Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on silicon with an intense femtosecond laser pulse

Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on silicon with an intense femtosecond laser pulse We report the experimental observation of anomalies appearing in the reflection of intense p-polarized 100-femtosecond (fs) laser pulses at a nonmetallic material surface with a grating structure. The reflectivity was measured in air as a function of the angle of incidence at a Si grating. The results have exhibited an abrupt decrease to create a sharp dip at a specific incident angle of ∼24∘, where the grating surface was deeply ablated along the edge of the grooves. Similar to the so-called Wood's anomalies, the observed angle-dependent reflectivity provides direct evidence that surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can resonantly be excited at the interface between air and the nonmetallic material surface, as the intense fs laser pulse produces a high density of free electrons to form a metal-like layer on the Si grating surface. Calculation for a model target reproduces well the experimental results to confirm the excitation of SPPs on the Si grating, demonstrating the generation of enhanced near fields for the periodic ablation of a target surface. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review B American Physical Society (APS)

Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on silicon with an intense femtosecond laser pulse

Preview Only

Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons on silicon with an intense femtosecond laser pulse

Abstract

We report the experimental observation of anomalies appearing in the reflection of intense p-polarized 100-femtosecond (fs) laser pulses at a nonmetallic material surface with a grating structure. The reflectivity was measured in air as a function of the angle of incidence at a Si grating. The results have exhibited an abrupt decrease to create a sharp dip at a specific incident angle of ∼24∘, where the grating surface was deeply ablated along the edge of the grooves. Similar to the so-called Wood's anomalies, the observed angle-dependent reflectivity provides direct evidence that surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can resonantly be excited at the interface between air and the nonmetallic material surface, as the intense fs laser pulse produces a high density of free electrons to form a metal-like layer on the Si grating surface. Calculation for a model target reproduces well the experimental results to confirm the excitation of SPPs on the Si grating, demonstrating the generation of enhanced near fields for the periodic ablation of a target surface.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/aps_physical/excitation-of-surface-plasmon-polaritons-on-silicon-with-an-intense-G20xu41ynB
Publisher
American Physical Society (APS)
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1098-0121
eISSN
1550-235X
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevB.96.045122
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We report the experimental observation of anomalies appearing in the reflection of intense p-polarized 100-femtosecond (fs) laser pulses at a nonmetallic material surface with a grating structure. The reflectivity was measured in air as a function of the angle of incidence at a Si grating. The results have exhibited an abrupt decrease to create a sharp dip at a specific incident angle of ∼24∘, where the grating surface was deeply ablated along the edge of the grooves. Similar to the so-called Wood's anomalies, the observed angle-dependent reflectivity provides direct evidence that surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) can resonantly be excited at the interface between air and the nonmetallic material surface, as the intense fs laser pulse produces a high density of free electrons to form a metal-like layer on the Si grating surface. Calculation for a model target reproduces well the experimental results to confirm the excitation of SPPs on the Si grating, demonstrating the generation of enhanced near fields for the periodic ablation of a target surface.

Journal

Physical Review BAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 17, 2017

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off