Near-field limitations of Fresnel-regime coherent diffraction imaging

Near-field limitations of Fresnel-regime coherent diffraction imaging Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a rapidly developing form of imaging that offers the potential of wavelength-limited resolution without image-forming lenses. In CDI, the intensity of the diffraction pattern is measured directly by the detector, and various iterative phase retrieval algorithms are used to “invert” the diffraction pattern and reconstruct a high-resolution image of the sample. However, there are certain requirements in CDI that must be met to reconstruct the object. Although most experiments are conducted in the “far-field”—or Fraunhofer—regime where the requirements are not as stringent, some experiments must be conducted in the “near field” where Fresnel diffraction must be considered. According to the derivation of Fresnel diffraction, successful reconstructions can only be obtained when the small-angle number, a derived quantity, is much less than one. We show, however, that it is not actually necessary to fulfill the small-angle condition. The Fresnel kernel well approximates the exact kernel in regions where the phase oscillates slowly, and in regions of fast oscillations, indicated by large An, the error between kernels should be negligible due to stationary-phase arguments. We experimentally verify this conclusion with a helium neon laser setup and show that it should hold at x-ray wavelengths as well. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review B American Physical Society (APS)

Near-field limitations of Fresnel-regime coherent diffraction imaging

Preview Only

Near-field limitations of Fresnel-regime coherent diffraction imaging

Abstract

Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a rapidly developing form of imaging that offers the potential of wavelength-limited resolution without image-forming lenses. In CDI, the intensity of the diffraction pattern is measured directly by the detector, and various iterative phase retrieval algorithms are used to “invert” the diffraction pattern and reconstruct a high-resolution image of the sample. However, there are certain requirements in CDI that must be met to reconstruct the object. Although most experiments are conducted in the “far-field”—or Fraunhofer—regime where the requirements are not as stringent, some experiments must be conducted in the “near field” where Fresnel diffraction must be considered. According to the derivation of Fresnel diffraction, successful reconstructions can only be obtained when the small-angle number, a derived quantity, is much less than one. We show, however, that it is not actually necessary to fulfill the small-angle condition. The Fresnel kernel well approximates the exact kernel in regions where the phase oscillates slowly, and in regions of fast oscillations, indicated by large An, the error between kernels should be negligible due to stationary-phase arguments. We experimentally verify this conclusion with a helium neon laser setup and show that it should hold at x-ray wavelengths as well.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/aps_physical/near-field-limitations-of-fresnel-regime-coherent-diffraction-imaging-A1UEX2zmBB
Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1098-0121
eISSN
1550-235X
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevB.96.054104
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a rapidly developing form of imaging that offers the potential of wavelength-limited resolution without image-forming lenses. In CDI, the intensity of the diffraction pattern is measured directly by the detector, and various iterative phase retrieval algorithms are used to “invert” the diffraction pattern and reconstruct a high-resolution image of the sample. However, there are certain requirements in CDI that must be met to reconstruct the object. Although most experiments are conducted in the “far-field”—or Fraunhofer—regime where the requirements are not as stringent, some experiments must be conducted in the “near field” where Fresnel diffraction must be considered. According to the derivation of Fresnel diffraction, successful reconstructions can only be obtained when the small-angle number, a derived quantity, is much less than one. We show, however, that it is not actually necessary to fulfill the small-angle condition. The Fresnel kernel well approximates the exact kernel in regions where the phase oscillates slowly, and in regions of fast oscillations, indicated by large An, the error between kernels should be negligible due to stationary-phase arguments. We experimentally verify this conclusion with a helium neon laser setup and show that it should hold at x-ray wavelengths as well.

Journal

Physical Review BAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Aug 4, 2017

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial