The influence of vagal control on sex-related differences in left ventricular mechanics and hemodynamics

The influence of vagal control on sex-related differences in left ventricular mechanics and... Background. Left ventricular (LV) twist mechanics differ between males and females during acute physiological stress, which may be partly mediated by sex differences in autonomic control. While males appear to have greater adrenergic control of LV twist, the potential contribution of vagal modulation to sex differences in LV twist remains unknown. Therefore, this study examined the role of vagal control on sex differences in LV twist during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and supine cycling. Methods. On two separate visits, LV mechanics were assessed using 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in 18 males (22{plus minus}2yr) and 17 females (21{plus minus}4yr) during -40 and -60 mmHg LBNP and 25% and 50% of peak supine cycling workload, with and without glycopyrrolate (vagal blockade). Results. LV twist was not different at baseline but was greater in females during -60 mmHg in both control (F:16.0{plus minus}3.4º, M:12.9{plus minus}2.3º, p=0.004) and glycopyrrolate trials (F:17.7{plus minus}5.9{degree sign}, M:13.9{plus minus}3.3{degree sign}, p<0.001) due to greater apical rotation during control (F:11.9{plus minus}3.6º, M:7.8{plus minus}1.5º, p<0.001) and glycopyrrolate (F:11.6{plus minus}4.9{degree sign}, M:7.1{plus minus}3.6{degree sign}, p=0.009). These sex differences in LV twist consistently coincided with a greater LV sphericity index (i.e. ellipsoid geometry) in females compared to males. In contrast, LV twist did not differ between the sexes during exercise, with or without glycopyrrolate. Conclusions. Females have augmented LV twist compared to males during large reductions to preload, even during vagal blockade. As such, differences in vagal control do not appear to contribute to sex differences in the LV twist responses to physiological stress, but may be related to differences in ventricular geometry. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Heart and Circulatory Physiology The American Physiological Society

The influence of vagal control on sex-related differences in left ventricular mechanics and hemodynamics

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/lp/aps/the-influence-of-vagal-control-on-sex-related-differences-in-left-4BNqr86NbN
ISSN
0363-6135
eISSN
1522-1539
D.O.I.
10.1152/ajpheart.00733.2017
Publisher site
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Abstract

Background. Left ventricular (LV) twist mechanics differ between males and females during acute physiological stress, which may be partly mediated by sex differences in autonomic control. While males appear to have greater adrenergic control of LV twist, the potential contribution of vagal modulation to sex differences in LV twist remains unknown. Therefore, this study examined the role of vagal control on sex differences in LV twist during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and supine cycling. Methods. On two separate visits, LV mechanics were assessed using 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in 18 males (22{plus minus}2yr) and 17 females (21{plus minus}4yr) during -40 and -60 mmHg LBNP and 25% and 50% of peak supine cycling workload, with and without glycopyrrolate (vagal blockade). Results. LV twist was not different at baseline but was greater in females during -60 mmHg in both control (F:16.0{plus minus}3.4º, M:12.9{plus minus}2.3º, p=0.004) and glycopyrrolate trials (F:17.7{plus minus}5.9{degree sign}, M:13.9{plus minus}3.3{degree sign}, p<0.001) due to greater apical rotation during control (F:11.9{plus minus}3.6º, M:7.8{plus minus}1.5º, p<0.001) and glycopyrrolate (F:11.6{plus minus}4.9{degree sign}, M:7.1{plus minus}3.6{degree sign}, p=0.009). These sex differences in LV twist consistently coincided with a greater LV sphericity index (i.e. ellipsoid geometry) in females compared to males. In contrast, LV twist did not differ between the sexes during exercise, with or without glycopyrrolate. Conclusions. Females have augmented LV twist compared to males during large reductions to preload, even during vagal blockade. As such, differences in vagal control do not appear to contribute to sex differences in the LV twist responses to physiological stress, but may be related to differences in ventricular geometry.

Journal

AJP - Heart and Circulatory PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Dec 20, 2017

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