Balancing specificity, sensitivity, and speed of ligand discrimination by zero-order ultraspecificity

Balancing specificity, sensitivity, and speed of ligand discrimination by zero-order... Specific interactions between receptors and their target ligands in the presence of nontarget ligands are crucial for biological processes such as T cell ligand discrimination. To discriminate between the target and nontarget ligands, cells have to increase specificity to the target ligands by amplifying the small differences in affinity among ligands. In addition, sensitivity to the ligand concentration and quick discrimination are also important to detect low amounts of target ligands and facilitate fast cellular decision making after ligand recognition. In this work we propose a mechanism for nonlinear specificity amplification (ultraspecificity) based on zero-order saturating reactions, which was originally proposed to explain nonlinear sensitivity amplification (ultrasensitivity) to the ligand concentration. In contrast to the previously proposed proofreading mechanisms that amplify the specificity by a multistep reaction, our model can produce an optimal balance of specificity, sensitivity, and quick discrimination. Furthermore, we show that a model for insensitivity to a large number of nontarget ligands can be naturally derived from a model with the zero-order ultraspecificity. The zero-order ultraspecificity, therefore, may provide an alternative way to understand ligand discrimination from the viewpoint of nonlinear properties in biochemical reactions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review E American Physical Society (APS)

Balancing specificity, sensitivity, and speed of ligand discrimination by zero-order ultraspecificity

Preview Only

Balancing specificity, sensitivity, and speed of ligand discrimination by zero-order ultraspecificity

Abstract

Specific interactions between receptors and their target ligands in the presence of nontarget ligands are crucial for biological processes such as T cell ligand discrimination. To discriminate between the target and nontarget ligands, cells have to increase specificity to the target ligands by amplifying the small differences in affinity among ligands. In addition, sensitivity to the ligand concentration and quick discrimination are also important to detect low amounts of target ligands and facilitate fast cellular decision making after ligand recognition. In this work we propose a mechanism for nonlinear specificity amplification (ultraspecificity) based on zero-order saturating reactions, which was originally proposed to explain nonlinear sensitivity amplification (ultrasensitivity) to the ligand concentration. In contrast to the previously proposed proofreading mechanisms that amplify the specificity by a multistep reaction, our model can produce an optimal balance of specificity, sensitivity, and quick discrimination. Furthermore, we show that a model for insensitivity to a large number of nontarget ligands can be naturally derived from a model with the zero-order ultraspecificity. The zero-order ultraspecificity, therefore, may provide an alternative way to understand ligand discrimination from the viewpoint of nonlinear properties in biochemical reactions.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/aps_physical/balancing-specificity-sensitivity-and-speed-of-ligand-discrimination-bbD0VZ0TJx
Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1539-3755
eISSN
550-2376
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevE.96.012405
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Specific interactions between receptors and their target ligands in the presence of nontarget ligands are crucial for biological processes such as T cell ligand discrimination. To discriminate between the target and nontarget ligands, cells have to increase specificity to the target ligands by amplifying the small differences in affinity among ligands. In addition, sensitivity to the ligand concentration and quick discrimination are also important to detect low amounts of target ligands and facilitate fast cellular decision making after ligand recognition. In this work we propose a mechanism for nonlinear specificity amplification (ultraspecificity) based on zero-order saturating reactions, which was originally proposed to explain nonlinear sensitivity amplification (ultrasensitivity) to the ligand concentration. In contrast to the previously proposed proofreading mechanisms that amplify the specificity by a multistep reaction, our model can produce an optimal balance of specificity, sensitivity, and quick discrimination. Furthermore, we show that a model for insensitivity to a large number of nontarget ligands can be naturally derived from a model with the zero-order ultraspecificity. The zero-order ultraspecificity, therefore, may provide an alternative way to understand ligand discrimination from the viewpoint of nonlinear properties in biochemical reactions.

Journal

Physical Review EAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 14, 2017

There are no references for this article.

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off