Differential Effects of Vitamin C or Protandim on Skeletal Muscle Adaptation to Exercise

Differential Effects of Vitamin C or Protandim on Skeletal Muscle Adaptation to Exercise Maintaining proteostasis is a key mechanism for preserving cell function. Exercise-stimulated proteostasis is regulated, in part, by redox-sensitive signaling. Several studies suggest that supplementation with exogenous antioxidants blunts exercise-induced cellular adaptations, though this conclusion lacks consensus. Our group uses a fundamentally different approach to maintain redox balance by treatment with bioactive phytochemicals to activate the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and downstream endogenous antioxidant pathways. We hypothesized that VitC would interfere with redox-sensitive proteostatic mechanisms in skeletal muscle while phytochemical treatment would permit proteostatic maintenance. We measured protein and DNA synthesis in skeletal muscle from high-volume voluntary wheel running rats. While phytochemical treatment permitted mitochondrial and other proteostatic adaptations to exercise, VitC treatment did not. During an in vitro oxidative challenge, phytochemical treatment helped maintain proteostasis, including the mitochondrial fraction, while VitC did not. Our findings support the conclusion that VitC can blunt some of the beneficial adaptations to exercise. We propose that regulation of endogenous antioxidants represents a novel approach to maintain redox balance while still permitting redox-sensitive proteostatic adaptations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Differential Effects of Vitamin C or Protandim on Skeletal Muscle Adaptation to Exercise

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ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
D.O.I.
10.1152/japplphysiol.00277.2018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Maintaining proteostasis is a key mechanism for preserving cell function. Exercise-stimulated proteostasis is regulated, in part, by redox-sensitive signaling. Several studies suggest that supplementation with exogenous antioxidants blunts exercise-induced cellular adaptations, though this conclusion lacks consensus. Our group uses a fundamentally different approach to maintain redox balance by treatment with bioactive phytochemicals to activate the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and downstream endogenous antioxidant pathways. We hypothesized that VitC would interfere with redox-sensitive proteostatic mechanisms in skeletal muscle while phytochemical treatment would permit proteostatic maintenance. We measured protein and DNA synthesis in skeletal muscle from high-volume voluntary wheel running rats. While phytochemical treatment permitted mitochondrial and other proteostatic adaptations to exercise, VitC treatment did not. During an in vitro oxidative challenge, phytochemical treatment helped maintain proteostasis, including the mitochondrial fraction, while VitC did not. Our findings support the conclusion that VitC can blunt some of the beneficial adaptations to exercise. We propose that regulation of endogenous antioxidants represents a novel approach to maintain redox balance while still permitting redox-sensitive proteostatic adaptations.

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Mar 29, 2018

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