests conducted at TARF be- quirements from the perspectives of weight and cost, we fore and after the event, interferometric fringes were suc- used Technotrass building structural parts developed cessfully detected in all the baselines of the balloon-borne by TechnoSystems. Twelve varieties of pipe rods with di- VLBI station (under pendulum disturbance) toward the ameters of 34 mm and thicknesses of 1 mm were specially ground-based VLBI stations (Kono et al., submitted). The manufactured by Gantan Beauty Industry Co., Ltd and rescheduled single element flight will be a technical fea- assembled. To satisfy the 10 G static loading condition sibility demonstration of balloon–ground baselines at ∼ imposed on gondola systems launched at TARF, we used 20 GHz. A future goal will be to establish balloon–ground SUS304, which neither exhibits low temperature brittle- baselines at higher frequencies or balloon–balloon base- ness nor affects the geomagnetic sensor. We validated lines via simultaneous balloon flights, providing a strato- the structural design through structural analysis includ- spheric VLBI imaging array free from atmospheric effects. ing a buckling phenomenon, resulting in a unit meeting Next, we discuss the advantages and future prospects of the 2,600 mm (width) × 1,400 mm (depth) × 840 mm balloon-borne VLBI. The system configuration character- (height) dimensional requirement and the 100 kg mass re- istics relevant to the current experiment are those of the quirement. devices mounted on-board, namely, the frequency stan- The gondola width was designed not to hinder the aper- dard clock and the data recorder. On the other hand, the ture of the radio telescope with its wire cables from four VSOP satellite had no frequency standard clock or a data corner foot points (Figure 1(a)). The four wire cables are recorder. Link systems provided reference signal on uplink connected to the flight train via PIVOT, which blocks the and data transfer on downlink. This system configuration was complicated and costly. As a result, the observation http://www.shin-kowa.co.jp 27 R GORE VENT; https://www.gore.com/products/categories/venting 30 TM 28 Grasshopper graphical algorithm editor with integrated 3D http://www.ts.org/techno truss.html modeling tools. https://www.gantan.co.jp/ 10 Figure 5: Simulations of uv-coverages assuming seven-day flights around Antarctica and observation toward the Galactic center. The observing frequency is 350 GHz. (a) Four ground-based stations. (b) Four ground-based stations and one balloon-borne station. (c) Four ground-based stations and one additional Antarctic ground-based station. was limited within the range of operating time of ground- lizes the rotation of the Earth to generate baseline vector based tracking stations. Less severe environmental condi- variation, only a series of the identical trajectories can be tions for scientific balloon payloads make it easier to mount obtained everyday. However, adding a moving balloon- onboard these critical components for VLBI, which brings borne station increases the daily variation of trajectories about the advantage of simplifying the system configura- for uv-coverage in the following manner: tion for a VLBI station. The ability to recover the record- N(N − 1) M(M − 1) ing media is another advantage of balloon-borne missions + + NM × D, (1) 2 2 over conventional space missions. Given the progress that has been made in increasing recording media densities, a where M is the number of moving stations and D is the recording rate of 10–100 Gbps could potentially be ap- number of days. Figure 5 shows the results of a uv-coverage plied to enhance the sensitivity of each VLBI element (e.g., simulation for a seven-day observation. Due to the at- Alef et al. 2011; Oyama et al. 2016; Kim et al. 2018). mospheric phase fluctuations, there may not be so many However, such a high data rate transmission on a radio ground stations that can practically make VLBI observa- link is unrealistic (for comparison, the VSOP and Ra- tions at the 350-GHz band (e.g., the James Clerk Maxwell dioAstron satellites achieve rates of 0.128 Gbps). Thus, Telescope (JCMT) or Submillimeter Array at Mauna Kea, to achieve next generation space VLBI, further innova- the South Pole Telescope (SPT), the Large Millimetre Tele- tions such as optical communication are required. Such scope (LMT), and the phased-up ALMA at Atacama). sensitivity improvement is crucial to balloon-borne/space The uv-coverage made by these four ground-based tele- VLBI because the physical diameter of an on-board ra- scopes is shown in Figure 5 (a). We here consider a long- dio telescope within the payload must be limited to a duration balloon flight over Antarctica, which would typi- few meters or less at submillimeter/THz regimes. In the cally take two weeks to circumnavigate the South Pole once case of a 2-m diameter for a balloon-borne VLBI tele- (e.g., Seo et al., 2008). Figure 5 (b) shows the improve- scope (SEFD = 130, 000 Jy, an aperture efficiency of ments obtained by adding one Antarctic-orbiting balloon- 63%, T = 100 K), the 7-sigma fringe detection sensi- borne station, while Figure 5 (c) shows the improvements sys tivities at 350 GHz between the balloon–ground baselines obtained by adding one ground-based station to the Antarc- are expected to be ∼ 400 mJy and 50 mJy toward the tica region. Compared to the six baselines achievable with 12-m ALMA telescope (SEFD = 6000 Jy) and phased-up four stations in case (a), in case (b), the number of base- ALMA (SEFD = 100 Jy; Matthews et al. 2018), respec- lines is increased by 28 (to a total of 34), corresponding to tively. We assume here a data recording rate of 64 Gbps an array of approximately nine ground-based stations. By (e.g., Kim et al. 2018) and the integration of 10 sec. contrast, in case (c) the number of baselines has increased Another advantage of balloon-borne stations is their by only four (to a total of 10). Thus, adding a circum- mobility. One factor that influences image quality is the polar balloon station can lead to a significant increase in distribution and density of the sampling space, which is the number of daily baselines. This benefit peculiar to the called “uv-coverage”. The uv-coverage represents the as- use of moving stations has been produced by platforms sembly of trajectories of baseline vectors seen from an such as the VSOP and the RadioAstron satellites. Image observed celestial target. The number of trajectories is quality plays an important role in imaging astrophysical expected to be N(N − 1)/2, where N is the number of phenomena with complex shapes, such as black hole shad- ground-based stations. Because ground-based VLBI uti- ows. A significant increase in the number of baselines could 11 Figure 6: Simulations of uv-coverages of 24 h space VLBI observation toward the Galactic center. The observing Frequency is 230 GHz. (a) Eight ground-based stations without space VLBI. (b) One space VLBI station on a low-Earth orbit (altitude 500 km) and eight ground- based stations. be a decisive factor in the evolution of black hole science number of baselines by observation days. This benefit through high-fidelity/quality imaging. cannot be obtained with conventional arrays that solely Based on the effectiveness of the balloon-borne VLBI, comprise ground-based stations. it can be expected to develop into a satellite-based VLBI as a future mission (Palumbo et al., 2018). Figure 6 shows Acknowledgments uv-coverage simulations for a space VLBI at 230 GHz over 24 h generated using the Astronomical Radio Interferom- Our deep appreciation goes to Kanaguchi, M., Miyaji, Y., eter Simulator (ARIS; Asaki et al., 2007). Although a dif- Komori, A., Kobayashi, H., Ogi, Y., Takefuji, K., Tsuboi, M., ferent configuration of ground telescopes (potential eight and Manabe, T., Aoki, T., for their invaluable supports stations; e.g., Asada et al. 2017) is used in this simulation, to this project. A special note of thanks to all the staff important improvements are achieved through the use of involved in the development and operation of the Taiki a low-Earth orbit for the satellite, which at an altitude of Aerospace Research Field (TARF), a facility of the Japan 500 km would take only 94 min to orbit the Earth. As Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA); especially, we re- this equates to 15 orbits of the Earth over 24 h, which is ceived generous support from Yoshida, T. Saito, Y., Koy- equivalent to D = 15 in Equation 1, the number of base- anagi, K., and Sasaki, A. Scientific Ballooning Research lines increases significantly for even one observational day and Operation Group and the laboratory of infrared astro- theoretically. physics offer development infrastructures in the Sagami- hara campus of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), which is a branch of JAXA. We are also 6. Conclusion grateful to the staff and students involved in the develop- The balloon-borne VLBI station has been developed for ment and operation of the Mizusawa VLBI Observatory of performing radio interferometry in the stratosphere, where the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the radio telescope is free from atmospheric effects. The which is a branch of the National Institutes of Natural Sci- first launch from TARF was canceled owing to changes in ences (NINS). The Mizusawa VLBI Observatory is respon- the wind condition at ground level. The rescheduled single sible for the operations of the correlator for the balloon- element flight will be a technical feasibility demonstration borne VLBI experiment. A large part of the large pressur- of the balloon-borne VLBI by establishing balloon–ground ized vessel (PVL) has also been developed at the Mizusawa baselines at ∼ 20 GHz as the first step. VLBI Observatory: we appreciate the contributions of This paper described the system design and develop- Matsueda, C., Asakura, Y., Matsukawa, Y., Nagayama, T., ment of a series of observing instruments and bus systems. Nakamura, H., Nishikawa, T., and Yamada, R. The en- The characteristics of system configuration are that two couragement from the Japan VLBI Consortium committee critical devices for a VLBI station, namely, the frequency were invaluable for continuing the development activities standard clock and the data recorder, are mounted on- of this experiment. Part of this activity is carried out un- board. This configuration maximizes the recording band- der the collaborative research agreement between RIKEN width and observation time without being limited by the and JAXA. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI, uplink/downlink of the ground tracking station. Further- Grant Numbers 26120537, 17H02874(AD), 16K05305 (YK), more, the mobility of the balloon-borne VLBI station can the Casio Science Promotion Foundation (AD), the In- improve the spatial sampling coverage by increasing the amori Foundation (YK), and the Sasakawa Scientific Re- 12 search Grant (SN). This study was partially supported by M., Scott, D., Semisch, C., Truch, M., Tucker, C., Tucker, G., Turner, A. D., Weibe, D., Oct. 2004. The Balloon-borne Large JAXA’s competitive grants for Strategic Basic Research Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). In: Bradford, C. M., and Development (HT) and Expense for Basic Develop- Ade, P. A. R., Aguirre, J. E., Bock, J. J., Dragovan, M., Duband, ment of On-board Instruments and Experiment (YK). L., Earle, L., Glenn, J., Matsuhara, H., Naylor, B. J., Nguyen, H. T., Yun, M., Zmuidzinas, J. (Eds.), Z-Spec: a broadband millimeter-wave grating spectrometer: design, construction, and first cryogenic measurements. Vol. 5498 of Proc. 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Abstract

The balloon-borne very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment is a technical feasibility study for performing radio interferometry in the stratosphere. The flight model has been developed. A balloon-borne VLBI station will be launched to establish interferometric fringes with ground-based VLBI stations distributed over the Japanese islands at an observing frequency of approximately 20 GHz as the first step. This paper describes the system design and development of a series of observing instruments and bus systems. In addition to the advantages of avoiding the atmospheric effects of absorption and fluctuation in high frequency radio observation, the mobility of a station can improve the sampling coverage (“uv-coverage”) by increasing the number of baselines by the number of ground-based counterparts for each observation day. This benefit cannot be obtained with conventional arrays that solely comprise ground-based stations. The balloon-borne VLBI can contribute to a future progress of research fields such as black holes by direct imaging. Keywords: balloon, interferometry, satellite system, radio telescopes, radio astronomy, black holes 1. Introduction Received 28 May 2018, Revised 20 August 2018, Accepted 14 Cosmic radio waves are degraded during their propaga- September 2018 tion through Earth’s atmosphere because of atmospheric Corresponding authors Email addresses: akihiro.doi@vsop.isas.jaxa.jp (Akihiro attenuation that reduces the radio signals, atmospheric Doi), kono.yusuke@nao.ac.jp (Yusuke Kono) Preprint submitted to Advances in Space Research December 12, 2018 arXiv:1812.04255v1 [astro-ph.IM] 11 Dec 2018 radiation that increases the effective system noise of a re- been launched into the stratosphere. Note that position ceiving telescope, and atmospheric fluctuation in the time determination to an accuracy of . 1/20 in terms of observ- domain that degrades radio wave coherence. The column ing wavelength for each element is crucial for accumulat- density fluctuation of water vapor in the tropospheric flow ing radio signal to establish interferometric fringes. This is the primary cause of phase fluctuation in the interfer- requirement represents a primary technical challenge for ometry response of radio telescopes. The Atacama Large maintaining the phase stability of stratospheric VLBI us- Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) on Chajnantor ing drifting balloons, which experience pendulum motion plateau, Chile is located at an altitude of approximately and string vibration between the balloon and the gondola. 5,000 m, where the amount of precipitable water vapor is The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) is typically 1.0 mm and falls below 0.5 mm up to 25% of the a balloon-borne radio interferometer that is used to in- time . ALMA has interferometric baselines of up to 16 km vestigate radio pulses originating from the interactions of for observations at ∼ 70–960 GHz. Intercontinental base- cosmic ray air showers based on correlations between an- lines using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) tech- tenna elements located on a single gondola platform (Anita niques have been established at 230 GHz (λ1.3 mm) by the Collaboration et al., 2009). Far-infrared interferometry Event Horizon Telescope project (Doeleman et al., 2009). experiments, the Far-Infrared Interferometric Experiment The primary aim of the project is to image black hole (FITE; Shibai et al. 2010) and the Balloon Experimen- shadows, although observing frequencies of higher than tal Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII; 300 GHz (submillimeter wave) might be required for clear Rinehart et al. 2014), will employ a meter class baseline imaging to avoid opacity effects and interstellar scattering between two individual mirror elements located on the through the atmospheres (accreting material) surrounding same gondola. Overall, maintaining a correct working re- black holes (Falcke et al., 2000). On the ground, submil- lationship between individual interferometry elements in limeter VLBIs are potentially available at a limited num- the stratosphere at submillimeter/THz regimes represents ber of telescopes on sites in particularly good conditions a significant technical challenge. The dynamical fluctua- at high altitudes. tions in a balloon-borne platform can also affect the phase The VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP; Hirabayassthaibility of the frequency standard clock, which is a criti- et al. 1998) and RadioAstron (Kardashev et al., 2013) cal component of VLBI system. Furthermore, maintaining have established space VLBI missions in which a single the pointing stability required to track a target source de- space-based radio telescope makes baselines to ground- mands careful treatment. Individual radio interferometric based telescopes at ≦ 22 GHz. The purpose of these mis- elements generally comprise a single heterodyne receiver sions is not to reduce atmospheric effects but to expand on a high gain antenna with a diameter of at least a few baseline lengths beyond the Earth’s diameter. Although meters, thus resulting in a beam width of the order of an submilllimeter/tera-hertz (THz) interferometry can be po- arcminute or less, then making absolute pointing accuracy tentially available between space–space baselines through (and not just stability) is required. For the BLAST tele- the use of multiple satellites, it would be expensive. Scien- scope, a pointing accuracy of less than 5 arcsec r.m.s. has tific balloons can typically reach stratospheric altitudes of been achieved in raster mapping (Pascale et al., 2008); ∼ 20–40 km, which are above 99.9% of the atmosphere’s however, the dynamical fluctuation of the gondola plat- water content, and balloon-borne radio telescopes realize form necessitated post-flight pointing reconstruction. observing sites that are essentially equivalent to space in In this paper, we present the configuration of observ- terms of radio observations. ing systems and gondola bus systems on the flight model Many balloon-borne single-dish submillimeter telescope of a balloon-borne VLBI station that is to be used in a missions have been launched to observe the cosmic mi- technical feasibility study for future stratospheric interfer- crowave background. Several such missions— Archeops ometric missions. The flight model was developed at the (Benoit et al., 2002), BOOMERanG (Crill et al., 2003), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) in Sagami- and EBEX (Reichborn-Kjennerud et al., 2010)—used off- hara and at the National Astronomical Observatory of axis 1.3–1.5-m Gregorian telescopes to scan a wide field us- Japan (NAOJ) in Mizusawa and Mitaka, Japan. In Sec- ing a bolometer array located in the focal plane. Observa- tion 2, we describe the concept of the test flight model tions at high angular resolutions were made by PRONAOS as a balloon-borne VLBI station. In Sections 3 and 4, (Serra et al., 2002) and BLAST (Devlin et al., 2004), two the configuration and development of the observing sys- balloon-borne experiments employing 2 m class, on-axis tem and gondola bus system are described. In Section 5, Cassegrain-type telescopes. Thus, balloon-borne submil- we briefly discuss the experiment. Finally, the conclusion limeter radio telescopes have been technically established. is presented in Section 6. Such a platform could potentially serve as a VLBI station if it were equipped with a VLBI backend system. How- 2. Concept of experiment ever, to date, no individual interferometric element has This paper discusses the first attempt to achieve VLBI observation using a stratospheric balloon. The results of https://almascience.eso.org/about-alma/atmosphere-model 2 (a) (b) (c) (d) Figure 1: Four side views of the balloon-borne VLBI station. Sun shields and ballast boxes are not described in this model. (a) Front view, (b) Side view, (c) back view, and (d) top view. this experimental engineering mission is valuable to evalu- emission and/or H O maser line emission from astronom- ate the technical feasibility of future VLBI using balloon- ical objects may be observed as secondary targets if extra borne radio telescopes. The technical challenges are as time is available at the level flight. follows: (1) implementing an on-board frequency standard The balloon-borne VLBI station is scheduled to be launched clock; (2) implementing an on-board VLBI data recorder; from the Taiki Aerospace Research Field (TARF; Fuke (3) controlling the pointing of the telescope; (4) determin- et al., 2010), a scientific balloon facility operated by JAXA ing the position of the VLBI element under the environ- in Hokkaido, Japan. A scientific B30 balloon (30, 000 m ), mental conditions of the balloon-borne platform. fabricated by Fujikura Co., Ltd., will be used. After as- As the first step, a single-element balloon-borne VLBI cending for 0.5 h and drifting eastward for 1.5 hours at an station with a radio telescope and K-band (∼ 20 GHz, altitude of ∼ 12 km in a so-called boomerang flight op- λ1.5 cm) receivers are employed (four side views and a pho- eration (Nishimura and Hirosawa, 1981), the balloon will tograph of the station are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respec- reach a level altitude of 26 km, at which it will remain for tively). Several ground-based VLBI stations distributed 1.5 h or more for experimental VLBI observations. The over the Japanese islands are incorporated as counterparts total platform weight, not including a 180 kg ballast, is of VLBI elements to form baselines ranging from ∼ 50 to approximately 600 kg. The specifications of the observing ∼ 1, 000 km in length during the flight. The ground-based and bus systems are listed in Table 1. radio telescopes used in test observations in 2017 were the Mizusawa 10 m (Kameya et al., 1996; Shibata et al., 1994) 3. Observing Systems operated by NAOJ, the Takahagi 32 m (Yonekura et al., 2016) operated by the Center for Astronomy, Ibaraki Uni- A block diagram of the on-board observing and bus versity, the Kashima 34 m (Sekido and Kawai, 2014) op- systems is shown in Figure 4. erated by the National Institute of Information and Com- munications Technology (NICT), the Usuda 10 m oper- 3.1. Antenna ated by JAXA, and the Osaka Prefecture University 1.8 m The antenna is a Cassegrain-focal design with primary telescope (Figure 3). As a primary target, we utilize an and secondary mirror diameters of 1, 500 and 200 mm, re- artificial signal source of the geostationary satellite “IP- spectively, and a primary focal length of 488.7 mm. These STAR” (or “THAICOM-4”), which appears across a fre- optics parameters have been determined to utilize an ex- quency range of ∼ 19.6–20.2 GHz and includes a beacon isting fabrication design of the primary mirror. To en- at 20.199827 GHz. The IPSTAR signal is very strong and hance its rigidity, the parabolic primary mirror is com- allows us to perform measurements at a high signal-to- posed of two 3-mm thick layers of aluminum (A1100), noise ratio (SNR), thus it is useful to evaluate of the phase which are 1, 500 and 455 mm in diameter, respectively. stability of the on-board VLBI components. Continuum 3 The two parabolas were formed through a cold working process using a spinning machine manufactured by Kita- jima Shibori Seisakusho Co., Ltd. Based on a structural modeling analysis, the maximum expected self-weight de- formation is 0.2 mm at a point on the outer edge of the primary mirror. The surface accuracy of the primary re- flector is ∼ 0.25 mm r.m.s. including a self-weight defor- mation at the elevation of 10 deg, which was measured by photogrametry using V-STARS together with PRO-SPOT Target Projector to an accuracy of 0.03 mm. Therefore, the surface efficiency is expected to be 95.7% at 20 GHz. A subreflector unit with a tripod stay structure was attached during the measurement. The secondary mirror is 200 mm in diameter and is fabricated from aluminum A5052 via a machining process. Through laser scanning measurement, the secondary mirror surface accuracy was measured to be 30 µ m r.m.s. A corrugated horn has half-angle of 11.7 deg and illuminates the main reflector with an edge level of −10 dB. The optically designed aperture efficiency is 0.59, and the spillover loss is estimated to be 0.06. The blocking efficiency of the subreflector unit is ∼ 0.05, thus resulting in a calculated effective radio telescope aperture efficiency of 0.50. The primary beam size at the frequency ranges to be used for observations of IPSTAR and the astronomical radio sources is ∼ 0.6 deg. In order to reduce thermal de- formation due to solar heat input, the front and rear sides of the primary mirror were painted white. 3.2. Frontend: Receivers The front end (FE) systems are contained within an aluminum box, called “FEBOX,” that mechanically sup- ports the antenna as a load path using a rotating ele- Figure 2: Photograph of the balloon-borne VLBI station during a hanging test in the assembly room in JAXA TARF. Sun shields and vation axis. The dual circular K-band polarization re- ballast boxes are not attached to the gondola at this time. The Taiki ceiving system comprises a septum-type polarizer (Kaiden 1.5-m ground-based station is shown on the left. et al., 2009), a Weinreb’s low-noise amplifier (LNA) man- ufactured by the Caltech Microwave Research Group, a MITEQ LNA for left-handed circular polarization (LHCP), and a B&Z LNA and a MITEQ LNA for right-handed cir- cular polarization (RHCP). The LHCP and RHCP signals are joined in a combiner and are subsequently transferred together at a radio frequency (RF) regime to the exterior Balloon-Borne VLBI Station of FEBOX. The system minimizes the amount of mechan- ical twisting torque by employing a single co-axial RF ca- ble passing through the elevation axis via a rotary joint Mizusawa 10 m (Section 4.3). Single circular polarization observations are (NAOJ) Taiki 1.5 m made via the alternate use of LHCP/RHCP by depowering the respective LNAs. Only LHCP observation is planned Usuda 10 m (JAXA) for nominal use in matching the ground-based station re- Takahagi 32 m (Ibaraki University) ceivers as VLBI counterparts, thus relegating the RHCP Osaka Prefecture University receiver to the status of a standby redundant system. Note 1.8 m Kashima 34 m (NICT) that the IPSTAR signal comes in a linear polarization, while most astronomical radio sources are almost perfectly unpolarized. Each receiver has an efficiency of 1/2 toward Figure 3: VLBI network for test observations in 2017. the IPSTAR signal and astronomical radio sources. The Geodetic Systems, Inc. 4 system LHCP noise temperature has been measured to be herence within unit integration time. Integration time is approximately 320 K. The assumed antenna aperture ef- necessary to obtain sufficient signal to noise ratio to de- ficiency of 0.50 (Section 3.1) corresponds to an expected tect interferometric fringes, which is typically 10 seconds system equivalent flux density (SEFD) of ∼ 1 × 10 jan- or more for VLBI observations. The ground-based VLBI sky (Jy) for the telescope; the SEFD in RHCP is slightly stations use a hydrogen maser atomic clock (H-maser) worse than that in LHCP owing to the receiver’s noise tem- that satisfies this requirement; however, factors, such as perature differences between the respective LNAs. The weight, physical size, and environmental conditions, dic- fringe detection sensitivities are presented in Section 3.4. tate the use of different resources for clocks mounted on a flying object. As a standard frequency generator for the 3.3. Intermediate frequency Division balloon-borne VLBI, we adopted an 8607-B series OCXO, The platform’s intermediate frequency (IF) systems are which represents the second generation of OCXOs devel- contained in an aluminum box, called “IFBOX,” located oped by Oscilloquartz SA using the technique of housing on the exposed section of the gondola base frame. The a state-of-the-art Boitier Vieillissement Ameliore (BVA) RF signal is split through a divider into two bandpass fil- stress compensation cut (SC-cut) crystal resonator and its ters, with down-conversions to IF signals made using a associated oscillator components within double oven tech- first local (LO) reference signal at 21.0 GHz. A phase- nology. The Allan standard deviation of the frequency −14 locked dielectric resonator oscillator (hereafter referred to stability is lower than 8× 10 at τ = 1–30 sec. We con- as PLO) manufactured by the Nexyn Corporation gener- ducted a comparison between two OCXO8607s and several ates the first LO in synchronization with a 5 MHz reference atomic clocks based on VLBI experimental observations at signal. Following amplification and transmission from IF- 230 GHz. The evaluation results are reported in a sepa- BOX, the two IF signals are supplied to respective wide- rate paper (Kono et al., submitted). In the balloon-borne and narrow-band data recording systems (Section 3.4). VLBI platform, the OCXO8607 is installed within the PVS IFBOX also contains a distributor that supplies 5 and (Section 4.1). 10 MHz reference signals using a 5 MHz reference from the Two VLBI data acquisition systems that can operate oven-controlled crystal oscillator (OCXO) in a small pres- simultaneously are employed for the experiment. The first surized vessel (PVS; Section 3.4) located on the outside of system is a wide-band VLBI system for observing both IFBOX. IFBOX is entirely covered with polystyrene foam IPSTAR and astronomical objects. Four base-band sig- to reduce the influence of sharp temperature changes in the nals (Section 3.3), each with a 512 MHz bandwidth, are outside environment. A chamber test of IFBOX in which sampled using an ADS3000+ analog-to-digital sampler de- the stratospheric environment was simulated in terms of veloped by the National Institute of Information and Com- ambient temperature and pressure was conducted to con- munications Technology (NICT). The sampling is initially firm the functionality of the filters, amplifiers, and PLO. performed in 8-bit quantization, and the data are subse- The IF signal used for wide-band observation is trans- quently resampled in a 2-bit quantization at the Nyquist mitted to a large pressurized vessel (PVL) and divided sampling rate after level adjustment, thus resulting in an and filtered into four baseband channels (BBCs) in the aggregated bit rate of 8.192 Gbps. The digitized data are ranges 1, 024–1, 536, 512–1, 024, 1, 024–1, 536, and 1, 536– recorded at 8.192 Gbps using a mission-dedicated VLBI 2, 048 MHz, corresponding, respectively, to RFs of: 19.464– software recorder that was developed by upgrading a VS- 19.976 GHz, 19.976–20.488 GHz, 22.024–22.536 GHz, and REC VLBI recorder that is being developed by NAOJ 22.536–23.048 GHz. The IPSTAR observation is performed (Oyama et al., 2012). The improvements involve replac- using the first two BBCs, while astronomical observation ing the VSREC hard disk drives with solid-state drives is performed using all four BBCs. The IF signal for the (SSDs) of 4 TB for data and 0.5 TB for operating system narrow band of observation is sent to a mid-sized pressur- and reducing the energy consumption rate by introducing ized vessel (PVM) and down-converted using the second a new motherboard (Skylake ) and CPU. Hereafter, we LO reference signal to a 0–32 MHz BBC, corresponding to refer to this dedicated VSREC as “VSREC.” The wide- an RF of 19.660–19.692 GHz for its use in IPSTAR obser- band VLBI system is installed within the PVL. With the vation. As the second LO generator, a Pilulu833 phase- 8 Gbps recording rate, the 7-sigma fringe detection sensi- 3 6 locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer module using an tivities of the baseline between the balloon-borne station HMC833 integrated circuit (IC) is employed. The second and Takahagi 32 m ground-based telescope is expected to LO is locked in synchronization with a 10 MHz reference be ∼ 3–10 Jy (T = 40–500 K; Yonekura et al. 2016). sys,32m signal to generate the 2nd LO frequency 1.34 GHz. We assume the integration of 1 sec. In our plan for the flight experiment, 3C 454.3 or 3C 84 (∼ 20 Jy) is observed 3.4. Backend: VLBI Systems as a target of the astronomical object. The frequency standard clock device used for VLBI Intel Corporation. observations is required to have stability to maintain co- The theoretical baseline sensitivity (1-sigma) is defined as −1 0.5 η (SEF D SEF D /(2Bτ)) in Jy, where η(≈ 0.8) is a correla- i j Denshiken Co., Ltd. tion efficiency, B is the bandwidth in Hz, and τ is the integration Hittite Microwave Corporation time in sec. 5 FEBOX PVL PVM GPS Antennas RF signal IFBOX POL RHCP LHCP GPS RX RX (R) RX (L) 1PPS I/F signal D/C 19G HYB 1PPS SW 21.0 GHz 1PPS HYB 1PPS RF signal BB I/F signal 10GbE RF BOX ADS3000+ VSREC K5VSSP32 D/C 22G D/C PLO lock Monior SAS PVS 1.34GHz 10 MHz 21.0 GHz PLO SSD SYNTH USB2 OCXO REF DIST NUC/PC 10 MHz 5 MHz Figure 4: Block diagram of the observing systems for balloon-borne VLBI station. Abbreviations in the figure are as follows. POL: polarizer, RX: Receiver for low-noise amplifiers, HYB: hybrid coupler, D/C: downconverter, REF DIST: reference signal distributor, SYNTH: synthesizer, SW: switch, BB: base band signals. The other VLBI system, which operates within the the radio telescope that is to be launched in the experi- PVM, is a narrow-band system that employs the a K5/VSSP32ment. VLBI sampler, which is developed by NICT (Kondo et al., 2006). A base-band signal with a bandwidth of 32 MHz is 4. Bus Systems sampled in a 2-bit quantization at the Nyquist sampling 4.1. Pressurized Vessels rate, thus resulting in an aggregated bit rate of 128 Mbps. The ambient pressure and temperature in the strato- Although using K5/VSSP32 makes 256 Mbps in two IFs sphere are expected to be ∼ 1/50 atm and ∼ −50 C, re- available, only one IF includes the most significant compo- spectively, during the level flight of the platform. Because nent in the IPSTAR signal at an RF of 19.675 GHz. The R many commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products are used digitized data are recorded on the SSD of an Intel Next for the experiment, the three pressure vessels (PVs) dis- Unit of Computing (NUC) mini PC. cussed in the previous sections are used to maintain en- To achieve time adjustment, the ADS3000+ and K5/VSSP32 vironmental conditions similar to those on the ground of samplers are synchronized to a 10 MHz reference signal ∼ 1 atm and room temperature. All the PVs are made during observation and with a 1 pulse-per-second (1PPS) of 4-mm thick domes and 11-mm thick aluminum (A5052) signal of the global positioning system (GPS) before obser- base plates fabricated by Kitajima Shibori Seisakusho Co., vation. Linear and quadratic drifts of the OCXO clock will Ltd. The PV domes and base plates are sealed together cause time offset to change. Off-line procedures of fringe by tightening them with a mechanical clamp, and the base search/fitting are applied in correlation/data-reduction pro- plates are equipped with several hermetic connectors for cesses after the observation. power supply lines, signal lines and co-axial cables. Two air cocks are also attached on each base plate for gas re- 3.5. Power detector and spectrometer placement of air potentially containing moisture by dry We designed the VLBI element so that it can be also nitrogen before the launch. used as a single telescope by adding a power detector soft- The small pressurized vessel (PVS) has a diameter of ware and a spectrometry software. The software processes 400 mm and a height of 271 mm. It contains the com- the digitized data acquired by K5/VSSP32 in which a ponents that require temperature stability, including the base-band signal with a width of 32 MHz in semi-real-time OCXO, the three-axis gyroscopes, and the three-axis ac- with delay of 0.8 seconds every 0.1 second. The power de- celerometers. Much of the internal volume of the PVS tector software calculates the square mean. We intend to is filled with a thermal insulating material to prevent the use the detector output for observations of the continuum devices from suffering rapid changes of temperature. The emissions of the Moon and Sun. The spectrometry soft- exterior is an unpainted aluminum surface that is expected ware calculates the power spectrum by FFT processing to to be insensitive to ambient radiation fields. output the power ratio of the carrier component the IP- The PVM has a diameter of 400 mm and a height of STAR signal to the adjacent noisy back ground spectrum. 611 mm and contains several Raspberry Pi operational At the location of TARF in the eastern part of Hokkaido, PCs (OPCs) for command/telemetry operation, attitude IPSTAR has been detected at approximately 2–3 dB using Raspberry Pi Foundation. 6 Table 1: Specifications of observing and bus systems for balloon-borne VLBI experiment. Parameters Unit Value Antenna diameter meter 1.5 Surface accuracy RMS mm 0.25 Aperture efficiency 0.50 System noise temperature T Kelvin 320 sys System equivalent flux density (SEFD) Jy 1,006,000 Observing frequency (mode A) GHz 19.660–19.692 Observing frequency (mode B) GHz 19.464–20.488 Observing frequency (mode C) GHz 19.464–20.488 22.024–23.048 Half-power beam width (HPBW) degree 0.64 1st local oscillator frequency GHz 21.000 Analog-to-digital conversion quantization bit 2 Recording rate (mode A) Gbps 0.128 Recording rate (mode B) Gbps 4.096 Recording rate (mode C) Gbps 8.192 SSD media capacity Tbyte 4 Dimension of gondola base frame (W×D×H) meter 2.60 × 1.40 × 4.18 Total weight (dry) kg 608 Ballast weight kg 180 Battery capacity Wh 5320 Power consumption (typical) W 370 Including the optics efficiency, the reflection loss, the blocking factor, and the spill over loss. Including an pointing error of 0.21 degree at maximum. Defined at the center frequency of mode B. determination (Section 4.2), attitude control (Section 4.3), full operation without fan activation, the air temperature and housekeeping. In addition, the PVM houses the GPS eventually increased to a hazardous level (> 40 C); how- compass receiver, the downconverter, a 1PPS distributor, ever, the air temperature maintained at ∼ +15 C during one of the two VLBI systems (K5/VSSP32; Section 3.4), fan activation, which was expected based on our analytical three Ethernet switching hubs, and relay array modules to thermal design. power on/off controls and reboot dysfunctional devices. 4.2. Attitude Determination Systems The PVL has a diameter of 550 mm and a height of 788 mm and contains the wide-band VLBI system that The attitude determination system (ADS) provides op- comprises the ADS3000+ and VSREC (Section 3.4). The erational attitude determination (OPC-AD) under the con- following two conflicting requirements make the thermal trol of a Raspberry Pi 3 model B installed within the design of this unit difficult. The considerable power con- PVM. The function of the OPC-AD is to collect informa- sumption (∼ 280 W) of these two instruments results in tion from the attitude sensors, calculate an attitude deter- a high rate of heat generation during their recording op- mination solution, and subsequently send attitude control eration. On the other hand, the retention of startup tem- commands to the operational PC for the attitude control perature condition is required during standby operation system (OPC-AC; Section 4.3). to obtain power saving (∼ 40 W) before VLBI observa- The attitude determination solutions in the azimuth tions. Owing to this dilemma in thermal design, we de- (AZ) angle are calculated by combining the outputs of a cided to place actively controlled fans between a heat dis- coarse sensor and a fine sensor through a complementary sipating compartment and a thermally insulated compart- filter. We use a JG-35F fiber optic gyro (FOG) as the ment, resulting in a dual-compartment PVL. The exterior fine AZ-axis sensor. The FOG has a resolution of a few surface of the PVL dome is painted white to aid in ra- arcseconds, and a coarse sensor that is less accurate but diation cooling. The assembly performed quite well in a provides an absolute angle is used to compensate for ap- thermal vacuum test in which an environment equivalent parent velocity drift in the gyro output. OPC-AD can se- to that during a level flight was simulated. The air tem- lect an on-board GPS compass, a geomagnetometer, or a perature of the thermally insulated compartment contain- ing the VLBI instruments did not decrease below ∼ 0 C Developed by Raspberry Pi Foundation. during the standby mode. As the instruments went into Japan Aviation Electronics Industry, Ltd. 7 solar angle sensor as the input to the complementary filter. stratosphere with these test models, although these are The GPS compass uses a PolaRx2e@ GPS receiver cou- not used for on-flight attitude determination in this ex- pled with one L1/L2 antenna and two L1 antennas . This periment. The star trackers in the daytime stratosphere compass configuration has been previously used in flight requests designed to prevent saturation due to foreground in the pGAPS experiment at TARF (Fuke et al., 2014). A radiation from the sky. Based on the conceptual design three-axis MAG-03 MS magnetic sensor is used as the of DayStar (Truesdale et al., 2013), we fabricated the fol- geomagnetometer; previously, it was used in flight and sub- lowing two daytime star trackers to be used as cameras to sequently retrieved from the sea in an ISAS balloon-borne detect star images: UI-3370CP-NIR-GL using a CMO- 15 16 infrared astronomy mission. The sun sensor is an imaging SIS image sensor and UI-1240ML-NIR-GL using an 17 18 camera based on a Raspberry Pi camera board with a field E2V image sensor with an LP610 red longpass filter of view of approximately 60 × 50 deg. The resulting out- with a cut-on wavelength of λ610 nm to reduce the blue put from the complementary filter has several arcseconds sky foreground. The trackers are equipped with baffles; to of stability and an absolute accuracy of ∼ 0.1–1 deg. enable an obstruction light avoidance of 12 degrees, they The attitude determination solutions in the elevation have lengths of approximately 400 mm and square aper- (EL) angle are also calculated using a complementary fil- tures of roughly 120 mm. In the stratosphere, we perform ter. As a fine sensor along the EL axis, CRH02-025 silicon a star shooting test at various sun angles and altitudes in- ring gyroscope sensors based on micro-electro-mechanical cluding ascent. In order to evaluate the design concepts of system technology are mounted on the radio telescope’s the baffle and camera system, we measure the sun angle frame. The EL gyro has a resolution of a few arcseconds dependence of stray light and the relationship between the and the pitch output from the three-axis geomagnetome- star magnitude and SNR, respectively. ter is used as one of the inputs of the complementary filter The pitch and roll orientations of the gondola base to compensate for the apparent velocity drift of the gyro frame are monitored by CRH01-025 and CRS39-02 sili- output. Note that the geomagnetometer is located on the con ring gyroscope sensors , an LCF-23102-D tilt meter, gondola base frame, and the difference in coordinate sys- an LCF-25302-D accelerometer , and a MMA84513-D ac- tem between the telescope and gondola frames is compen- celerometer, all of which are installed in the PVS (Sec- sated by the optical encoder used for driving the EL drive tion 4.1). Orientation is achieved with respect to the fol- (Section 4.3). In other words, the attitude determination lowing two frames: an pendulum orientation defined with in EL is not affected by the pitch component in the pendu- respect to the gravity vector, and a static orientation de- lum motion between the balloon and the gondola as both fined with respect to the flight train direction based on the gyroscope and the geomagnetometer are influenced by the imbalance in the mass distribution following ballast the inertial space system. Thus, the output from the com- discharge. Gyro sensors respond the former component, plementary EL filter also has several arcseconds of stability while accelerometers sense the latter one. If static orien- and an absolute accuracy of ∼ 0.1–1 deg. tations with respect to the AZ gyroscope’s axis remain in As the primary beam size of the radio telescope is ap- pitch and roll, a fraction of the pendulum motion would proximately 0.5 deg at FWHM (Section 3.1), an absolute contaminate the output from the AZ gyroscope; therefore, angle determination accuracy of 0.1 deg angle is required a determination of the dynamical orientation by the OPC- for pointing to the target. As solely the output of the AD is necessary for real-time correction of the AZ deter- compensation filter does not satisfy this requirement, our mination by taking static orientation into account. operational strategy involves performing a raster scan on the sky centered on the predicted location of IPSTAR and 4.3. Attitude Control Systems (ACS) pointing to it using the output of the spectrometer (Sec- The radio telescope is driven on an azimuth–elevation tion 3.5). Following this, we calibrate the coarse sensors (AZ–EL) mount coordination system. Attitude control for subsequent observations of astronomical objects. As- along the AZ axis is achieved by yawing the entire gon- tronomical maser objects normally used in ground-based dola using a reaction wheel (RW) equipped at the center VLBI telescopes can not be used for pointing calibration of the gondola and is aided by the coarse “PIVOT” AZ due to insufficient sensitivity of the on-board radio tele- actuator located on top of the gondola. Pointing along scope. the EL is performed by rotating only the radio telescope We are planning to use star trackers for fine attitude frame. determination in future missions. In this experiment, two test models of the star tracker are mounted parallel to IDS Imaging Development Systems GmbH. the optical axis of the radio telescope to the back of the ams AG. secondary mirror. We will make shooting tests in the IDS Imaging Development Systems GmbH. Teledyne e2v (UK) Ltd. Midwest Optical Systems, Inc. Septentrio Satellite Navigation N.V. Silicon Sensing Systems Ltd. Sensor Systems Inc. Jewell Instruments LLC. Bartington Instruments Ltd. Silicon Sensing Systems Ltd. 8 All of the actuators have direct drive motors, which are to feedback control excitation. Note that at EL 6= 0 deg, it superior to mechanical geared motors as they (1) experi- is necessary to utilize two-axis gimbals to perform rolling ence no backlash, (2) are unbreakable even under an unex- along the EL to compensate for the drift in the antenna pectedly large external torque, and (3) provide quasi-free pointing arising from the pendulum motion in the roll di- rotation on demand by depowering to avoid the influence rection in practice (e.g., Ward and Deweese, 2003). For the of external disturbance torques. However, the direct drive initial flight test, the WASP-like mechanism in the gondola motors are both dimensionally larger and heavier than system has a single one-axis actuator along the EL. geared motors. Kollmorgen’s frameless brushless direct The performance of the attitude controls under hanging drive motors are applied to the RW (Model KBMS17H03- testing will be reported in a separate paper. D), PIVOT, and EL drives (KBMS43S02-B). Sixteen-bit incremental shaft encoders are used for RW and PIVOT 4.4. Position Determination (DFS60A-THAK65536 ), while a non-contact optical en- Fluctuation in the line-of-sight direction component of coder read-head and φ150-mm stainless steel ring with the position of the VLBI station degrades the coherence 20 µ m pitch graduations combination (Model Ti2601 and of the received radio wave. The fluctuation must be kept RESM20USA150 ) is used for the EL drive. The mo- below about 1/20 wavelength to maintain the coherence. tors are driven using digital servo drivers (“Whitsle ”) This is the requirement for signal integration during the controlled from the OPC-AC via RS232C serial communi- time needed to improve the SNR (typically 10 s or longer) cation at a rate of 10 Hz. for the fringe detections of astronomical radio sources. Our The PIVOT drive plays the following two roles: unload- approach is to estimate the position change using onboard ing over-accumulated momentum of the wheel and cancel- sensors and correct the received radio wave by rotating the ing the twisting torque that occurs when the flight train phase during correlation processing. connects to the balloon, which can rotate randomly at a We install an accelerometer in the radio telescope frame typical rate of ∼ 0.1 rpm going up to ∼ 1 rpm. By turn- along the telescope’s optical axis to estimate the posi- ing off PIVOT’s power until it needs to be activated for tion change successively by integrating the second-order unloading of accumulated RW momentum, the gondola’s output of the accelerometer. To do this, we use a JA- yawing should be practically free from the perturbation 40GA02 accelerometer , which has a sensitivity of up to torque generated by the balloon. A ground-based test re- 0.7 µ G. Based on a numerical simulation assuming com- sulted in a controlled stability of ∼ 0.01 deg in the AZ bined translational and pendulum motion involving shear control during the simultaneous activation of both the RW disturbances of wind speed, we expect a sequential position and PIVOT drives. determination accuracy ∼ 40 µ m for 10 µ G measurement Pointing control along the EL is performed by rotat- noise. Although the output of the accelerometer usually ing the radio telescope frame using the elevation actuator, includes systematic errors in offset and drift, these can be which was designed on the basis of the mechanical con- solved through fringe search processing of the interferom- cept of the Wallops ArcSecond Pointing (WASP) system eter. The output of the accelerometer is recorded along (Stuchlik, 2014, 2015). The WASP concept involves the with the time stamp during the VLBI observation and use of a shaft that is continuously rotating at a constant subsequently analyzed following observation and recovery. rate of ∼ 30 rpm, with both the gondola base frame and Another position determination method is to estimate the telescope frame floating on the rotating shaft via axial the pendulum angle of the balloon-gondola system by in- roll bearings. As a result of this configuration, no static tegrating the velocity output of the pitch component from friction should affect the telescope with respect to the gon- the gyroscope mounted on the gondola base frame and dola during the switch-backing of the pendulum, and the multiplying the result by the physical length of the pen- dynamic friction on the axial roll bearings on the left and dulum to obtain the change in position. Application of this right sides of the EL axis should somewhat balance each strategy in a VLBI observation using the flight model un- other. The radio telescope is balanced with respect to the der pendulum disturbance during hanging test produced EL axis by a counter weight. In principle, the telescope a detectable clear fringe; the results to be reported in a should remain fixed with respect to the inertial space coor- separate paper (Kono et al., submitted). dinates even if a disturbance, such as pendulum vibration is added to the gondola frame. Accordingly, the EL drive 4.4.1. Power Supply Unit motor is activated with a very slight force when a pointing As a power supply, the platform employs PC40138LFP- displacement occurs. A ground-based test resulted in a 25 15Ah lithium-ion battery cells (3.3 V, 15 Ah) using LiFePO4 controlled stability of ∼ 0.01 deg in the EL control during as the positive electrode material. Each battery module the pendulum motion of ∼ 1 deg or less, and we found no comprises eight series-connected cells, assembled by Wings signature of potentially increased pendulum motion owing Japan Aviation Electronics Industry, Ltd. SICK AG. Phoenix Silicon International Co. Renishaw plc. Elmo Motion Control Ltd. 9 Co. Ltd, producing 26.4 V and 396 Wh/module. The gon- aperture of the radio telescope from an elevation angle of dola is equipped with 14 modules connected in parallel, 60 deg or above, making this the practical elevation limit producing approximately 5,500 Wh in total. The typi- of the telescope. The pressurized vessels, battery box, and cal power consumption during level flight is expected to radio telescope are supported by aluminum frames and be 400 W, reaching a maximum of approximately 600 W. are further mechanically interfaced to the nodes of the The PC40138LFP-15Ah battery cell has a recommended trusses. As the linear thermal expansion coefficients of operational temperature range of −10–+55 C during dis- SUS304 and aluminum differ, the truss structure and alu- charge. We conducted discharge tests at ambient tempera- minum frame are fastened with a degree of freedom left to tures of −20, 0, and +25 C and found that approximately accommodate the expected direction of thermal deforma- 50, 75, and 100% of the total capacity, respectively, were tion. Because the entire gondola will be recovered from available under these conditions. the sea at the end of the flight mission, a float fabricated The battery modules and housekeeping electronics are from expanded polystyrene foam (550ℓ in volume) is en- contained within a W1, 250×D480×H270 mm aluminum closed within the truss structure, with an additional 90ℓ box manufactured by Shin Kowa Industry Co., Ltd . The expanded polystyrene float installed near PIVOT. Com- box is made doubly waterproof in the case it gets sub- bined with the volume of the pressurized container and merged in seawater to recover the gondola system through the battery box, the net buoyancy is equivalent to approx- the inclusion of a thermal insulation box fabricated from imately 1, 000ℓ. We analyzed the expected altitude after expanded polystyrene foam with thermostatically controlled landing with respect to the mass and buoyancy distribu- 27 30 heaters. Vent filters located on the boxes are used to tions using the Grasshopper and found that PIVOT, adjust the internal pressure to conform to altitude-related which is the point that will be grappled by the crane of the changes. A thermal vacuum test conducted in a chamber- recovery ship, should float on the sea surface. The overall recreated stratospheric environment resulted in an internal gondola structure will either float with the antenna facing temperature of ∼ 10 C, which is consistent with the pre- downward (with a 70% probability) or with it facing up- dictions of our numerical thermal analysis. ward (30% probability). Four ballast boxes are installed at both lower sides of the gondola base frame, and approx- 4.4.2. Gondola Structure imately 180 kg of iron powder will be loaded as ballast. The gondola base frame was designed to meet require- ments in terms of weight, strength (including low-temperature 5. Discussion environments), nonmagnetism, the field of view of the tele- scope, and cost. The solution we obtained was a boat- The balloon-borne VLBI station described in this pa- shaped truss structure formed from SUS304 pipe rods, per has been fully developed. A first launch attempt from which helped to increase the specific rigidity of the gon- TARF was scheduled on July 24, 2017, but it was can- dola base frame. As our initial survey indicated that no celed owing to changes in the wind condition at ground commercially available truss system could satisfy our re- level. Through technical tests conducted at TARF be- quirements from the perspectives of weight and cost, we fore and after the event, interferometric fringes were suc- used Technotrass building structural parts developed cessfully detected in all the baselines of the balloon-borne by TechnoSystems. Twelve varieties of pipe rods with di- VLBI station (under pendulum disturbance) toward the ameters of 34 mm and thicknesses of 1 mm were specially ground-based VLBI stations (Kono et al., submitted). The manufactured by Gantan Beauty Industry Co., Ltd and rescheduled single element flight will be a technical fea- assembled. To satisfy the 10 G static loading condition sibility demonstration of balloon–ground baselines at ∼ imposed on gondola systems launched at TARF, we used 20 GHz. A future goal will be to establish balloon–ground SUS304, which neither exhibits low temperature brittle- baselines at higher frequencies or balloon–balloon base- ness nor affects the geomagnetic sensor. We validated lines via simultaneous balloon flights, providing a strato- the structural design through structural analysis includ- spheric VLBI imaging array free from atmospheric effects. ing a buckling phenomenon, resulting in a unit meeting Next, we discuss the advantages and future prospects of the 2,600 mm (width) × 1,400 mm (depth) × 840 mm balloon-borne VLBI. The system configuration character- (height) dimensional requirement and the 100 kg mass re- istics relevant to the current experiment are those of the quirement. devices mounted on-board, namely, the frequency stan- The gondola width was designed not to hinder the aper- dard clock and the data recorder. On the other hand, the ture of the radio telescope with its wire cables from four VSOP satellite had no frequency standard clock or a data corner foot points (Figure 1(a)). The four wire cables are recorder. Link systems provided reference signal on uplink connected to the flight train via PIVOT, which blocks the and data transfer on downlink. This system configuration was complicated and costly. As a result, the observation http://www.shin-kowa.co.jp 27 R GORE VENT; https://www.gore.com/products/categories/venting 30 TM 28 Grasshopper graphical algorithm editor with integrated 3D http://www.ts.org/techno truss.html modeling tools. https://www.gantan.co.jp/ 10 Figure 5: Simulations of uv-coverages assuming seven-day flights around Antarctica and observation toward the Galactic center. The observing frequency is 350 GHz. (a) Four ground-based stations. (b) Four ground-based stations and one balloon-borne station. (c) Four ground-based stations and one additional Antarctic ground-based station. was limited within the range of operating time of ground- lizes the rotation of the Earth to generate baseline vector based tracking stations. Less severe environmental condi- variation, only a series of the identical trajectories can be tions for scientific balloon payloads make it easier to mount obtained everyday. However, adding a moving balloon- onboard these critical components for VLBI, which brings borne station increases the daily variation of trajectories about the advantage of simplifying the system configura- for uv-coverage in the following manner: tion for a VLBI station. The ability to recover the record- N(N − 1) M(M − 1) ing media is another advantage of balloon-borne missions + + NM × D, (1) 2 2 over conventional space missions. Given the progress that has been made in increasing recording media densities, a where M is the number of moving stations and D is the recording rate of 10–100 Gbps could potentially be ap- number of days. Figure 5 shows the results of a uv-coverage plied to enhance the sensitivity of each VLBI element (e.g., simulation for a seven-day observation. Due to the at- Alef et al. 2011; Oyama et al. 2016; Kim et al. 2018). mospheric phase fluctuations, there may not be so many However, such a high data rate transmission on a radio ground stations that can practically make VLBI observa- link is unrealistic (for comparison, the VSOP and Ra- tions at the 350-GHz band (e.g., the James Clerk Maxwell dioAstron satellites achieve rates of 0.128 Gbps). Thus, Telescope (JCMT) or Submillimeter Array at Mauna Kea, to achieve next generation space VLBI, further innova- the South Pole Telescope (SPT), the Large Millimetre Tele- tions such as optical communication are required. Such scope (LMT), and the phased-up ALMA at Atacama). sensitivity improvement is crucial to balloon-borne/space The uv-coverage made by these four ground-based tele- VLBI because the physical diameter of an on-board ra- scopes is shown in Figure 5 (a). We here consider a long- dio telescope within the payload must be limited to a duration balloon flight over Antarctica, which would typi- few meters or less at submillimeter/THz regimes. In the cally take two weeks to circumnavigate the South Pole once case of a 2-m diameter for a balloon-borne VLBI tele- (e.g., Seo et al., 2008). Figure 5 (b) shows the improve- scope (SEFD = 130, 000 Jy, an aperture efficiency of ments obtained by adding one Antarctic-orbiting balloon- 63%, T = 100 K), the 7-sigma fringe detection sensi- borne station, while Figure 5 (c) shows the improvements sys tivities at 350 GHz between the balloon–ground baselines obtained by adding one ground-based station to the Antarc- are expected to be ∼ 400 mJy and 50 mJy toward the tica region. Compared to the six baselines achievable with 12-m ALMA telescope (SEFD = 6000 Jy) and phased-up four stations in case (a), in case (b), the number of base- ALMA (SEFD = 100 Jy; Matthews et al. 2018), respec- lines is increased by 28 (to a total of 34), corresponding to tively. We assume here a data recording rate of 64 Gbps an array of approximately nine ground-based stations. By (e.g., Kim et al. 2018) and the integration of 10 sec. contrast, in case (c) the number of baselines has increased Another advantage of balloon-borne stations is their by only four (to a total of 10). Thus, adding a circum- mobility. One factor that influences image quality is the polar balloon station can lead to a significant increase in distribution and density of the sampling space, which is the number of daily baselines. This benefit peculiar to the called “uv-coverage”. The uv-coverage represents the as- use of moving stations has been produced by platforms sembly of trajectories of baseline vectors seen from an such as the VSOP and the RadioAstron satellites. Image observed celestial target. The number of trajectories is quality plays an important role in imaging astrophysical expected to be N(N − 1)/2, where N is the number of phenomena with complex shapes, such as black hole shad- ground-based stations. Because ground-based VLBI uti- ows. A significant increase in the number of baselines could 11 Figure 6: Simulations of uv-coverages of 24 h space VLBI observation toward the Galactic center. The observing Frequency is 230 GHz. (a) Eight ground-based stations without space VLBI. (b) One space VLBI station on a low-Earth orbit (altitude 500 km) and eight ground- based stations. be a decisive factor in the evolution of black hole science number of baselines by observation days. This benefit through high-fidelity/quality imaging. cannot be obtained with conventional arrays that solely Based on the effectiveness of the balloon-borne VLBI, comprise ground-based stations. it can be expected to develop into a satellite-based VLBI as a future mission (Palumbo et al., 2018). Figure 6 shows Acknowledgments uv-coverage simulations for a space VLBI at 230 GHz over 24 h generated using the Astronomical Radio Interferom- Our deep appreciation goes to Kanaguchi, M., Miyaji, Y., eter Simulator (ARIS; Asaki et al., 2007). Although a dif- Komori, A., Kobayashi, H., Ogi, Y., Takefuji, K., Tsuboi, M., ferent configuration of ground telescopes (potential eight and Manabe, T., Aoki, T., for their invaluable supports stations; e.g., Asada et al. 2017) is used in this simulation, to this project. A special note of thanks to all the staff important improvements are achieved through the use of involved in the development and operation of the Taiki a low-Earth orbit for the satellite, which at an altitude of Aerospace Research Field (TARF), a facility of the Japan 500 km would take only 94 min to orbit the Earth. As Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA); especially, we re- this equates to 15 orbits of the Earth over 24 h, which is ceived generous support from Yoshida, T. Saito, Y., Koy- equivalent to D = 15 in Equation 1, the number of base- anagi, K., and Sasaki, A. Scientific Ballooning Research lines increases significantly for even one observational day and Operation Group and the laboratory of infrared astro- theoretically. physics offer development infrastructures in the Sagami- hara campus of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), which is a branch of JAXA. We are also 6. Conclusion grateful to the staff and students involved in the develop- The balloon-borne VLBI station has been developed for ment and operation of the Mizusawa VLBI Observatory of performing radio interferometry in the stratosphere, where the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), the radio telescope is free from atmospheric effects. The which is a branch of the National Institutes of Natural Sci- first launch from TARF was canceled owing to changes in ences (NINS). The Mizusawa VLBI Observatory is respon- the wind condition at ground level. The rescheduled single sible for the operations of the correlator for the balloon- element flight will be a technical feasibility demonstration borne VLBI experiment. A large part of the large pressur- of the balloon-borne VLBI by establishing balloon–ground ized vessel (PVL) has also been developed at the Mizusawa baselines at ∼ 20 GHz as the first step. VLBI Observatory: we appreciate the contributions of This paper described the system design and develop- Matsueda, C., Asakura, Y., Matsukawa, Y., Nagayama, T., ment of a series of observing instruments and bus systems. Nakamura, H., Nishikawa, T., and Yamada, R. The en- The characteristics of system configuration are that two couragement from the Japan VLBI Consortium committee critical devices for a VLBI station, namely, the frequency were invaluable for continuing the development activities standard clock and the data recorder, are mounted on- of this experiment. Part of this activity is carried out un- board. This configuration maximizes the recording band- der the collaborative research agreement between RIKEN width and observation time without being limited by the and JAXA. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI, uplink/downlink of the ground tracking station. Further- Grant Numbers 26120537, 17H02874(AD), 16K05305 (YK), more, the mobility of the balloon-borne VLBI station can the Casio Science Promotion Foundation (AD), the In- improve the spatial sampling coverage by increasing the amori Foundation (YK), and the Sasakawa Scientific Re- 12 search Grant (SN). This study was partially supported by M., Scott, D., Semisch, C., Truch, M., Tucker, C., Tucker, G., Turner, A. D., Weibe, D., Oct. 2004. The Balloon-borne Large JAXA’s competitive grants for Strategic Basic Research Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST). In: Bradford, C. M., and Development (HT) and Expense for Basic Develop- Ade, P. A. R., Aguirre, J. E., Bock, J. J., Dragovan, M., Duband, ment of On-board Instruments and Experiment (YK). L., Earle, L., Glenn, J., Matsuhara, H., Naylor, B. J., Nguyen, H. T., Yun, M., Zmuidzinas, J. (Eds.), Z-Spec: a broadband millimeter-wave grating spectrometer: design, construction, and first cryogenic measurements. Vol. 5498 of Proc. 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Published: Dec 11, 2018

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