Universal Growth Scheme for Quantum Dots with Low Fine-Structure Splitting at Various Emission Wavelengths

Universal Growth Scheme for Quantum Dots with Low Fine-Structure Splitting at Various Emission... Efficient sources of individual pairs of entangled photons are required for quantum networks to operate using fiber-optic infrastructure. Entangled light can be generated by quantum dots (QDs) with naturally small fine-structure splitting (FSS) between exciton eigenstates. Moreover, QDs can be engineered to emit at standard telecom wavelengths. To achieve sufficient signal intensity for applications, QDs have been incorporated into one-dimensional optical microcavities. However, combining these properties in a single device has so far proved elusive. Here, we introduce a growth strategy to realize QDs with small FSS in the conventional telecom band, and within an optical cavity. Our approach employs ‘‘droplet-epitaxy’’ of InAs quantum dots on (001) substrates. We show the scheme improves the symmetry of the dots by 72%. Furthermore, our technique is universal, and produces low FSS QDs by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs emitting at ∼900  nm, and metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy on InP emitting at ∼1550  nm, with mean FSS 4× smaller than for Stranski-Krastanow QDs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review Applied American Physical Society (APS)

Universal Growth Scheme for Quantum Dots with Low Fine-Structure Splitting at Various Emission Wavelengths

Abstract

Efficient sources of individual pairs of entangled photons are required for quantum networks to operate using fiber-optic infrastructure. Entangled light can be generated by quantum dots (QDs) with naturally small fine-structure splitting (FSS) between exciton eigenstates. Moreover, QDs can be engineered to emit at standard telecom wavelengths. To achieve sufficient signal intensity for applications, QDs have been incorporated into one-dimensional optical microcavities. However, combining these properties in a single device has so far proved elusive. Here, we introduce a growth strategy to realize QDs with small FSS in the conventional telecom band, and within an optical cavity. Our approach employs ‘‘droplet-epitaxy’’ of InAs quantum dots on (001) substrates. We show the scheme improves the symmetry of the dots by 72%. Furthermore, our technique is universal, and produces low FSS QDs by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs emitting at ∼900  nm, and metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy on InP emitting at ∼1550  nm, with mean FSS 4× smaller than for Stranski-Krastanow QDs.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © © 2017 American Physical Society
eISSN
2331-7019
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevApplied.8.014013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Efficient sources of individual pairs of entangled photons are required for quantum networks to operate using fiber-optic infrastructure. Entangled light can be generated by quantum dots (QDs) with naturally small fine-structure splitting (FSS) between exciton eigenstates. Moreover, QDs can be engineered to emit at standard telecom wavelengths. To achieve sufficient signal intensity for applications, QDs have been incorporated into one-dimensional optical microcavities. However, combining these properties in a single device has so far proved elusive. Here, we introduce a growth strategy to realize QDs with small FSS in the conventional telecom band, and within an optical cavity. Our approach employs ‘‘droplet-epitaxy’’ of InAs quantum dots on (001) substrates. We show the scheme improves the symmetry of the dots by 72%. Furthermore, our technique is universal, and produces low FSS QDs by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs emitting at ∼900  nm, and metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy on InP emitting at ∼1550  nm, with mean FSS 4× smaller than for Stranski-Krastanow QDs.

Journal

Physical Review AppliedAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 1, 2017

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