Impact of g-factors and valleys on spin qubits in a silicon double quantum dot

Impact of g-factors and valleys on spin qubits in a silicon double quantum dot We define single electron spin qubits in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot system. By mapping the qubit resonance frequency as a function of a gate-induced electric field, the spectrum reveals an anticrossing that is consistent with an intervalley spin-orbit coupling. We fit the data from which we extract an intervalley coupling strength of 43 MHz. In addition, we observe a narrow resonance near the primary qubit resonance when we operate the device in the (1,1) charge configuration. The experimental data are consistent with a simulation involving two weakly exchanged-coupled spins with a Zeeman energy difference of 1 MHz, of the same order as the Rabi frequency. We conclude that the narrow resonance is the result of driven transitions between the T− and T+ triplet states, using an electron spin resonance signal of frequency located halfway between the resonance frequencies of the two individual spins. The findings presented here offer an alternative method of implementing two-qubit gates, of relevance to the operation of larger-scale spin qubit systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review B American Physical Society (APS)

Impact of g-factors and valleys on spin qubits in a silicon double quantum dot

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Impact of g-factors and valleys on spin qubits in a silicon double quantum dot

Abstract

We define single electron spin qubits in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot system. By mapping the qubit resonance frequency as a function of a gate-induced electric field, the spectrum reveals an anticrossing that is consistent with an intervalley spin-orbit coupling. We fit the data from which we extract an intervalley coupling strength of 43 MHz. In addition, we observe a narrow resonance near the primary qubit resonance when we operate the device in the (1,1) charge configuration. The experimental data are consistent with a simulation involving two weakly exchanged-coupled spins with a Zeeman energy difference of 1 MHz, of the same order as the Rabi frequency. We conclude that the narrow resonance is the result of driven transitions between the T− and T+ triplet states, using an electron spin resonance signal of frequency located halfway between the resonance frequencies of the two individual spins. The findings presented here offer an alternative method of implementing two-qubit gates, of relevance to the operation of larger-scale spin qubit systems.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1098-0121
eISSN
1550-235X
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevB.96.045302
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We define single electron spin qubits in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot system. By mapping the qubit resonance frequency as a function of a gate-induced electric field, the spectrum reveals an anticrossing that is consistent with an intervalley spin-orbit coupling. We fit the data from which we extract an intervalley coupling strength of 43 MHz. In addition, we observe a narrow resonance near the primary qubit resonance when we operate the device in the (1,1) charge configuration. The experimental data are consistent with a simulation involving two weakly exchanged-coupled spins with a Zeeman energy difference of 1 MHz, of the same order as the Rabi frequency. We conclude that the narrow resonance is the result of driven transitions between the T− and T+ triplet states, using an electron spin resonance signal of frequency located halfway between the resonance frequencies of the two individual spins. The findings presented here offer an alternative method of implementing two-qubit gates, of relevance to the operation of larger-scale spin qubit systems.

Journal

Physical Review BAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 5, 2017

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