Terrestrial effects on dark matter-electron scattering experiments

Terrestrial effects on dark matter-electron scattering experiments A well-studied possibility is that dark matter may reside in a sector secluded from the Standard Model, except for the so-called photon portal: kinetic mixing between the ordinary and dark photons. Such interactions can be probed in dark matter direct detection experiments, and new experimental techniques involving detection of dark matter–electron scattering offer new sensitivity to sub-GeV dark matter. Typically however it is implicitly assumed that the dark matter is not altered as it traverses the Earth to arrive at the detector. In this paper we study in detail the effects of terrestrial stopping on dark photon models of dark matter, and find that they significantly reduce the sensitivity of XENON10 and DAMIC. In particular we find that XENON10 only excludes masses in the range (5–3000) MeV while DAMIC only probes (20–50) MeV. Their corresponding cross section sensitivity is reduced to a window of cross sections between (5×10-38–10-30)  cm2 for XENON10 and a small window around ∼10-31  cm2 for DAMIC. We also examine implications for a future DAMIC run. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review D American Physical Society (APS)

Terrestrial effects on dark matter-electron scattering experiments

Preview Only

Terrestrial effects on dark matter-electron scattering experiments

Abstract

A well-studied possibility is that dark matter may reside in a sector secluded from the Standard Model, except for the so-called photon portal: kinetic mixing between the ordinary and dark photons. Such interactions can be probed in dark matter direct detection experiments, and new experimental techniques involving detection of dark matter–electron scattering offer new sensitivity to sub-GeV dark matter. Typically however it is implicitly assumed that the dark matter is not altered as it traverses the Earth to arrive at the detector. In this paper we study in detail the effects of terrestrial stopping on dark photon models of dark matter, and find that they significantly reduce the sensitivity of XENON10 and DAMIC. In particular we find that XENON10 only excludes masses in the range (5–3000) MeV while DAMIC only probes (20–50) MeV. Their corresponding cross section sensitivity is reduced to a window of cross sections between (5×10-38–10-30)  cm2 for XENON10 and a small window around ∼10-31  cm2 for DAMIC. We also examine implications for a future DAMIC run.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/aps_physical/terrestrial-effects-on-dark-matter-electron-scattering-experiments-6DEOOgmYpv
Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © © 2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1550-7998
eISSN
1550-2368
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevD.96.015018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A well-studied possibility is that dark matter may reside in a sector secluded from the Standard Model, except for the so-called photon portal: kinetic mixing between the ordinary and dark photons. Such interactions can be probed in dark matter direct detection experiments, and new experimental techniques involving detection of dark matter–electron scattering offer new sensitivity to sub-GeV dark matter. Typically however it is implicitly assumed that the dark matter is not altered as it traverses the Earth to arrive at the detector. In this paper we study in detail the effects of terrestrial stopping on dark photon models of dark matter, and find that they significantly reduce the sensitivity of XENON10 and DAMIC. In particular we find that XENON10 only excludes masses in the range (5–3000) MeV while DAMIC only probes (20–50) MeV. Their corresponding cross section sensitivity is reduced to a window of cross sections between (5×10-38–10-30)  cm2 for XENON10 and a small window around ∼10-31  cm2 for DAMIC. We also examine implications for a future DAMIC run.

Journal

Physical Review DAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 1, 2017

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial