Flux Noise in a Superconducting Transmission Line

Flux Noise in a Superconducting Transmission Line We study a superconducting transmission line (TL) formed by distributed LC oscillators and excited by external magnetic fluxes which are aroused from random magnetization (A) placed in substrate or (B) distributed at interfaces of a two-wire TL. The low-frequency dynamics of a random magnetic field is described based on the diffusion Langevin equation with a short-range source caused by (a) a random amplitude or (b) the gradient of magnetization. For a TL modeled as a two-port network with open and shorted ends, the effective magnetic flux at the open end has nonlocal dependency on noise distribution along the TL. The flux-flux correlation function is evaluated and analyzed for the regimes (Aa), (Ab), (Ba), and (Bb). Essential frequency dispersion takes place around the inverse diffusion time of random flux along the TL. Typically, noise effect increases with size faster than the area of the TL. The flux-flux correlator can be verified both via the population relaxation rate of the qubit, which is formed by the Josephson junction shunted by the TL with flux noises, and via random voltage at the open end of the TL. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review Applied American Physical Society (APS)

Flux Noise in a Superconducting Transmission Line

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Flux Noise in a Superconducting Transmission Line

Abstract

We study a superconducting transmission line (TL) formed by distributed LC oscillators and excited by external magnetic fluxes which are aroused from random magnetization (A) placed in substrate or (B) distributed at interfaces of a two-wire TL. The low-frequency dynamics of a random magnetic field is described based on the diffusion Langevin equation with a short-range source caused by (a) a random amplitude or (b) the gradient of magnetization. For a TL modeled as a two-port network with open and shorted ends, the effective magnetic flux at the open end has nonlocal dependency on noise distribution along the TL. The flux-flux correlation function is evaluated and analyzed for the regimes (Aa), (Ab), (Ba), and (Bb). Essential frequency dispersion takes place around the inverse diffusion time of random flux along the TL. Typically, noise effect increases with size faster than the area of the TL. The flux-flux correlator can be verified both via the population relaxation rate of the qubit, which is formed by the Josephson junction shunted by the TL with flux noises, and via random voltage at the open end of the TL.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © © 2017 American Physical Society
eISSN
2331-7019
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevApplied.8.024003
Publisher site
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Abstract

We study a superconducting transmission line (TL) formed by distributed LC oscillators and excited by external magnetic fluxes which are aroused from random magnetization (A) placed in substrate or (B) distributed at interfaces of a two-wire TL. The low-frequency dynamics of a random magnetic field is described based on the diffusion Langevin equation with a short-range source caused by (a) a random amplitude or (b) the gradient of magnetization. For a TL modeled as a two-port network with open and shorted ends, the effective magnetic flux at the open end has nonlocal dependency on noise distribution along the TL. The flux-flux correlation function is evaluated and analyzed for the regimes (Aa), (Ab), (Ba), and (Bb). Essential frequency dispersion takes place around the inverse diffusion time of random flux along the TL. Typically, noise effect increases with size faster than the area of the TL. The flux-flux correlator can be verified both via the population relaxation rate of the qubit, which is formed by the Josephson junction shunted by the TL with flux noises, and via random voltage at the open end of the TL.

Journal

Physical Review AppliedAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Aug 1, 2017

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