Regulation of Cell Polarity in Motility and Cell Division in Myxococcus xanthus

Regulation of Cell Polarity in Motility and Cell Division in Myxococcus xanthus Rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells are polarized with proteins asymmetrically localizing to specific positions. This spatial organization is important for regulation of motility and cell division and changes over time. Dedicated protein modules regulate motility independent of the cell cycle, and cell division dependent on the cell cycle. For motility, a leading-lagging cell polarity is established that is inverted during cellular reversals. Establishment and inversion of this polarity are regulated hierarchically by interfacing protein modules that sort polarized motility proteins to the correct cell poles or cause their relocation between cell poles during reversals akin to a spatial toggle switch. For division, a novel self-organizing protein module that incorporates a ParA ATPase positions the FtsZ-ring at midcell. This review covers recent findings concerning the spatiotemporal regulation of motility and cell division in M. xanthus and illustrates how the study of diverse bacteria may uncover novel mechanisms involved in regulating bacterial cell polarity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Microbiology Annual Reviews

Regulation of Cell Polarity in Motility and Cell Division in Myxococcus xanthus

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
0066-4227
eISSN
1545-3251
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev-micro-102215-095415
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells are polarized with proteins asymmetrically localizing to specific positions. This spatial organization is important for regulation of motility and cell division and changes over time. Dedicated protein modules regulate motility independent of the cell cycle, and cell division dependent on the cell cycle. For motility, a leading-lagging cell polarity is established that is inverted during cellular reversals. Establishment and inversion of this polarity are regulated hierarchically by interfacing protein modules that sort polarized motility proteins to the correct cell poles or cause their relocation between cell poles during reversals akin to a spatial toggle switch. For division, a novel self-organizing protein module that incorporates a ParA ATPase positions the FtsZ-ring at midcell. This review covers recent findings concerning the spatiotemporal regulation of motility and cell division in M. xanthus and illustrates how the study of diverse bacteria may uncover novel mechanisms involved in regulating bacterial cell polarity.

Journal

Annual Review of MicrobiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Sep 8, 2017

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