Fresnel coefficients and Fabry-Perot formula for spatially dispersive metallic layers

Fresnel coefficients and Fabry-Perot formula for spatially dispersive metallic layers The repulsion between free electrons inside a metal makes its optical response spatially dispersive, so that it is not described by Drude's model but by a hydrodynamic model. We give here fully analytic results for a metallic slab in this framework, thanks to a two-mode cavity formalism leading to a Fabry-Perot formula, and show that a simplification can be made that preserves the accuracy of the results while allowing much simpler analytic expressions. For metallic layers thicker than 2.7 nm modified Fresnel coefficients can actually be used to accurately predict the response of any multilayer with spatially dispersive metals (for reflection, transmission, or the guided modes). Finally, this explains why adding a small dielectric layer [Y. Luo , Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 093901 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.111.093901] allows one to reproduce the effects of nonlocality in many cases, and especially for multilayers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review B American Physical Society (APS)

Fresnel coefficients and Fabry-Perot formula for spatially dispersive metallic layers

Preview Only

Fresnel coefficients and Fabry-Perot formula for spatially dispersive metallic layers

Abstract

The repulsion between free electrons inside a metal makes its optical response spatially dispersive, so that it is not described by Drude's model but by a hydrodynamic model. We give here fully analytic results for a metallic slab in this framework, thanks to a two-mode cavity formalism leading to a Fabry-Perot formula, and show that a simplification can be made that preserves the accuracy of the results while allowing much simpler analytic expressions. For metallic layers thicker than 2.7 nm modified Fresnel coefficients can actually be used to accurately predict the response of any multilayer with spatially dispersive metals (for reflection, transmission, or the guided modes). Finally, this explains why adding a small dielectric layer [Y. Luo , Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 093901 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.111.093901] allows one to reproduce the effects of nonlocality in many cases, and especially for multilayers.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/aps_physical/fresnel-coefficients-and-fabry-perot-formula-for-spatially-dispersive-A0TL0UUO26
Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1098-0121
eISSN
1550-235X
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevB.96.041406
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The repulsion between free electrons inside a metal makes its optical response spatially dispersive, so that it is not described by Drude's model but by a hydrodynamic model. We give here fully analytic results for a metallic slab in this framework, thanks to a two-mode cavity formalism leading to a Fabry-Perot formula, and show that a simplification can be made that preserves the accuracy of the results while allowing much simpler analytic expressions. For metallic layers thicker than 2.7 nm modified Fresnel coefficients can actually be used to accurately predict the response of any multilayer with spatially dispersive metals (for reflection, transmission, or the guided modes). Finally, this explains why adding a small dielectric layer [Y. Luo , Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 093901 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.111.093901] allows one to reproduce the effects of nonlocality in many cases, and especially for multilayers.

Journal

Physical Review BAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 17, 2017

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off