Tunability of room-temperature ferromagnetism in spintronic semiconductors through nonmagnetic atoms

Tunability of room-temperature ferromagnetism in spintronic semiconductors through nonmagnetic atoms The implementation and control of room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) by adding magnetic atoms to a semiconductor's lattice has been one of the most important problems in solid-state physics in the last decade. Herein we report on the mechanism that allows RTFM to be tuned by the inclusion of nonmagnetic aluminum in nickel ferrite. This material, NiFe2−xAlxO4 (x=0,0.5,1.5), has already shown much promise for magnetic semiconductor technologies, and we are able to add to its versatility technological viability with our results. The site occupancies and valencies of Fe atoms (Fe3+Td, Fe2+Oh, and Fe3+Oh) can be methodically controlled by including aluminum. Using the fact that aluminum strongly prefers a 3+ octahedral environment, we can selectively fill iron sites with aluminum atoms, and hence specifically tune the magnetic contributions for each of the iron sites, and therefore the bulk material as well. Interestingly, the influence of the aluminum is weak on the electronic structure, allowing one to retain the desirable electronic properties while achieving desirable magnetic properties. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review B American Physical Society (APS)

Tunability of room-temperature ferromagnetism in spintronic semiconductors through nonmagnetic atoms

Preview Only

Tunability of room-temperature ferromagnetism in spintronic semiconductors through nonmagnetic atoms

Abstract

The implementation and control of room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) by adding magnetic atoms to a semiconductor's lattice has been one of the most important problems in solid-state physics in the last decade. Herein we report on the mechanism that allows RTFM to be tuned by the inclusion of nonmagnetic aluminum in nickel ferrite. This material, NiFe2−xAlxO4 (x=0,0.5,1.5), has already shown much promise for magnetic semiconductor technologies, and we are able to add to its versatility technological viability with our results. The site occupancies and valencies of Fe atoms (Fe3+Td, Fe2+Oh, and Fe3+Oh) can be methodically controlled by including aluminum. Using the fact that aluminum strongly prefers a 3+ octahedral environment, we can selectively fill iron sites with aluminum atoms, and hence specifically tune the magnetic contributions for each of the iron sites, and therefore the bulk material as well. Interestingly, the influence of the aluminum is weak on the electronic structure, allowing one to retain the desirable electronic properties while achieving desirable magnetic properties.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/aps_physical/tunability-of-room-temperature-ferromagnetism-in-spintronic-okr56ECfi7
Publisher
American Physical Society (APS)
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1098-0121
eISSN
1550-235X
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevB.96.045202
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The implementation and control of room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) by adding magnetic atoms to a semiconductor's lattice has been one of the most important problems in solid-state physics in the last decade. Herein we report on the mechanism that allows RTFM to be tuned by the inclusion of nonmagnetic aluminum in nickel ferrite. This material, NiFe2−xAlxO4 (x=0,0.5,1.5), has already shown much promise for magnetic semiconductor technologies, and we are able to add to its versatility technological viability with our results. The site occupancies and valencies of Fe atoms (Fe3+Td, Fe2+Oh, and Fe3+Oh) can be methodically controlled by including aluminum. Using the fact that aluminum strongly prefers a 3+ octahedral environment, we can selectively fill iron sites with aluminum atoms, and hence specifically tune the magnetic contributions for each of the iron sites, and therefore the bulk material as well. Interestingly, the influence of the aluminum is weak on the electronic structure, allowing one to retain the desirable electronic properties while achieving desirable magnetic properties.

Journal

Physical Review BAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 10, 2017

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off