Near-field deformation of a liquid interface by atomic force microscopy

Near-field deformation of a liquid interface by atomic force microscopy We experiment the interaction between a liquid puddle and a spherical probe by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for a probe radius R ranging from 10 nm to 30 μm. We have developed a new experimental setup by coupling an AFM with a high-speed camera and an inverted optical microscope. Interaction force-distance curves (in contact mode) and frequency shift–distance curves (in frequency modulation mode) are measured for different bulk model liquids for which the probe-liquid Hamaker constant Hpl is known. The experimental results, analyzed in the frame of the theoretical model developed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 106104 (2012)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.106104 and Phys. Rev. E 85, 061602 (2012)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.061602, allow to determine the “jump-to-contact” critical distance dmin below which the liquid jumps and wets the probe. Comparison between theory and experiments shows that the probe-liquid interaction at nanoscale is controlled by the liquid interface deformation. This work shows a very good agreement between the theoretical model and the experiments and paves the way to experimental studies of liquids at the nanoscale. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review E American Physical Society (APS)

Near-field deformation of a liquid interface by atomic force microscopy

Preview Only

Near-field deformation of a liquid interface by atomic force microscopy

Abstract

We experiment the interaction between a liquid puddle and a spherical probe by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for a probe radius R ranging from 10 nm to 30 μm. We have developed a new experimental setup by coupling an AFM with a high-speed camera and an inverted optical microscope. Interaction force-distance curves (in contact mode) and frequency shift–distance curves (in frequency modulation mode) are measured for different bulk model liquids for which the probe-liquid Hamaker constant Hpl is known. The experimental results, analyzed in the frame of the theoretical model developed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 106104 (2012)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.106104 and Phys. Rev. E 85, 061602 (2012)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.061602, allow to determine the “jump-to-contact” critical distance dmin below which the liquid jumps and wets the probe. Comparison between theory and experiments shows that the probe-liquid interaction at nanoscale is controlled by the liquid interface deformation. This work shows a very good agreement between the theoretical model and the experiments and paves the way to experimental studies of liquids at the nanoscale.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/aps_physical/near-field-deformation-of-a-liquid-interface-by-atomic-force-JbvghLKD2O
Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1539-3755
eISSN
550-2376
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevE.96.012802
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We experiment the interaction between a liquid puddle and a spherical probe by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) for a probe radius R ranging from 10 nm to 30 μm. We have developed a new experimental setup by coupling an AFM with a high-speed camera and an inverted optical microscope. Interaction force-distance curves (in contact mode) and frequency shift–distance curves (in frequency modulation mode) are measured for different bulk model liquids for which the probe-liquid Hamaker constant Hpl is known. The experimental results, analyzed in the frame of the theoretical model developed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 106104 (2012)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.106104 and Phys. Rev. E 85, 061602 (2012)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.061602, allow to determine the “jump-to-contact” critical distance dmin below which the liquid jumps and wets the probe. Comparison between theory and experiments shows that the probe-liquid interaction at nanoscale is controlled by the liquid interface deformation. This work shows a very good agreement between the theoretical model and the experiments and paves the way to experimental studies of liquids at the nanoscale.

Journal

Physical Review EAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 5, 2017

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial