Microscopic Origin of Ideal Conductivity in Integrable Quantum Models

Microscopic Origin of Ideal Conductivity in Integrable Quantum Models Nonergodic dynamical systems display anomalous transport properties. Prominent examples are integrable quantum systems, whose exceptional properties are diverging dc conductivities. In this Letter, we explain the microscopic origin of ideal conductivity by resorting to the thermodynamic particle content of a system. Using group-theoretic arguments we rigorously resolve the long-standing controversy regarding the nature of spin and charge Drude weights in the absence of chemical potentials. In addition, by employing a hydrodynamic description, we devise an efficient computational method to calculate exact Drude weights from the stationary currents generated in an inhomogeneous quench from bipartitioned initial states. We exemplify the method on the anisotropic Heisenberg model at finite temperatures for the entire range of anisotropies, accessing regimes that are out of reach with other approaches. Quite remarkably, spin Drude weight and asymptotic spin current rates reveal a completely discontinuous (fractal) dependence on the anisotropy parameter. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review Letters American Physical Society (APS)

Microscopic Origin of Ideal Conductivity in Integrable Quantum Models

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Microscopic Origin of Ideal Conductivity in Integrable Quantum Models

Abstract

Nonergodic dynamical systems display anomalous transport properties. Prominent examples are integrable quantum systems, whose exceptional properties are diverging dc conductivities. In this Letter, we explain the microscopic origin of ideal conductivity by resorting to the thermodynamic particle content of a system. Using group-theoretic arguments we rigorously resolve the long-standing controversy regarding the nature of spin and charge Drude weights in the absence of chemical potentials. In addition, by employing a hydrodynamic description, we devise an efficient computational method to calculate exact Drude weights from the stationary currents generated in an inhomogeneous quench from bipartitioned initial states. We exemplify the method on the anisotropic Heisenberg model at finite temperatures for the entire range of anisotropies, accessing regimes that are out of reach with other approaches. Quite remarkably, spin Drude weight and asymptotic spin current rates reveal a completely discontinuous (fractal) dependence on the anisotropy parameter.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © © 2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
0031-9007
eISSN
1079-7114
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.020602
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nonergodic dynamical systems display anomalous transport properties. Prominent examples are integrable quantum systems, whose exceptional properties are diverging dc conductivities. In this Letter, we explain the microscopic origin of ideal conductivity by resorting to the thermodynamic particle content of a system. Using group-theoretic arguments we rigorously resolve the long-standing controversy regarding the nature of spin and charge Drude weights in the absence of chemical potentials. In addition, by employing a hydrodynamic description, we devise an efficient computational method to calculate exact Drude weights from the stationary currents generated in an inhomogeneous quench from bipartitioned initial states. We exemplify the method on the anisotropic Heisenberg model at finite temperatures for the entire range of anisotropies, accessing regimes that are out of reach with other approaches. Quite remarkably, spin Drude weight and asymptotic spin current rates reveal a completely discontinuous (fractal) dependence on the anisotropy parameter.

Journal

Physical Review LettersAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 14, 2017

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