A novel triple-tracer approach to assess postprandial protein turnover

A novel triple-tracer approach to assess postprandial protein turnover Insulin and nutrients have profound effects on proteome homeostasis. Currently no reliable methods are available to measure postprandial protein turnover. A triple-tracer method was developed using phenylalanine stable isotope tracers to estimate appearance rates of ingested (Ra meal) and endogenous phenylalanine and the rate of phenylalanine disposal (Rd). This was compared with the “traditional” dual-tracer method, using one (1-CM)- and two (2-CM)-compartment models. For both methods, [13C6]phenylalanine was given orally, and [15N]phenylalanine was constantly infused; the triple-tracer method added [2H5]phenylalanine, infused at rates to mimic meal [13C6]phenylalanine appearance. Additionally, incorporation of meal-derived phenylalanine into specific proteins was measured after purification by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The triple-tracer approach reduced modeling errors, allowing improved reconstruction of Ra meal with a tracer-to-tracee ratio that was more constant and better estimated Rd. The 2-CM better described phenylalanine kinetics and Rd than 1-CM. Thus, the triple-tracer approach using 2-CM is superior for measuring non-steady-state postprandial protein turnover. This novel approach also allows measurement of postprandial synthesis rates of specific plasma proteins. We offer a valid non-steady-state model to measure postprandial protein turnover and synthesis of plasma proteins that can safely be applied in adults, children, and pregnant women. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Endocrinology and Metabolism The American Physiological Society

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/lp/aps/a-novel-triple-tracer-approach-to-assess-postprandial-protein-turnover-2LJTOvyl76
ISSN
0193-1849
eISSN
1522-1555
D.O.I.
10.1152/ajpendo.00012.2018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Insulin and nutrients have profound effects on proteome homeostasis. Currently no reliable methods are available to measure postprandial protein turnover. A triple-tracer method was developed using phenylalanine stable isotope tracers to estimate appearance rates of ingested (Ra meal) and endogenous phenylalanine and the rate of phenylalanine disposal (Rd). This was compared with the “traditional” dual-tracer method, using one (1-CM)- and two (2-CM)-compartment models. For both methods, [13C6]phenylalanine was given orally, and [15N]phenylalanine was constantly infused; the triple-tracer method added [2H5]phenylalanine, infused at rates to mimic meal [13C6]phenylalanine appearance. Additionally, incorporation of meal-derived phenylalanine into specific proteins was measured after purification by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The triple-tracer approach reduced modeling errors, allowing improved reconstruction of Ra meal with a tracer-to-tracee ratio that was more constant and better estimated Rd. The 2-CM better described phenylalanine kinetics and Rd than 1-CM. Thus, the triple-tracer approach using 2-CM is superior for measuring non-steady-state postprandial protein turnover. This novel approach also allows measurement of postprandial synthesis rates of specific plasma proteins. We offer a valid non-steady-state model to measure postprandial protein turnover and synthesis of plasma proteins that can safely be applied in adults, children, and pregnant women.

Journal

AJP - Endocrinology and MetabolismThe American Physiological Society

Published: Oct 1, 2018

References

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