Quadrupole stellar oscillations: The impact of gravitational waves from the Galactic Center

Quadrupole stellar oscillations: The impact of gravitational waves from the Galactic Center Acoustic quadrupole modes of sunlike stars vibrate when perturbed by a passing gravitational wave generated somewhere in the Universe. Here, we compute the imprint of the gravitational waves on the acoustic spectrum of these stars for gravitational events occurring near the supermassive black hole located at the center of the Milky Way. We found that in most cases the impact of gravitational waves in low-order quadrupole modes is not above the current observational threshold of detectability, although this should be in the reach of the next generation of near infrared observatories and asteroseismology satellite missions. Equally, we found that it is possible to follow the end phase of the coalescence of binaries with large chirp masses, as these phenomena have a unique imprint in the spectra of sunlike stars affecting sequentially several low-order quadrupole modes. Moreover, we discuss the different imprints on the acoustic spectra of the different types of binary systems constituted either by two white dwarfs, two neutron stars, two black holes or a compact star and a massive black hole. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review D American Physical Society (APS)

Quadrupole stellar oscillations: The impact of gravitational waves from the Galactic Center

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Quadrupole stellar oscillations: The impact of gravitational waves from the Galactic Center

Abstract

Acoustic quadrupole modes of sunlike stars vibrate when perturbed by a passing gravitational wave generated somewhere in the Universe. Here, we compute the imprint of the gravitational waves on the acoustic spectrum of these stars for gravitational events occurring near the supermassive black hole located at the center of the Milky Way. We found that in most cases the impact of gravitational waves in low-order quadrupole modes is not above the current observational threshold of detectability, although this should be in the reach of the next generation of near infrared observatories and asteroseismology satellite missions. Equally, we found that it is possible to follow the end phase of the coalescence of binaries with large chirp masses, as these phenomena have a unique imprint in the spectra of sunlike stars affecting sequentially several low-order quadrupole modes. Moreover, we discuss the different imprints on the acoustic spectra of the different types of binary systems constituted either by two white dwarfs, two neutron stars, two black holes or a compact star and a massive black hole.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © © 2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1550-7998
eISSN
1550-2368
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevD.95.123015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acoustic quadrupole modes of sunlike stars vibrate when perturbed by a passing gravitational wave generated somewhere in the Universe. Here, we compute the imprint of the gravitational waves on the acoustic spectrum of these stars for gravitational events occurring near the supermassive black hole located at the center of the Milky Way. We found that in most cases the impact of gravitational waves in low-order quadrupole modes is not above the current observational threshold of detectability, although this should be in the reach of the next generation of near infrared observatories and asteroseismology satellite missions. Equally, we found that it is possible to follow the end phase of the coalescence of binaries with large chirp masses, as these phenomena have a unique imprint in the spectra of sunlike stars affecting sequentially several low-order quadrupole modes. Moreover, we discuss the different imprints on the acoustic spectra of the different types of binary systems constituted either by two white dwarfs, two neutron stars, two black holes or a compact star and a massive black hole.

Journal

Physical Review DAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jun 15, 2017

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