Microbiota-Based Therapies for Clostridium difficile and Antibiotic-Resistant Enteric Infections

Microbiota-Based Therapies for Clostridium difficile and Antibiotic-Resistant Enteric Infections Bacterial pathogens are increasingly antibiotic resistant, and development of clinically effective antibiotics is lagging. Curing infections increasingly requires antimicrobials that are broader spectrum, more toxic, and more expensive, and mortality attributable to antibiotic-resistant pathogens is rising. The commensal microbiota, comprising microbes that colonize the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, can provide high levels of resistance to infection, and the contributions of specific bacterial species to resistance are being discovered and characterized. Microbiota-mediated mechanisms of colonization resistance and pathogen clearance include bactericidal activity, nutrient depletion, immune activation, and manipulation of the gut's chemical environment. Current research is focusing on development of microbiota-based therapies to reduce intestinal colonization with antibiotic-resistant pathogens, with the goal of reducing pathogen transmission and systemic dissemination. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Microbiology Annual Reviews

Microbiota-Based Therapies for Clostridium difficile and Antibiotic-Resistant Enteric Infections

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 2017 by Annual Reviews.All rights reserved
ISSN
0066-4227
eISSN
1545-3251
D.O.I.
10.1146/annurev-micro-090816-093549
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bacterial pathogens are increasingly antibiotic resistant, and development of clinically effective antibiotics is lagging. Curing infections increasingly requires antimicrobials that are broader spectrum, more toxic, and more expensive, and mortality attributable to antibiotic-resistant pathogens is rising. The commensal microbiota, comprising microbes that colonize the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, can provide high levels of resistance to infection, and the contributions of specific bacterial species to resistance are being discovered and characterized. Microbiota-mediated mechanisms of colonization resistance and pathogen clearance include bactericidal activity, nutrient depletion, immune activation, and manipulation of the gut's chemical environment. Current research is focusing on development of microbiota-based therapies to reduce intestinal colonization with antibiotic-resistant pathogens, with the goal of reducing pathogen transmission and systemic dissemination.

Journal

Annual Review of MicrobiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Sep 8, 2017

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