How fast does a random walk cover a torus?

How fast does a random walk cover a torus? We present high statistics simulation data for the average time ⟨Tcover(L)⟩ that a random walk needs to cover completely a two-dimensional torus of size L×L. They confirm the mathematical prediction that ⟨Tcover(L)⟩∼(LlnL)2 for large L, but the prefactor seems to deviate significantly from the supposedly exact result 4/π derived by Dembo et al. [Ann. Math. 160, 433 (2004)ANMAAH0003-486X10.4007/annals.2004.160.433], if the most straightforward extrapolation is used. On the other hand, we find that this scaling does hold for the time TN(t)=1(L) at which the average number of yet unvisited sites is 1, as also predicted previously. This might suggest (wrongly) that ⟨Tcover(L)⟩ and TN(t)=1(L) scale differently, although the distribution of rescaled cover times becomes sharp in the limit L→∞. But our results can be reconciled with those of Dembo et al. by a very slow and nonmonotonic convergence of ⟨Tcover(L)⟩/(LlnL)2, as had been indeed proven by Belius et al. [Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 167, 461 (2017)10.1007/s00440-015-0689-6] for Brownian walks, and was conjectured by them to hold also for lattice walks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review E American Physical Society (APS)

How fast does a random walk cover a torus?

Preview Only

How fast does a random walk cover a torus?

Abstract

We present high statistics simulation data for the average time ⟨Tcover(L)⟩ that a random walk needs to cover completely a two-dimensional torus of size L×L. They confirm the mathematical prediction that ⟨Tcover(L)⟩∼(LlnL)2 for large L, but the prefactor seems to deviate significantly from the supposedly exact result 4/π derived by Dembo et al. [Ann. Math. 160, 433 (2004)ANMAAH0003-486X10.4007/annals.2004.160.433], if the most straightforward extrapolation is used. On the other hand, we find that this scaling does hold for the time TN(t)=1(L) at which the average number of yet unvisited sites is 1, as also predicted previously. This might suggest (wrongly) that ⟨Tcover(L)⟩ and TN(t)=1(L) scale differently, although the distribution of rescaled cover times becomes sharp in the limit L→∞. But our results can be reconciled with those of Dembo et al. by a very slow and nonmonotonic convergence of ⟨Tcover(L)⟩/(LlnL)2, as had been indeed proven by Belius et al. [Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 167, 461 (2017)10.1007/s00440-015-0689-6] for Brownian walks, and was conjectured by them to hold also for lattice walks.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/aps_physical/how-fast-does-a-random-walk-cover-a-torus-qqlnIbrTgQ
Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1539-3755
eISSN
550-2376
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevE.96.012115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We present high statistics simulation data for the average time ⟨Tcover(L)⟩ that a random walk needs to cover completely a two-dimensional torus of size L×L. They confirm the mathematical prediction that ⟨Tcover(L)⟩∼(LlnL)2 for large L, but the prefactor seems to deviate significantly from the supposedly exact result 4/π derived by Dembo et al. [Ann. Math. 160, 433 (2004)ANMAAH0003-486X10.4007/annals.2004.160.433], if the most straightforward extrapolation is used. On the other hand, we find that this scaling does hold for the time TN(t)=1(L) at which the average number of yet unvisited sites is 1, as also predicted previously. This might suggest (wrongly) that ⟨Tcover(L)⟩ and TN(t)=1(L) scale differently, although the distribution of rescaled cover times becomes sharp in the limit L→∞. But our results can be reconciled with those of Dembo et al. by a very slow and nonmonotonic convergence of ⟨Tcover(L)⟩/(LlnL)2, as had been indeed proven by Belius et al. [Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 167, 461 (2017)10.1007/s00440-015-0689-6] for Brownian walks, and was conjectured by them to hold also for lattice walks.

Journal

Physical Review EAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 10, 2017

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off