The role of insulin at brain-liver axis in the control of glucose production

The role of insulin at brain-liver axis in the control of glucose production Glucose is an essential metabolic substrate for all mammalian cells and its availability in the circulation is carefully controlled to avoid wide variations. Different mechanisms are involved in the glucose disposal, such as an adequate pancreatic and hepatic function. Insulin is the main hormone in glycemic control, and its action occurs directly in the cells, as well as in the liver, as in an indirect way, to ultimately control the glycemia. Insulin has also an important action within the central nervous system, more precisely in the hypothalamus that project directly to pre-autonomic nuclei in the brainstem to control hepatic glucose production. The central action of insulin relies on autonomic outflow through the vagal innervation of the liver, where insulin is able to modulate the production of glucose at this organ level. In this way, responses generated in the CNS reach the effector organs by autonomic efferent pathways as part of an important brain-organ axis in the control of glycemia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology The American Physiological Society

The role of insulin at brain-liver axis in the control of glucose production

AJP - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology Sep 20, 2017

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ISSN
0193-1857
eISSN
1522-1547
D.O.I.
10.1152/ajpgi.00290.2017
Publisher site
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Abstract

Glucose is an essential metabolic substrate for all mammalian cells and its availability in the circulation is carefully controlled to avoid wide variations. Different mechanisms are involved in the glucose disposal, such as an adequate pancreatic and hepatic function. Insulin is the main hormone in glycemic control, and its action occurs directly in the cells, as well as in the liver, as in an indirect way, to ultimately control the glycemia. Insulin has also an important action within the central nervous system, more precisely in the hypothalamus that project directly to pre-autonomic nuclei in the brainstem to control hepatic glucose production. The central action of insulin relies on autonomic outflow through the vagal innervation of the liver, where insulin is able to modulate the production of glucose at this organ level. In this way, responses generated in the CNS reach the effector organs by autonomic efferent pathways as part of an important brain-organ axis in the control of glycemia.

Journal

AJP - Gastrointestinal and Liver PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Sep 20, 2017

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