Ultrafast x-ray diffraction thermometry measures the influence of spin excitations on the heat transport through nanolayers

Ultrafast x-ray diffraction thermometry measures the influence of spin excitations on the heat... We investigate the heat transport through a rare earth multilayer system composed of yttrium (Y), dysprosium (Dy), and niobium (Nb) by ultrafast x-ray diffraction. This is an example of a complex heat flow problem on the nanoscale, where several different quasiparticles carry the heat and conserve a nonequilibrium for more than 10 ns. The Bragg peak positions of each layer represent layer-specific thermometers that measure the energy flow through the sample after excitation of the Y top layer with fs-laser pulses. In an experiment-based analytic solution to the nonequilibrium heat transport problem, we derive the individual contributions of the spins and the coupled electron-lattice system to the heat conduction. The full characterization of the spatiotemporal energy flow at different starting temperatures reveals that the spin excitations of antiferromagnetic Dy speed up the heat transport into the Dy layer at low temperatures, whereas the heat transport through this layer and further into the Y and Nb layers underneath is slowed down. The experimental findings are compared to the solution of the heat equation using macroscopic temperature-dependent material parameters without separation of spin and phonon contributions to the heat. We explain why the simulated energy density matches our experiment-based derivation of the heat transport, although the simulated thermoelastic strain in this simulation is not even in qualitative agreement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review B American Physical Society (APS)

Ultrafast x-ray diffraction thermometry measures the influence of spin excitations on the heat transport through nanolayers

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Ultrafast x-ray diffraction thermometry measures the influence of spin excitations on the heat transport through nanolayers

Abstract

We investigate the heat transport through a rare earth multilayer system composed of yttrium (Y), dysprosium (Dy), and niobium (Nb) by ultrafast x-ray diffraction. This is an example of a complex heat flow problem on the nanoscale, where several different quasiparticles carry the heat and conserve a nonequilibrium for more than 10 ns. The Bragg peak positions of each layer represent layer-specific thermometers that measure the energy flow through the sample after excitation of the Y top layer with fs-laser pulses. In an experiment-based analytic solution to the nonequilibrium heat transport problem, we derive the individual contributions of the spins and the coupled electron-lattice system to the heat conduction. The full characterization of the spatiotemporal energy flow at different starting temperatures reveals that the spin excitations of antiferromagnetic Dy speed up the heat transport into the Dy layer at low temperatures, whereas the heat transport through this layer and further into the Y and Nb layers underneath is slowed down. The experimental findings are compared to the solution of the heat equation using macroscopic temperature-dependent material parameters without separation of spin and phonon contributions to the heat. We explain why the simulated energy density matches our experiment-based derivation of the heat transport, although the simulated thermoelastic strain in this simulation is not even in qualitative agreement.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1098-0121
eISSN
1550-235X
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevB.96.014306
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We investigate the heat transport through a rare earth multilayer system composed of yttrium (Y), dysprosium (Dy), and niobium (Nb) by ultrafast x-ray diffraction. This is an example of a complex heat flow problem on the nanoscale, where several different quasiparticles carry the heat and conserve a nonequilibrium for more than 10 ns. The Bragg peak positions of each layer represent layer-specific thermometers that measure the energy flow through the sample after excitation of the Y top layer with fs-laser pulses. In an experiment-based analytic solution to the nonequilibrium heat transport problem, we derive the individual contributions of the spins and the coupled electron-lattice system to the heat conduction. The full characterization of the spatiotemporal energy flow at different starting temperatures reveals that the spin excitations of antiferromagnetic Dy speed up the heat transport into the Dy layer at low temperatures, whereas the heat transport through this layer and further into the Y and Nb layers underneath is slowed down. The experimental findings are compared to the solution of the heat equation using macroscopic temperature-dependent material parameters without separation of spin and phonon contributions to the heat. We explain why the simulated energy density matches our experiment-based derivation of the heat transport, although the simulated thermoelastic strain in this simulation is not even in qualitative agreement.

Journal

Physical Review BAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 25, 2017

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