Silicate Deposit Degradation of Engineered Coatings in Gas Turbines: Progress Toward Models and Materials Solutions

Silicate Deposit Degradation of Engineered Coatings in Gas Turbines: Progress Toward Models and... Modern gas turbines rely on ceramic coatings to protect structural components along the hot gas path. These coatings are susceptible to accelerated degradation caused by silicate deposits formed when ingested environmental debris (dust, sand, ash) adheres to the coatings. This article reviews the current understanding of the deposit-induced failure mechanisms for zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings and silicate environmental barrier coatings. Details of the debris melting and crystallization behavior, the nature of the chemical reactions occurring between the deposits and coatings, and the implications for the thermocyclic durability of the coatings are described. Given the challenges posed in understanding how prospective coating materials and architectures will respond to a broad range of deposit compositions, it is proposed to develop an integrated framework linking thermochemical and thermomechanical models to predict coating durability. Initial progress toward developing this framework, and the requisite research needs, are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Materials Research Annual Reviews

Silicate Deposit Degradation of Engineered Coatings in Gas Turbines: Progress Toward Models and Materials Solutions

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
1531-7331
eISSN
1545-4118
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev-matsci-010917-105000
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Modern gas turbines rely on ceramic coatings to protect structural components along the hot gas path. These coatings are susceptible to accelerated degradation caused by silicate deposits formed when ingested environmental debris (dust, sand, ash) adheres to the coatings. This article reviews the current understanding of the deposit-induced failure mechanisms for zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings and silicate environmental barrier coatings. Details of the debris melting and crystallization behavior, the nature of the chemical reactions occurring between the deposits and coatings, and the implications for the thermocyclic durability of the coatings are described. Given the challenges posed in understanding how prospective coating materials and architectures will respond to a broad range of deposit compositions, it is proposed to develop an integrated framework linking thermochemical and thermomechanical models to predict coating durability. Initial progress toward developing this framework, and the requisite research needs, are discussed.

Journal

Annual Review of Materials ResearchAnnual Reviews

Published: Jul 3, 2017

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