Interaction-induced interlayer charge transfer in the extreme quantum limit

Interaction-induced interlayer charge transfer in the extreme quantum limit An interacting bilayer electron system provides an extended platform to study electron-electron interaction beyond single layers. We report here experiments demonstrating that the layer densities of an asymmetric bilayer electron system oscillate as a function of perpendicular magnetic field that quantizes the energy levels. At intermediate fields, this interlayer charge transfer can be well explained by the alignment of the Landau levels in the two layers. At the highest fields where both layers reach the extreme quantum limit, however, there is an anomalous, enhanced charge transfer to the majority layer. Surprisingly, when the minority layer becomes extremely dilute, this charge transfer slows down as the electrons in the minority layer condense into a Wigner crystal. Furthermore, by examining the quantum capacitance of the dilute layer at high fields, the screening induced by the composite fermions in an adjacent layer is unveiled. The results highlight the influence of strong interaction in interlayer charge transfer in the regime of very high fields and low Landau level filling factors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review B American Physical Society (APS)

Interaction-induced interlayer charge transfer in the extreme quantum limit

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Interaction-induced interlayer charge transfer in the extreme quantum limit

Abstract

An interacting bilayer electron system provides an extended platform to study electron-electron interaction beyond single layers. We report here experiments demonstrating that the layer densities of an asymmetric bilayer electron system oscillate as a function of perpendicular magnetic field that quantizes the energy levels. At intermediate fields, this interlayer charge transfer can be well explained by the alignment of the Landau levels in the two layers. At the highest fields where both layers reach the extreme quantum limit, however, there is an anomalous, enhanced charge transfer to the majority layer. Surprisingly, when the minority layer becomes extremely dilute, this charge transfer slows down as the electrons in the minority layer condense into a Wigner crystal. Furthermore, by examining the quantum capacitance of the dilute layer at high fields, the screening induced by the composite fermions in an adjacent layer is unveiled. The results highlight the influence of strong interaction in interlayer charge transfer in the regime of very high fields and low Landau level filling factors.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1098-0121
eISSN
1550-235X
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevB.96.081102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An interacting bilayer electron system provides an extended platform to study electron-electron interaction beyond single layers. We report here experiments demonstrating that the layer densities of an asymmetric bilayer electron system oscillate as a function of perpendicular magnetic field that quantizes the energy levels. At intermediate fields, this interlayer charge transfer can be well explained by the alignment of the Landau levels in the two layers. At the highest fields where both layers reach the extreme quantum limit, however, there is an anomalous, enhanced charge transfer to the majority layer. Surprisingly, when the minority layer becomes extremely dilute, this charge transfer slows down as the electrons in the minority layer condense into a Wigner crystal. Furthermore, by examining the quantum capacitance of the dilute layer at high fields, the screening induced by the composite fermions in an adjacent layer is unveiled. The results highlight the influence of strong interaction in interlayer charge transfer in the regime of very high fields and low Landau level filling factors.

Journal

Physical Review BAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Aug 8, 2017

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