Si(111) strained layers on Ge(111): Evidence for c(2×4) domains

Si(111) strained layers on Ge(111): Evidence for c(2×4) domains The tensile-strained Si(111) layers grown on top of Ge(111) substrates are studied by combining scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and first-principles calculations. It is shown that the layers exhibit c(2×4) domains, which are separated by domain walls along 1¯10 directions. A model structure for the c(2×4) domains is proposed, which shows low formation energy and good agreement with the experimental data. The results of our calculations suggest that Ge atoms are likely to replace Si atoms with dangling bonds on the surface (rest-atoms and adatoms), thus significantly lowering the surface energy and inducing the formation of domain walls. The experiments and calculations demonstrate that when surface strain changes from compressive to tensile, the (111) reconstruction converts from dimer-adatom-stacking fault-based to adatom-based structures. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review B American Physical Society (APS)

Si(111) strained layers on Ge(111): Evidence for c(2×4) domains

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Si(111) strained layers on Ge(111): Evidence for c(2×4) domains

Abstract

The tensile-strained Si(111) layers grown on top of Ge(111) substrates are studied by combining scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and first-principles calculations. It is shown that the layers exhibit c(2×4) domains, which are separated by domain walls along 1¯10 directions. A model structure for the c(2×4) domains is proposed, which shows low formation energy and good agreement with the experimental data. The results of our calculations suggest that Ge atoms are likely to replace Si atoms with dangling bonds on the surface (rest-atoms and adatoms), thus significantly lowering the surface energy and inducing the formation of domain walls. The experiments and calculations demonstrate that when surface strain changes from compressive to tensile, the (111) reconstruction converts from dimer-adatom-stacking fault-based to adatom-based structures.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1098-0121
eISSN
1550-235X
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevB.96.085401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The tensile-strained Si(111) layers grown on top of Ge(111) substrates are studied by combining scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and first-principles calculations. It is shown that the layers exhibit c(2×4) domains, which are separated by domain walls along 1¯10 directions. A model structure for the c(2×4) domains is proposed, which shows low formation energy and good agreement with the experimental data. The results of our calculations suggest that Ge atoms are likely to replace Si atoms with dangling bonds on the surface (rest-atoms and adatoms), thus significantly lowering the surface energy and inducing the formation of domain walls. The experiments and calculations demonstrate that when surface strain changes from compressive to tensile, the (111) reconstruction converts from dimer-adatom-stacking fault-based to adatom-based structures.

Journal

Physical Review BAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Aug 1, 2017

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