Thermosensory micromapping of warm and cold sensitivity across glabrous and hairy skin of male and female hands and feet

Thermosensory micromapping of warm and cold sensitivity across glabrous and hairy skin of male... The ability of hands and feet to convey skin thermal sensations is an important contributor to our experience of the surrounding world. Surprisingly, the detailed topographical distribution of warm and cold thermosensitivity across hands and feet has not been mapped, although sensitivity maps exist for touch and pain. Using a recently developed quantitative sensory test, we mapped warm and cold thermosensitivity of 103 skin sites over glabrous and hairy skin of hands and feet in male (30.2{plus minus}5.8y) and female (27.7{plus minus}5.1y) adults matched for body-surface-area (M 1.77{plus minus}0.2m2; F 1.64{plus minus}0.1m2; p=0.155).Findings indicated that warm and cold thermosensitivity varies by 5-fold across glabrous and hairy skin of hands and feet, and that hands (warm/cold sensitivity: 1.25/2.14 vote.{degree sign}C-1) are twice as sensitive as the feet (warm/cold sensitivity: 0.51/0.99 vote.{degree sign}C-1). Opposite to what known for touch and pain sensitivity, we observed a characteristic distal-to-proximal increase in thermosensitivity over both hairy and glabrous skin (i.e. from fingers/toes to body of hands and feet), and found that hairy skin is more sensitive than glabrous. Finally, we show that body-surface-area-matched males and females presented small differences in thermosensitivity, and that these differences are constrained to glabrous skin only. Our high-density thermosensory micromapping provides the most detailed thermosensitivity maps of hands and feet in young adults available to date. These maps offer a window into peripheral and central mechanisms of thermosensory integration in humans, and will help guiding future developments in smart skin and sensory neuroprostheses, in wearable energy-efficient personal comfort systems, and in sport and protective clothing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Thermosensory micromapping of warm and cold sensitivity across glabrous and hairy skin of male and female hands and feet

Journal of Applied Physiology Feb 14, 2018

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ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
D.O.I.
10.1152/japplphysiol.00158.2018
Publisher site
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Abstract

The ability of hands and feet to convey skin thermal sensations is an important contributor to our experience of the surrounding world. Surprisingly, the detailed topographical distribution of warm and cold thermosensitivity across hands and feet has not been mapped, although sensitivity maps exist for touch and pain. Using a recently developed quantitative sensory test, we mapped warm and cold thermosensitivity of 103 skin sites over glabrous and hairy skin of hands and feet in male (30.2{plus minus}5.8y) and female (27.7{plus minus}5.1y) adults matched for body-surface-area (M 1.77{plus minus}0.2m2; F 1.64{plus minus}0.1m2; p=0.155).Findings indicated that warm and cold thermosensitivity varies by 5-fold across glabrous and hairy skin of hands and feet, and that hands (warm/cold sensitivity: 1.25/2.14 vote.{degree sign}C-1) are twice as sensitive as the feet (warm/cold sensitivity: 0.51/0.99 vote.{degree sign}C-1). Opposite to what known for touch and pain sensitivity, we observed a characteristic distal-to-proximal increase in thermosensitivity over both hairy and glabrous skin (i.e. from fingers/toes to body of hands and feet), and found that hairy skin is more sensitive than glabrous. Finally, we show that body-surface-area-matched males and females presented small differences in thermosensitivity, and that these differences are constrained to glabrous skin only. Our high-density thermosensory micromapping provides the most detailed thermosensitivity maps of hands and feet in young adults available to date. These maps offer a window into peripheral and central mechanisms of thermosensory integration in humans, and will help guiding future developments in smart skin and sensory neuroprostheses, in wearable energy-efficient personal comfort systems, and in sport and protective clothing.

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Feb 14, 2018

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