Redirection and Splitting of Sound Waves by a Periodic Chain of Thin Perforated Cylindrical Shells

Redirection and Splitting of Sound Waves by a Periodic Chain of Thin Perforated Cylindrical Shells The scattering of sound by finite and infinite chains of equally spaced perforated metallic cylindrical shells in an ideal (inviscid) and viscous fluid is theoretically studied using rigorous analytical and numerical approaches. Because of perforations, a chain of thin shells is practically transparent for sound within a wide range of frequencies. It is shown that strong scattering and redirection of sound by 90° may occur only for a discrete set of frequencies (Wood’s anomalies) where the leaky eigenmodes are excited. The spectrum of eigenmodes consists of antisymmetric and symmetric branches with normal and anomalous dispersion, respectively. The antisymmetric eigenmode turns out to be a deaf mode, since it cannot be excited at normal incidence. However, at slightly oblique incidence, both modes can be resonantly excited at different but close frequencies. The symmetric mode, due to its anomalous dispersion, scatters sound in the “wrong” direction. This property may find an application for the splitting of the two resonant harmonics of the incoming signal into two beams propagating along the chain in the opposite directions. A chain of perforated cylinders may also be used as a passive antenna that detects the direction to the incoming signal by measuring the frequencies of the waves excited in the chain. Calculations are presented for aluminum shells in viscous air where the effects of anomalous scattering, redirection, and signal splitting are well manifested. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review Applied American Physical Society (APS)

Redirection and Splitting of Sound Waves by a Periodic Chain of Thin Perforated Cylindrical Shells

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Redirection and Splitting of Sound Waves by a Periodic Chain of Thin Perforated Cylindrical Shells

Abstract

The scattering of sound by finite and infinite chains of equally spaced perforated metallic cylindrical shells in an ideal (inviscid) and viscous fluid is theoretically studied using rigorous analytical and numerical approaches. Because of perforations, a chain of thin shells is practically transparent for sound within a wide range of frequencies. It is shown that strong scattering and redirection of sound by 90° may occur only for a discrete set of frequencies (Wood’s anomalies) where the leaky eigenmodes are excited. The spectrum of eigenmodes consists of antisymmetric and symmetric branches with normal and anomalous dispersion, respectively. The antisymmetric eigenmode turns out to be a deaf mode, since it cannot be excited at normal incidence. However, at slightly oblique incidence, both modes can be resonantly excited at different but close frequencies. The symmetric mode, due to its anomalous dispersion, scatters sound in the “wrong” direction. This property may find an application for the splitting of the two resonant harmonics of the incoming signal into two beams propagating along the chain in the opposite directions. A chain of perforated cylinders may also be used as a passive antenna that detects the direction to the incoming signal by measuring the frequencies of the waves excited in the chain. Calculations are presented for aluminum shells in viscous air where the effects of anomalous scattering, redirection, and signal splitting are well manifested.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © © 2017 American Physical Society
eISSN
2331-7019
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevApplied.7.064034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The scattering of sound by finite and infinite chains of equally spaced perforated metallic cylindrical shells in an ideal (inviscid) and viscous fluid is theoretically studied using rigorous analytical and numerical approaches. Because of perforations, a chain of thin shells is practically transparent for sound within a wide range of frequencies. It is shown that strong scattering and redirection of sound by 90° may occur only for a discrete set of frequencies (Wood’s anomalies) where the leaky eigenmodes are excited. The spectrum of eigenmodes consists of antisymmetric and symmetric branches with normal and anomalous dispersion, respectively. The antisymmetric eigenmode turns out to be a deaf mode, since it cannot be excited at normal incidence. However, at slightly oblique incidence, both modes can be resonantly excited at different but close frequencies. The symmetric mode, due to its anomalous dispersion, scatters sound in the “wrong” direction. This property may find an application for the splitting of the two resonant harmonics of the incoming signal into two beams propagating along the chain in the opposite directions. A chain of perforated cylinders may also be used as a passive antenna that detects the direction to the incoming signal by measuring the frequencies of the waves excited in the chain. Calculations are presented for aluminum shells in viscous air where the effects of anomalous scattering, redirection, and signal splitting are well manifested.

Journal

Physical Review AppliedAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jun 1, 2017

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