Impact of Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer measurements of β decay of fission products on the decay heat and reactor ν¯e flux calculation

Impact of Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer measurements of β decay of fission products on... We report the results of a β-decay study of fission products Br86, Kr89, Rb89, Rb90gs, Rb90m, Kr90, Rb92, Xe139, and Cs142 performed with the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) and on-line mass-separated ion beams. These radioactivities were assessed by the Nuclear Energy Agency as having high priority for decay heat analysis during a nuclear fuel cycle. We observe a substantial increase in β feeding to high excited states in all daughter isotopes in comparison to earlier data. This increases the average γ-ray energy emitted by the decay of fission fragments during the first 10 000 s after fission of U235 and Pu239 by approximately 2% and 1%, respectively, improving agreement between results of calculations and direct observations. New MTAS results reduce the reference reactor ν¯e flux used to analyze reactor ν¯e interaction with detector matter. The reduction determined by the ab initio method for the four nuclear fuel components, U235, U238, Pu239, and Pu241, amounts to 0.976, 0.986, 0.983, and 0.984, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review Letters American Physical Society (APS)
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Impact of Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer measurements of β decay of fission products on the decay heat and reactor ν¯e flux calculation

Abstract

We report the results of a β-decay study of fission products Br86, Kr89, Rb89, Rb90gs, Rb90m, Kr90, Rb92, Xe139, and Cs142 performed with the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) and on-line mass-separated ion beams. These radioactivities were assessed by the Nuclear Energy Agency as having high priority for decay heat analysis during a nuclear fuel cycle. We observe a substantial increase in β feeding to high excited states in all daughter isotopes in comparison to earlier data. This increases the average γ-ray energy emitted by the decay of fission fragments during the first 10 000 s after fission of U235 and Pu239 by approximately 2% and 1%, respectively, improving agreement between results of calculations and direct observations. New MTAS results reduce the reference reactor ν¯e flux used to analyze reactor ν¯e interaction with detector matter. The reduction determined by the ab initio method for the four nuclear fuel components, U235, U238, Pu239, and Pu241, amounts to 0.976, 0.986, 0.983, and 0.984, respectively.
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Publisher
American Physical Society (APS)
Copyright
Copyright © © 2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
0031-9007
eISSN
1079-7114
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.052503
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We report the results of a β-decay study of fission products Br86, Kr89, Rb89, Rb90gs, Rb90m, Kr90, Rb92, Xe139, and Cs142 performed with the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) and on-line mass-separated ion beams. These radioactivities were assessed by the Nuclear Energy Agency as having high priority for decay heat analysis during a nuclear fuel cycle. We observe a substantial increase in β feeding to high excited states in all daughter isotopes in comparison to earlier data. This increases the average γ-ray energy emitted by the decay of fission fragments during the first 10 000 s after fission of U235 and Pu239 by approximately 2% and 1%, respectively, improving agreement between results of calculations and direct observations. New MTAS results reduce the reference reactor ν¯e flux used to analyze reactor ν¯e interaction with detector matter. The reduction determined by the ab initio method for the four nuclear fuel components, U235, U238, Pu239, and Pu241, amounts to 0.976, 0.986, 0.983, and 0.984, respectively.

Journal

Physical Review LettersAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Aug 4, 2017

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