Predictive encoding of motor behavior in the supplementary motor area is disrupted in Parkinsonism

Predictive encoding of motor behavior in the supplementary motor area is disrupted in Parkinsonism Many studies suggest that Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with changes in neuronal activity patterns throughout the basal ganglia-thalamocortical motor circuit. There are limited electrophysiological data, however, describing how parkinsonism impacts the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and SMA proper (SMAp), cortical areas known to be involved in movement planning and motor control. In this study, local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded in the pre-SMA/SMAp of a non-human primate during a visually cued reaching task. Recordings were made in the same subject in both the naive and parkinsonian state using the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of parkinsonism. We found that in the naive animal, well before a go cue providing instruction of reach onset and direction was given, LFP activity was dynamically modulated in both high (20-30 Hz) and low-beta (10-20 Hz) bands, and the magnitude of this modulation correlated linearly with reaction time (RT) on a trial-to-trial basis, suggesting it may predictively encode for RT. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observed that this activity was more prominent within the pre-SMA compared to SMAp. In the parkinsonian state, however, pre-SMA/SMAp beta band modulation was disrupted, particularly in the high-beta band, such that the predictive encoding of RT was significantly diminished. In addition, the predictive encoding of RT preferentially within pre-SMA over SMAp was lost. These findings add to our understanding of the role of pre-SMA/SMAp in motor behavior and suggest a fundamental role of these cortical areas in early preparatory and pre-movement processes that are altered in parkinsonism. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurophysiology The American Physiological Society

Predictive encoding of motor behavior in the supplementary motor area is disrupted in Parkinsonism

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ISSN
0022-3077
eISSN
1522-1598
D.O.I.
10.1152/jn.00306.2018
Publisher site
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Abstract

Many studies suggest that Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with changes in neuronal activity patterns throughout the basal ganglia-thalamocortical motor circuit. There are limited electrophysiological data, however, describing how parkinsonism impacts the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and SMA proper (SMAp), cortical areas known to be involved in movement planning and motor control. In this study, local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded in the pre-SMA/SMAp of a non-human primate during a visually cued reaching task. Recordings were made in the same subject in both the naive and parkinsonian state using the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of parkinsonism. We found that in the naive animal, well before a go cue providing instruction of reach onset and direction was given, LFP activity was dynamically modulated in both high (20-30 Hz) and low-beta (10-20 Hz) bands, and the magnitude of this modulation correlated linearly with reaction time (RT) on a trial-to-trial basis, suggesting it may predictively encode for RT. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observed that this activity was more prominent within the pre-SMA compared to SMAp. In the parkinsonian state, however, pre-SMA/SMAp beta band modulation was disrupted, particularly in the high-beta band, such that the predictive encoding of RT was significantly diminished. In addition, the predictive encoding of RT preferentially within pre-SMA over SMAp was lost. These findings add to our understanding of the role of pre-SMA/SMAp in motor behavior and suggest a fundamental role of these cortical areas in early preparatory and pre-movement processes that are altered in parkinsonism.

Journal

Journal of NeurophysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: May 7, 2018

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