Neural Circuitry of Reward Prediction Error

Neural Circuitry of Reward Prediction Error Dopamine neurons facilitate learning by calculating reward prediction error, or the difference between expected and actual reward. Despite two decades of research, it remains unclear how dopamine neurons make this calculation. Here we review studies that tackle this problem from a diverse set of approaches, from anatomy to electrophysiology to computational modeling and behavior. Several patterns emerge from this synthesis: that dopamine neurons themselves calculate reward prediction error, rather than inherit it passively from upstream regions; that they combine multiple separate and redundant inputs, which are themselves interconnected in a dense recurrent network; and that despite the complexity of inputs, the output from dopamine neurons is remarkably homogeneous and robust. The more we study this simple arithmetic computation, the knottier it appears to be, suggesting a daunting (but stimulating) path ahead for neuroscience more generally. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Neuroscience Annual Reviews

Neural Circuitry of Reward Prediction Error

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
0147-006X
eISSN
1545-4126
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev-neuro-072116-031109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dopamine neurons facilitate learning by calculating reward prediction error, or the difference between expected and actual reward. Despite two decades of research, it remains unclear how dopamine neurons make this calculation. Here we review studies that tackle this problem from a diverse set of approaches, from anatomy to electrophysiology to computational modeling and behavior. Several patterns emerge from this synthesis: that dopamine neurons themselves calculate reward prediction error, rather than inherit it passively from upstream regions; that they combine multiple separate and redundant inputs, which are themselves interconnected in a dense recurrent network; and that despite the complexity of inputs, the output from dopamine neurons is remarkably homogeneous and robust. The more we study this simple arithmetic computation, the knottier it appears to be, suggesting a daunting (but stimulating) path ahead for neuroscience more generally.

Journal

Annual Review of NeuroscienceAnnual Reviews

Published: Jul 25, 2017

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