Periodic jetting and monodisperse jet drops from oblique gas injection

Periodic jetting and monodisperse jet drops from oblique gas injection When air is blown in a straw or tube near an air-liquid interface, typically one of two behaviors is observed: a dimple in the liquid's surface, or a frenzy of sputtering bubbles, waves, and spray. Here we report and characterize an intermediate regime that can develop when a confined air jet enters the interface at an angle. This regime is oscillatory with a distinct characteristic frequency and can develop periodic angled jets that can break up into monodisperse aerosols. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this highly periodic regime are not well understood. Here we flow a continuous stream of gas through a tube near a liquid surface, observing both optically and acoustically the deformation of the liquid-air interface as various parameters are systematically adjusted. We show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is responsible for the inception of waves within a cavity formed by the gas. Inertia, gravity, and capillary forces both shape the cavity and govern the frequency and amplitude of these gas-induced cavity waves. The flapping cavity focuses the waves into a series of periodic jets that can break up into droplets following the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. We present scaling arguments to rationalize the fundamental frequencies driving this system, as well as the conditions that bound the periodic regime. These frequencies and conditions compare well with our experimental results. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review E American Physical Society (APS)

Periodic jetting and monodisperse jet drops from oblique gas injection

Preview Only

Periodic jetting and monodisperse jet drops from oblique gas injection

Abstract

When air is blown in a straw or tube near an air-liquid interface, typically one of two behaviors is observed: a dimple in the liquid's surface, or a frenzy of sputtering bubbles, waves, and spray. Here we report and characterize an intermediate regime that can develop when a confined air jet enters the interface at an angle. This regime is oscillatory with a distinct characteristic frequency and can develop periodic angled jets that can break up into monodisperse aerosols. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this highly periodic regime are not well understood. Here we flow a continuous stream of gas through a tube near a liquid surface, observing both optically and acoustically the deformation of the liquid-air interface as various parameters are systematically adjusted. We show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is responsible for the inception of waves within a cavity formed by the gas. Inertia, gravity, and capillary forces both shape the cavity and govern the frequency and amplitude of these gas-induced cavity waves. The flapping cavity focuses the waves into a series of periodic jets that can break up into droplets following the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. We present scaling arguments to rationalize the fundamental frequencies driving this system, as well as the conditions that bound the periodic regime. These frequencies and conditions compare well with our experimental results.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/aps_physical/periodic-jetting-and-monodisperse-jet-drops-from-oblique-gas-injection-i9V3BnCyPo
Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1539-3755
eISSN
550-2376
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevE.96.013112
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

When air is blown in a straw or tube near an air-liquid interface, typically one of two behaviors is observed: a dimple in the liquid's surface, or a frenzy of sputtering bubbles, waves, and spray. Here we report and characterize an intermediate regime that can develop when a confined air jet enters the interface at an angle. This regime is oscillatory with a distinct characteristic frequency and can develop periodic angled jets that can break up into monodisperse aerosols. The underlying mechanisms responsible for this highly periodic regime are not well understood. Here we flow a continuous stream of gas through a tube near a liquid surface, observing both optically and acoustically the deformation of the liquid-air interface as various parameters are systematically adjusted. We show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is responsible for the inception of waves within a cavity formed by the gas. Inertia, gravity, and capillary forces both shape the cavity and govern the frequency and amplitude of these gas-induced cavity waves. The flapping cavity focuses the waves into a series of periodic jets that can break up into droplets following the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. We present scaling arguments to rationalize the fundamental frequencies driving this system, as well as the conditions that bound the periodic regime. These frequencies and conditions compare well with our experimental results.

Journal

Physical Review EAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 19, 2017

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off