Oscillation of Branching Ratios Between the D(2s)+D(1s) and the D(2p)+D(1s) Channels in Direct Photodissociation of D2

Oscillation of Branching Ratios Between the D(2s)+D(1s) and the D(2p)+D(1s) Channels in Direct... The direct photodissociation of D2 at excitation energies above 14.76 eV occurs via two channels, D(2s)+D(1s) and D(2p)+D(1s). The branching ratios between the two have been measured from the dissociation threshold to 3200 cm−1 above it, and it is found that they show cosine oscillations as a function of the fragment wave vector magnitudes. The oscillation is due to an interference effect and can be simulated using the phase difference between the wave functions of the two channels, analogous to Young’s double-slit experiment. By fitting the measured branching ratios, we have determined the depths and widths of the effective spherical potential wells related to the two channels, which are in agreement with the effective depths and widths of the ab initio interaction potentials. The results of this Letter illustrate the importance of the relative phase between the fragments in controlling the branching ratios of the photodissociation channels. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review Letters American Physical Society (APS)

Oscillation of Branching Ratios Between the D(2s)+D(1s) and the D(2p)+D(1s) Channels in Direct Photodissociation of D2

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Oscillation of Branching Ratios Between the D(2s)+D(1s) and the D(2p)+D(1s) Channels in Direct Photodissociation of D2

Abstract

The direct photodissociation of D2 at excitation energies above 14.76 eV occurs via two channels, D(2s)+D(1s) and D(2p)+D(1s). The branching ratios between the two have been measured from the dissociation threshold to 3200 cm−1 above it, and it is found that they show cosine oscillations as a function of the fragment wave vector magnitudes. The oscillation is due to an interference effect and can be simulated using the phase difference between the wave functions of the two channels, analogous to Young’s double-slit experiment. By fitting the measured branching ratios, we have determined the depths and widths of the effective spherical potential wells related to the two channels, which are in agreement with the effective depths and widths of the ab initio interaction potentials. The results of this Letter illustrate the importance of the relative phase between the fragments in controlling the branching ratios of the photodissociation channels.
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Publisher
American Physical Society (APS)
Copyright
Copyright © © 2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
0031-9007
eISSN
1079-7114
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.053002
Publisher site
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Abstract

The direct photodissociation of D2 at excitation energies above 14.76 eV occurs via two channels, D(2s)+D(1s) and D(2p)+D(1s). The branching ratios between the two have been measured from the dissociation threshold to 3200 cm−1 above it, and it is found that they show cosine oscillations as a function of the fragment wave vector magnitudes. The oscillation is due to an interference effect and can be simulated using the phase difference between the wave functions of the two channels, analogous to Young’s double-slit experiment. By fitting the measured branching ratios, we have determined the depths and widths of the effective spherical potential wells related to the two channels, which are in agreement with the effective depths and widths of the ab initio interaction potentials. The results of this Letter illustrate the importance of the relative phase between the fragments in controlling the branching ratios of the photodissociation channels.

Journal

Physical Review LettersAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Aug 4, 2017

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