Self-consistent numerical modeling of radiatively damped Lorentz oscillators

Self-consistent numerical modeling of radiatively damped Lorentz oscillators Recent progress towards realizing quantum emitters (QEs) suitable for integration in quantum information networks stimulates the demand for a self-consistent numerical approach to describe scattering of radiatively limited QEs in complex dielectric environments. As the QE response has to be characterized without the use of phenomenological damping parameters, the divergent nature of the pointlike emitter's in-phase self-field has to be carefully dealt with to avoid unphysical frequency shifts. Here we provide a solution to this problem and show two ways to obtain accurate results in the weak excitation limit using finite-difference time-domain algorithms. One of these approaches lays important groundwork needed for future simulations of nonlinear QE networks. The solution for dealing with the frequency shift reveals that dynamical contributions to the resonant depolarization field of arbitrarily small dielectric objects make crucial contributions to the net dipole moment induced by an external field when radiative scattering is the only source of damping. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review A American Physical Society (APS)

Self-consistent numerical modeling of radiatively damped Lorentz oscillators

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Self-consistent numerical modeling of radiatively damped Lorentz oscillators

Abstract

Recent progress towards realizing quantum emitters (QEs) suitable for integration in quantum information networks stimulates the demand for a self-consistent numerical approach to describe scattering of radiatively limited QEs in complex dielectric environments. As the QE response has to be characterized without the use of phenomenological damping parameters, the divergent nature of the pointlike emitter's in-phase self-field has to be carefully dealt with to avoid unphysical frequency shifts. Here we provide a solution to this problem and show two ways to obtain accurate results in the weak excitation limit using finite-difference time-domain algorithms. One of these approaches lays important groundwork needed for future simulations of nonlinear QE networks. The solution for dealing with the frequency shift reveals that dynamical contributions to the resonant depolarization field of arbitrarily small dielectric objects make crucial contributions to the net dipole moment induced by an external field when radiative scattering is the only source of damping.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1050-2947
eISSN
1094-1622
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevA.95.063853
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent progress towards realizing quantum emitters (QEs) suitable for integration in quantum information networks stimulates the demand for a self-consistent numerical approach to describe scattering of radiatively limited QEs in complex dielectric environments. As the QE response has to be characterized without the use of phenomenological damping parameters, the divergent nature of the pointlike emitter's in-phase self-field has to be carefully dealt with to avoid unphysical frequency shifts. Here we provide a solution to this problem and show two ways to obtain accurate results in the weak excitation limit using finite-difference time-domain algorithms. One of these approaches lays important groundwork needed for future simulations of nonlinear QE networks. The solution for dealing with the frequency shift reveals that dynamical contributions to the resonant depolarization field of arbitrarily small dielectric objects make crucial contributions to the net dipole moment induced by an external field when radiative scattering is the only source of damping.

Journal

Physical Review AAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jun 30, 2017

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