Anomalous diffusion and stress relaxation in surfactant micelles

Anomalous diffusion and stress relaxation in surfactant micelles We investigate the mechanisms of anomalous diffusion in cationic surfactant micelles using molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of explicit salt and solvent-mediated interactions. Simulations show that when the counterion density increases, saddle-shaped branched interfaces manifest. In experiments, branched structures exhibit lower viscosity as compared to linear and wormlike micelles. This has long been attributed to stress relaxation arising from the sliding motion of branches along the main chain. Our simulations reveal a mechanism of branch motion resulting from an enhanced counterion condensation at the branched interfaces and provide quantitative evidence of stress relaxation facilitated by branched sliding. Furthermore, depending on the surfactant and salt concentrations, which in turn determine the microstructure, we observe normal, subdiffusive, and superdiffusive motions of surfactants. Specifically, superdiffusive behavior is associated with branch sliding, breakage and recombination of micelle fragments, as well as constraint release in entangled systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physical Review E American Physical Society (APS)

Anomalous diffusion and stress relaxation in surfactant micelles

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Anomalous diffusion and stress relaxation in surfactant micelles

Abstract

We investigate the mechanisms of anomalous diffusion in cationic surfactant micelles using molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of explicit salt and solvent-mediated interactions. Simulations show that when the counterion density increases, saddle-shaped branched interfaces manifest. In experiments, branched structures exhibit lower viscosity as compared to linear and wormlike micelles. This has long been attributed to stress relaxation arising from the sliding motion of branches along the main chain. Our simulations reveal a mechanism of branch motion resulting from an enhanced counterion condensation at the branched interfaces and provide quantitative evidence of stress relaxation facilitated by branched sliding. Furthermore, depending on the surfactant and salt concentrations, which in turn determine the microstructure, we observe normal, subdiffusive, and superdiffusive motions of surfactants. Specifically, superdiffusive behavior is associated with branch sliding, breakage and recombination of micelle fragments, as well as constraint release in entangled systems.
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Publisher
The American Physical Society
Copyright
Copyright © ©2017 American Physical Society
ISSN
1539-3755
eISSN
550-2376
D.O.I.
10.1103/PhysRevE.96.012605
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We investigate the mechanisms of anomalous diffusion in cationic surfactant micelles using molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of explicit salt and solvent-mediated interactions. Simulations show that when the counterion density increases, saddle-shaped branched interfaces manifest. In experiments, branched structures exhibit lower viscosity as compared to linear and wormlike micelles. This has long been attributed to stress relaxation arising from the sliding motion of branches along the main chain. Our simulations reveal a mechanism of branch motion resulting from an enhanced counterion condensation at the branched interfaces and provide quantitative evidence of stress relaxation facilitated by branched sliding. Furthermore, depending on the surfactant and salt concentrations, which in turn determine the microstructure, we observe normal, subdiffusive, and superdiffusive motions of surfactants. Specifically, superdiffusive behavior is associated with branch sliding, breakage and recombination of micelle fragments, as well as constraint release in entangled systems.

Journal

Physical Review EAmerican Physical Society (APS)

Published: Jul 24, 2017

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